Mordin Decision (Spoiler)

I find it hard to believe that Shepard would resort to killing one of his own crew members (except for Wrex in ME1).  You would think he has enough swag with Paragon/Renegade to get the result he wants.  So when I found out that the only way to keep Mordin alive in ME3 was to have destroyed Maelon's data in ME2, I was caught aghast. 


 

 

Thus, no matter what decision I made, Mordin was either going to taste the end of my barrel or the explosion at the top of the lab.  Where is the Paragon choice if I'm to save the galaxy?  Sure, it would be harder to convince Mordin to fake the genophage if I destroyed the data, but if I have accumulated enough points to sway decisions, I should have had an option to convince Mordin otherwise (that would have been the paragon choice, not letting him cure the genophage anyway). It's almost as if Shepard took the sissy way out and just pulled the trigger.  I expect something like that from Zaeed, but not from the greatest commander in the universe.  Shame on you Bioware! 

 

Discussion Info


Last updated July 3, 2018 Views 10 Applies to:

You missed the pt. In ME 3 people die. You have to choose which ones.

Yes I was really pissed off when I was doing my ultimate paragon run-through and even after doing everything right he still has to die. He was one of the funniest and most interesting characters in the game, with enough depth to make him interesting and enough secrecy to make him look "real".

I thought that the Paragon Action Prompt just before he goes would do something but unlike Mass Efffect 2, they don't actually change much, sometimes they just make you look good/bad.

The ultimate paragon doesn't necessarily save the most people, as Thane, Mordin and Legion die anyway. I would have sacrificed Jack, Miranda and Grunt just to save him ...

[quote user="Jasperrdm"]

You missed the pt. In ME 3 people die. You have to choose which ones.

[/quote]

Of course people die, but it isn't Shepard killing them. At least, that's not the Shepard that was developed in ME1 and ME2.  If you destroyed Maelon's data in ME2, Shepard and Mordin have the exact same conversation regarding Sabotage in ME3.

 

The difference, you are given Paragon/Renegade choices that results in Shepard swaying Mordin's decision and he lives.  Why is the outcome any different if you saved the data? My point is, let Shepard pull the trigger if he does not have the points to persuade (this was portrayed in ME2 by the Paragon/Renegade choices not being highlighted), but give me an option if I do.  

I thought Mordin's deaths (both versions) were some of the best scenes in the game.

I thought the way it was handled, and the only way to convince Mordin made sense.   Eve has to die(not save the data in ME2) AND Wrev has to be in charge..   In that situation Mordin concludes that without Eve to keep Wrev in line he will lust for power and in the end rebel.  

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Even if Eve dies and Wrex is in charge you can't convince him because he knows Wrex will do the right thing and aims to build the Krogan up as a proud not aggressive race.

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To Mordin this was his atonement for working on the genophage in the first place.   It's become the most important thing in his life and his final goal before he dies.  Shepard would only have so much 'sway' in the matter.  He's not going to be able to convince Mordin not to do something he believes is right.

[quote user="Payton Jones"]

I thought the way it was handled, and the only way to convince Mordin made sense.   Eve has to die(not save the data in ME2) AND Wrev has to be in charge..   In that situation Mordin concludes that without Eve to keep Wrev in line he will lust for power and in the end rebel.  

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Even if Eve dies and Wrex is in charge you can't convince him because he knows Wrex will do the right thing and aims to build the Krogan up as a proud not aggressive race.

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To Mordin this was his atonement for working on the genophage in the first place.   It's become the most important thing in his life and his final goal before he dies.  Shepard would only have so much 'sway' in the matter.  He's not going to be able to convince Mordin not to do something he believes is right.

[/quote]

This is how I see it.  Watching the cutscene with Mordin riding the elevator up to the top of the tower... he does his usual breath-in - breath-out and actually looks quite content with his decision. Even as he's talking to himself about the 'standard encryption protocols' while working at the console, he sounds 'happy'.  If you talked to him extensively during his loyalty mission in ME 2, you know how creating the genophage weighed heavily on him. Mordin couldn't have lived with himself if he hadn't done this. Not only could no amount of paragon / renegade score change this... IMO, no amount should change it..  I think it would have actually cheapened the paragon / renegade aspect if Shepard could have had a high enough score to change Mordin's mind. His life's work plagues him with guilt and doubts, but all it takes is a few choice paragon words from Shepard to make him see it differently? That just wouldn't add up to me.

I also think that the writers were going for a "this is how life works sometimes" in a cold, hard facts kind of situation. Choosing to do what you feel is right (saving Maelon and the data) doesn't always mean the events that occur afterward will be favorable and work out how you want them to. Sometimes doing what's right means consequences later on.  How many times in life do we make a decision to do what we feel is right, but later we second guess ourselves because a consequence of that decision turns out bad?

TBH, I think they did a beautiful job of illustrating that "damned if you do - damned if you don't" cliche in this instance. I hated the fact that Mordin had to give his life to 'right his wrong' too and I agree that he was a great character, but honestly... I wouldn't change a thing about that part of the story. It's powerful and compelling. It makes you second guess or regret a previous decision... or it makes you hate that you didn't have enough influence to make things work out well for everyone. It angers you. That's good story writing.