Networking Terms Glossary

2.4GHz
3G
4G
5GHz
Access Point
Ad-Hoc
AES Encryption
Antenna
Bandwidth
Bit
Byte
Boot File
Bridge Mode
Broadband
Buffer
Client
Coaxial Cable
Command Prompt
DDoS
Decible (Db)
Default Gateway
DHCP
DMZ
DNS
DOCSIS
Double NAT
Download
DSL
DSL Filter
Dual-Band
Encryption Technique
Ethernet Cable
Ethernet Over Power
Ethernet Port
Fiber Optics
Firewall
Firmware
Fragmentation
Gateway
Gigahertz
Guest Network
Host
Hotspot
Hub
ICMP
ICS
Infrastructure
IP Address
IP Configuration
IPv4
IPv6
ISP
ISP Headend
Jitter
Lag
LAN
Latency
MAC Address
MAC Filtering
Modem
MTU
NAT
Network Bridge
Network Congestion
Node
Octet
Optical Network Terminal
QOS
Packet
Packet Loss
Passphrase
Peer to Peer (p2p)
Ping
Port Address Translation
Port Forwarding
Port
Port Triggering
PPPoE
Preamble
Protocol (TCP/UDP)
Provision
Server
SSID
Switch
System Cache
Teredo Tunneling
Throughput
Terminal
TKIP
Trace Route
Upload
UPnP (Universal Plug N Play)
Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
VoIP (Voice Over IP) Modem
Walled Garden
WAN
WEP
WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup)
Wireless Adapter
Wireless Channel
Wireless Frequency
Wireless Interference
Wireless Mode
Wireless Network
Wireless Range Extender
Wireless Repeater
Wireless Security
WPA
WPA2
2.4GHz
A radio frequency band used in wireless networking that is allocated for the 802.11 b/g/n wireless communication standard compliant devices (i.e. cordless phones, gaming headsets, baby monitors, Internet routers, ect.)
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3G
3G is a radio signal based Internet service that uses cell towers. This is most commonly seen in cell phones as well as standalone devices called "Hotspots". The theoretical peak speed for this service is 14.7 Mbps download, although this is very rarely seen. *3G connections are not recommended for Xbox Live due to the inconsistent nature of the connection*.
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4G
4G is the fourth generation of cell tower based Internet service. Like 3G this service is primarily offered through cell phones and hotspot devices. The theoretical maximum speed for this service varies based on the service provider, but can range anywhere from 21 Mbps to 1 Gbps although these speeds are extremely rare. *4G connections are not recommended for Xbox Live due to the inconsistent nature of the connection*.
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5GHz
A radio frequency band that is used by IEEE standard 802.11 a/n type devices. The use of this frequency band is becoming more prevalent.
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Access Point
Access Points provide a wireless extension to an otherwise non-wireless network. They do not provide any kind of router functionality.
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Ad-Hoc
Ad-Hoc is a method of wireless networking. Rather than having a device such as a router or access point, ad-hoc wireless networking is between two or more client devices. One device creates the wireless network and one or more other devices connect to that network.
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AES Encryption
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is an encryption type which is implemented in WPA and WPA2 wireless security. It is newer and more secure than TKIP and is the preferred encryption type for wireless security.
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Antenna
An antenna is an electronic device that converts electrical signals into radio waves. The reverse is also true. It absorbs radio signals and produces an electrical signal.
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Bandwidth
A measurement of bit-rate transfer available or otherwise consumed by data communication resources. It is expressed in bits per second or multiples of it (i.e. bits per second, kilobits per second, Megabits per second, Gigabits per second, etc.) This is most commonly referred to when calculating throughput.
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Bit
The smallest unit of measure in computing or networking, typically represented by a 1 or 0.
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Byte
Unit of measurement in computing or networking consisting of 8 bits.
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Boot File
The Boot File is the file that determines what Internet speed tier you receive from your Internet Provider or if the modem is allowed to provide Internet access at all. This file is pushed to the modem by the ISP when the modem is provisioned for service activation.
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Bridge Mode
This is a configuration that disables the NAT feature on a gateway and allows a router to function as a DHCP server without an IP Address conflict. By placing a gateway into bridge mode you are removing its routing functionality and allowing it to pass the external IP address along directly to the attached device.
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Broadband
A high-speed Internet service, such as DSL or Cable Internet. Broadband is actually a marketing term that has no official classification however, it is often used to refer to Internet services with bandwidth transfer rates greater than that of Dial-up or even 3G connection. This is not only referring to the speed of the service provided but also the quality & stability of that service.
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Buffer
A term used to refer to the space between the loading point of data and the point at which it is processed. Issues occur when the transfer rate of the data on any given network is transmitted slower than the data is actually played, this causes the input data to wait until it can load behind the output data.
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Client
A client is a device that relies on a host device to connect.
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Coaxial Cable
A cable used to carry radio frequencies for Cable TV provided services such as Internet, Phone(VoIP), and Television channels.
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Command Prompt
A user interface used within Windows computers to view many functions and settings, in the case of troubleshooting , you may use this program to test the network connection as well as measuring some key network factors. (i.e. Ping times, Packet delivery, Server Route and IP configuration)
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DDoS
Distributed Denial of Service or DDoS is an attack to disable someone's network by sending massive amounts of data from one or more sources to a target IP Address. This can overwhelm the targeted network to the point where it may become disconnected and shut down. This will prevent network access for any legitimate users. This is also known as IP Flooding.
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Decibel (Db)
A unit of measurement used to express the gain, attenuation and power used in RF signal. It is a way of quantifying the reduction in signals by definitive factors.
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Default Gateway
The Gateway is the point at which network traffic passes from the internal network to the external internet. The Default is the IP address of the device routing that network traffic. This is often the role of the Modem/Gateway/Router.
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DHCP
An acronym, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol is an Internet Protocol that allows most host networking devices to delegate unique IP addresses within a certain range to other client devices on the LAN network. It is dynamic because the IP addresses may change at any time after the IP lease has expired or the connected devices are disconnected.
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DMZ
DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) is a function within most network routing devices that allows the forwarding of all network traffic & all internet ports unsolicited or otherwise to a designated device. This process sets the designated device outside the network firewall. This can solve most NAT issues for gaming systems but is not recommended for your personal computer without advanced networking knowledge.
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DNS
DNS or otherwise known as Domain Name System is a series of servers that store registered domain names for ease of access from host/client networks. The DNS server acts as a phone book for internet domain quarries where hostnames are entered such as xbox.com and then the DNS server converts that into the designated IP destination of 65.55.42.140. Web sites are reached by IP address, but the DNS server makes it easier for us to remember and enter these web addresses.
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DOCSIS
Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification is the standard by which Internet service is delivered over coaxial cable by way of channel bonding allowing for more frequencies to be utilized and more bandwidth made available. This standard has evolved over time and is now in it's 3.0 version.
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Double NAT
This is in reference to a Local Area Network that has two routing points, like a router and gateway, each actively using Network Address Translation. The resulting issue can be that the data stacks are dropped when categorized as unsolicited or non-fragmented.
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Download
The process in which information/data is sent to your online device. Whether receiving data from a website attempting to load on screen or getting the latest firmware updates, the stream of data is flowing to you. Downloading of music and marketplace games requires a different amount of data than streaming a video or movie however, all are downloads.
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DSL
Digital Subscriber Line is a high speed Internet service type that brings the Internet signal into the home/business via the Telephone line. It is categorized as broadband service similar to cable and fiber optics meaning it has high amounts of bandwidth. DSL is thought to be able to support speeds up to 8.5Mbps however, most subscribers receive between 1.5Mbps-5Mbps.
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DSL Filter
A device that is implemented to filter the data traffic that is on the dedicated DSL. Filters are typically set to trap any frequencies above 4KHz. These filters can be present on any wall jacks that are not designated to carry the Internet Data to the Transcriber/DSL Modem. Filters allow the phone calls to be heard clearly without the noise of the data interfering with the voice data.
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Dual-Band
This is the capability to broadcast both 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequencies bands. This can also be done simultaneously. Most devices that posses this capability support 802.11a/b/g/n wireless types. Dual-Band transmission can benefit a wireless user by providing a different wireless frequency band to choose form if there happens to be some interference with the other frequency.
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Encryption Technique
There are various encryption techniques, some that work only in collusion with certain encryption methods, such as WPA2 with AES. This is necessary when sending sensitive data over a wireless network or communicating with a secure server. The most common encryption techniques are 64bit & 128bit for use with WEP as well as TKIP and AES which are used with WPA/WPA2.
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Ethernet Cable
Ethernet cables are types of cables used in networking. They allow data to be sent between devices.
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Ethernet Over Power
A technology that allows a user to utilize the power outlets in the home to transmit and receive data along the power grid. This allows the user to connect a modem at one end and receive the Internet signal at the other end. Designated devices are required to achieve this however, these are known as Power-line adapters or Home Plugs.
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Ethernet Port
An Ethernet port is an opening on computer network equipment that Ethernet cables plug into. These ports are alternatively called jacks or sockets. Ethernet ports accept cables with RJ-45 connectors.
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Fiber Optics
This is in reference to an Internet service that uses flexible glass fiber to transmit frequency signals with pulses of light. This can be used to cover great distances at a very high speeds. Light frequency is translated back into data at the end point.
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Firewall
Used to block unwanted data or unwanted users from accessing a network.
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Firmware
Firmware is the program running within a piece of hardware that defines what its capabilities and behaviours are.
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Fragmentation
This is when packets of information must be broken into smaller pieces before being transmit.
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Gateway
A Gateway is a device that serves the function of both a modem and a router.
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Gigahertz
This is a unit of measurement used to describe the frequency of a given signal.
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Guest Network
A guest network is a secondary network that some routers can produce. Its purpose is as its name implies for temporary connections with devices that are generally not a part of the network.
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Host
Host is the term that describes a device that manages all network communication between clients.
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Hotspot
A hotspot is generally a 3G/4G device that broadcasts a wireless network.
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Hub
A hub is networking device with multiple Ethernet ports that sends data to every connected device at once, unlike a switch which sends data to specific devices. Like a switch this device alone cannot provide internet to multiple devices in the way that a router can.
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ICMP
Internet Control Message Protocol is the language that routers and computers use to control the flow of information between them.
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ICS
Internet Connection Sharing a method of taking a connection from one network interface and share it with another interface. In most cases taking the wireless network that a laptop is connected to and sharing that access with its Ethernet port.
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Infrastructure
Infrastructure defines a mode of operation within a router. Meaning it is a supporting piece of the network.
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IP Address
An IP Address is a devices network address. Very much like a street address in the virtual network space.
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IP Configuration
Also known as IPConfig, is a command used in the DOS prompt to find specific information about the network your computer or device is connected to.
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IPv4
Also known as Internet Protocol Version 4, is a standard by which the internet is based and which routes most traffic on the internet. IPV4 uses 32 bit addresses (4 groups of 8 bytes, ex 192.168.1.1).
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IPv6
Also known as Internet Protocol Version 6, designed to take the place of IPv4 as those addresses run out. IPV6 uses 128 bit addresses ( 8 groups of 4 hexadecimal digits, ex 3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf).
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ISP
Internet Service Provider. This is the company that provides internet service to a home, business or school network.
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ISP Headend
A facility where internet originates from its provider and it is processed and distributed.
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Jitter
Describes the variation within a ping test. It is the largest variation of a single ping from the average.
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Lag
Is a term used to describe poor network performance. It means a delay or slow performance.
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LAN
Local Area Network. A local area network is a network limited to one geographical region. Examples include a home, school or small office.
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Latency
Describes the amount of time is takes for information to move from one location on a network to another. High Latency results in Lag. It is often measured in (ms).
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MAC Address
Also known as the Media Access Control Address, an unique address assigned to devices by their physical network, i.e. Ethernet adapter or wireless adapter.
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MAC Filtering
A method of security where a network filters devices and allows access determined by the 48-bit address assigned by the network card inside the device.
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Modem
A modem (Modulator-Demodulator) is a device that brings internet into the home.
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MTU
MTU or Maximum Transmission Unit is the measurement (in bytes) of the largest physical piece of information that can be sent on a network.
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NAT
NAT or Network Address Translation is the process by which a router translates between Private IP address provided by the it and the public IP address provided by the Internet Service Provider. This is what allows devices on your home network to communicate with other devices on the internet.
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Network Bridge
A Network Bridge is a virtual connection between two network interfaces on a computer. It allows for two way communication over the computer as if it were not there.
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Network Congestion
This happens when a node or network is carrying so much data that the Quality of Service of the network diminishes in ability, causing the network packet loss, data to queue up or to block new connections.
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Node
A node is a connection point between a client and a host.
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Octet
IPv4 addresses are broken up into four sections called octets, e.g. 192.168.1.1. Each of these sections is a byte consisting of 8 bits and where it gets its name.
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Optical Network Terminal
An Optical Network Terminal (ONT) is the point at which a fibre optic connection enters the home and is converted into either Ethernet or coaxial, so that it may be connected to a modem or gateway.
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QOS
A setting on a router or network that allows for there to be a distinction in importance between different types of data, applications etc. QOS will help manage network resources and delegate bandwidth or data to certain applications.
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Packet
A unit of data that is passed through a network.
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Packet Loss
When packets of data are passed through a network but fail to reach their destination.
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Passphrase
It is a method by which wireless networks are protected. A passphrase is similar to a password but often a lot longer and more complex (20-30 characters).
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Peer to Peer (p2p)
A type of network where tasks are shared across a community of users, for example network bandwidth or disk storage. There is no centralized server where information is stored.
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Ping
Utility used on the computer to measure the ability of a host or network to be reached and the time it takes to send a message from host to destination.
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Port Address Translation
Port Address Translation or PAT, is an extension to the network address translation or NAT. This function allows multiple devices on a network (LAN) to be attached to a single public IP address. Most routers use PAT, albeit some improperly. In such a scenario, the Internet Service Provider may assigns a single external IP address to the home network's router. When Xbox1 logs on the Internet, the router will assign it a port number, which is appended to the internal IP address. This, in effect, gives Xbox1 a unique address. If Xbox2 logs on the Internet at the same time, the router will assign it the same local IP address with a different port number. For example, (Xbox1-192.168.0.12:5689 and Xbox2-192.168.0.12:64210) Although both Xbox's are sharing the same public IP address and accessing the Internet at the same time, the router can distinguish which Xbox to send specific packets of data to because each Xbox has a unique internal address.
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Port Forwarding
Is a method by which certain ports can be manually set to be sent to certain devices on a network. These openings are persistent and in most cases bi-directional.
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Port
A port is a "hole" in a firewall. Port numbers are assigned to certain types of internet traffic so they can be classified and properly handled by the firewall.
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Port Triggering
Like port forwarding it allows you to manually set the firewalls behaviour by port number. In triggering the port is only opened when a device within your network has sent outbound traffic on that same port.
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PPPoE
Point to Point Protocol Over Ethernet, is a method of sending and receiving packets of information between a DSL provider and a PPPoE Modem/Gateway.
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Preamble
Also known as Radio Preamble, it is the header on the beginning of a packet of data. The length of the preamble can affect how much time it takes to send and receive information on a network.
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Protocol (TCP/UDP)
A set of rules that determines which devices can communicate with each other through a network.
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Provision
The process of preparing a modem or piece of equipment to receive internet service from a specific provider.
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Server
A server is a hardware device that hosts applications such as games.
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SSID
Also known as Service Set Identifier or network name. it is used to differentiate between different WLAN(Wireless Local Area Networks).
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Switch
A switch is a device used to increase the number of wired connections a router can support. A switch sends data to specific devices, unlike a hub which sends data to every connected device at once. Like a hub, this device alone cannot provide internet to multiple devices in the way that a router can.
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System Cache
In the Xbox 360, the system cache is an area within Storage that stores information so that it is readily accessible and makes it faster for the system to access that information temporarily.
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Teredo Tunneling
Is a method of NAT transversal. It allows two devices that would typically not be able to contact each other directly a means of establishing a connection via a 3rd party server.
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Throughput
A measure of the amount of successful messages sent across a communication channel such as an ethernet cable.
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Terminal
Terminal is a command line interface designed for Apple operating systems that allows users to interaction with the OS through text based commands.
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TKIP
Also known as Temporal Key Integrity Protocol, is an additional security measure that is used in conjunction with WPA.
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Trace Route
A utility that is executed with a computer that traces the path and the amount of delay between when a piece of information is sent out and then ends up at its intended destination.
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Upload
Upload is the act of sending packets from your local network to the Internet.
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UPnP (Universal Plug N Play)
UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) is a service in the router that allows for automatic detection and configuration of ports based on connected devices. This feature is required for the XBox to connect without receiving a NAT Warning.
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Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
VOIP (Voice Over IP) is phone service that operates over the Internet rather than phone lines.
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VoIP (Voice Over IP) Modem
A modem that is used to bring both internet and telephone into the home.
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Walled Garden
The walled garden is a state that an Internet connection can be placed in by the Internet Service Provider. It is the state that most new Internet installations are in until they have been activated via an Internet browser. A user may also find themselves in this state if they fail to pay their bill.
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WAN
WAN (Wide Area Network) is a network that covers a large geographical area. The Internet is an example of this.
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WEP
WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) is an older form of wireless security.
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WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup)
WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup) is a function that allows easy establishment of a secure wireless network by using a short term sync mode and a much shorter pre-determined passphrase or key. The Xbox 360 will not connect through a Wireless Protected Setup.
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Wireless Adapter
A wireless adapter is an accessory that can be used to give a non-wireless device the ability to connect to a wireless network.
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Wireless Channel
Wireless channel describes the designated band of the 2.4Ghz/5Ghz frequency. 2.4Ghz networks in the U.S. use channels 1-11. 5Ghz networks in the U.S. broadcast on channels 36,40,44 & 48-140. Each channel is 5Mhz apart from one another, however any channel within 25Mhz of each other have some overlay which can cause interference. For this reason channels 1, 6, & 11 are most widely used as they do not overlap with each other and give the best chance for a signal with little interference.
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Wireless Frequency
Wireless frequency also known as band is the signal's allocation on the wireless spectrum. These wireless modes A/B/G/N utilize wireless frequencies in the range of 2.412GHz-2.462GHz and 5.250GHz-5.725GHz of the RF spectrum. The standards that employ the use of these frequencies are as follows, IEEE standards 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11n.
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Wireless Interference
Wireless interference is caused when the wireless signal is being effected by other wireless devices or blocked by objects. Other wireless networks in your area may also be on the same wireless channel.
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Wireless Mode
Wireless Mode (802.11x) is the transfer rate at which a wireless network operates.
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Wireless Network
A Wireless Network is a network that allows devices to connect without the use of physical connections (such as Ethernet cables).
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Wireless Range Extender
A Wireless Range Extender is a device used to extend the range of a wireless network.
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Wireless Repeater
A Wireless Repeater is a device used to extend the range of a wireless network by repeating the network it is set to receive. It is a type of wireless range extender.
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Wireless Security
Wireless Security refers to a password encrypted wireless network. See also WEP, WPA, and WPA2.
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WPA
WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) is a type of wireless security. It is more secure than WEP.
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WPA2
WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access II) is one of the newest and most secure protocols for protecting wireless networks. Usually uses AES encryption for its security standard.
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Could a MOD Pin this to the top and make it easy to find?   Super useful to help customers with.

 
 

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最近更新 2020/07/13 3,025 次浏览 适用于: