Gaming Picture Quality

Ok, so I have a 32" LG Tv screen, which plays in 1366x768 resolution. The highest picture quality that it displays is 720p, and will convert down any higher quality pictures. But, to display at '720p', it still upscales the image slightly. So, would upscaling a 720p image give a better picture, or should I downscaling a 1080p image?

Also, would running my Xbox at 720p keep it running slightly cooler, as the GPU doesn't have to work as hard? Any help and ideas on this would be greatly appreciated :)

 

Discussion Info


Last updated July 4, 2018 Views 2 Applies to:

You can do two things. You can either choose to play it at 720p or you can choose "Optimum Resolution", this will play at 1366x768.

[quote user="axleifish"]

Also, would running my Xbox at 720p keep it running slightly cooler, as the GPU doesn't have to work as hard? Any help and ideas on this would be greatly appreciated :)

[/quote]

It won't really make that much difference.

 

Why? Because the Xbox 360 doesn't render the majority of games at 1080p natively. It upscales them. Alot of games are even upscaled to 720p.

 

The GPU doesn't even get that hot at 1080p. I find the CPU gets alot hotter than the GPU.

Firstly, thanks a lot for the fast replies :)  I had tried the opimum resolution setting before, however it chose 1080i, and although this was good on the whole, it occasionally gave extra motion blur while in fast paced games such as Forza 3, and also gave a slight blurring in games with a lot of detail and different textures, such as Fallout: New Vegas. Or is this just me being far too fussy about it?

With anything audio and visual, it's all about what's good for you. If you don't like it, and you have the option to not use it then don't use it.

Blurring is more the Xbox 360s way of hiding bad anti aliasing, or lack of it. Anti aliasing is very taxing on the ancient GPU hardware the Xbox 360 has so you'll find this is a common technique used on the system along with some other techniques such as MSAA and the new (for consoles anyway) MLAA. Some games may allow you to turn it off.

If it is really that much of an issue, run VGA. I run VGA in order to correct the image since my TV is 16:10 instead of 16:9. It claims to be 1280x720 but actually I run at 1440x900 to fix the issue. The Xbox 360 doesn't work like a PC game in the matter of resolution. If you change up the res in a PC game, your frames per second will decrease dramatically but image quality will go up. On an Xbox 360, image quality doesn't change, because all it is doing is upscaling or downscaling the image on the TV, the 360 isn't doing any extra or less work. It is designed to render in one mode, the only difference is what level of quality is transmitted. When you change the res, you don't change the quality. Now, I would say that there is no difference between 720p and 1080p because most games are natively designed to run at 720p (same goes for PS3). Only a few games natively run at 1080p and they are usually arcade games that aren't the best looking. Some games are even natively run 600p like some of the CODs and Halo. The only time you will really see any image quality difference is if you run interlaced vs progressive. So yes, at 1080i you will get an image that may not be up to snuff to 720p. And no, at your resolution you said, it is not upscaling to 720p, it is downscaling to 720p, which is fine, since for the majority of games it is the native resolution.

[quote user="Unreal Warfare"]

With anything audio and visual, it's all about what's good for you. If you don't like it, and you have the option to not use it then don't use it.

Blurring is more the Xbox 360s way of hiding bad anti aliasing, or lack of it. Anti aliasing is very taxing on the ancient GPU hardware the Xbox 360 has so you'll find this is a common technique used on the system along with some other techniques such as MSAA and the new (for consoles anyway) MLAA. Some games may allow you to turn it off.

[/quote]

Actually, the archictecture in the 360 GPU allows for some very low performance cost AA, however, because of the design, it isn't the greatest AA.

The below link is probably the best you can ever read on the subject of Xbox 360 games and their native resolutions (among other things).

 

Beyond3D

[quote user="Hellhog"]

[quote user="Unreal Warfare"]

With anything audio and visual, it's all about what's good for you. If you don't like it, and you have the option to not use it then don't use it.

Blurring is more the Xbox 360s way of hiding bad anti aliasing, or lack of it. Anti aliasing is very taxing on the ancient GPU hardware the Xbox 360 has so you'll find this is a common technique used on the system along with some other techniques such as MSAA and the new (for consoles anyway) MLAA. Some games may allow you to turn it off.

[/quote]

 

Actually, the archictecture in the 360 GPU allows for some very low performance cost AA, however, because of the design, it isn't the greatest AA.

[/quote]

 

Yes. MSAA (Multi Sampling Anti Aliasing) and MLAA (Morphological Filtering Anti Aliasing) as already stated, lol. 

 

 

 

Alright, thanks for the information everyone. I know that it probably seemed like quite a trivial thing to ask about, but I like knowing that I've got the best out of my computers, consoles, and just about anything else really :P

OP try all options on your tv. On my old plasma with a native 480p res I ran at 720p because it looked better. I have no idea how its technically possible. Even 1080p looked better but I chose 720p. None of this made sense to me as the tv could only natively pump out 480p. The tv was designed to handle the higher res somehow...how I don't know. so try your tv with the various options and just take what looks best.