A 10 for this game? really??

so i finally bought this game this past week to see what all the hype was about. Can someone please tell me it gets better?! i just got out of the vault and as dull as that was i find myself in the nearest town talking to everyone i see for minutes at a time. Why in the world do people like having to engage in menu after menu of text?? no wonder they say this game has about 100 hrs of play time. most of it is spent just talking to people...I bought it cause "they" said you don't HAVE to be a role playing fan to like this game but apparently you do...mind you i was bored with nights of the old republic for the same reason but i'm willing to hang in there and play through that one simply because of the star wars theme...so i guess what i'm asking is, does this Fallout get better? or will i encounter hours upon hours of text and dialogue just to advance somewhere? if that's the case than i will gladly return this thing...and to think i bought the 1st 2 expansion packs thinking i was getting a good deal but as of right now i'm feeling a little ripped off even if it cost me 22 bucks for both disks.  

 

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Last updated July 3, 2018 Views 6 Applies to:

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It takes getting use to,  it's quite slow to start.   Looking at your games you tend to be more an action-based person (although you technically do have at least 2 RPGs in your collection).  What kind of character are you gearing towards?  A straight up marksman, a CQC specialist, a Rogue type?   Remember as a Western RPG (Wrpg?) it's pretty free-roaming so it's pretty easy to get overwhelmed;  do you choose to find daddy or make your own way,  do you choose to be good, neutral or bad? 

 

I've a feeling that once you find your characters "niche" it'll be more enjoyable to you.  If it isn't then you can chalk it up to this not being your general type of genre (FPSs aren't mine).  

 

Phyrian, Maulyoda if either of you read this, more advice please.

Yes, it gets better.  The beginning is slow and, in places, tedious.  Somewhere between 5 and 15 hours in (depending on your play style/speed) things begin to pick up.  I kind of consider the game right up to the point where you leave Megaton to be the prologue.  Most of your time to this point is spent learning about the Fallout world and how the game works.  Think of it as the tutorial level many games include, where you spend a great deal of time learning and preparing, and not much time getting anything actually accomplished.  I'm not sure if I would include the survival handbook quests as part of this prologue or not, given that some of the bits can be completed without leaving town, while others require you to get out there and start exploring.  I guess it is sort of the gateway quest between the prologue and the meat of the game.

Note that as an RPG there will always be talking to be done.  Almost all of your quests are granted as a result of talking to NPCs, but the ratio of talking to action is pretty high in the beginning and diminishes as you move on.  If you really want to avoid the larger sections of dialogue, or at least space them out, then you should probably do some exploring and search for side quests between each of the main story line quests.  If I recall correctly each of these has a bit of talking that needs to be done in order to move on to the next section.

You can also run off and do Operation Anchorage and/or The Pitt at very low levels.  OA can be done right out of the vault if you have a reasonably decent build.  Both should be done while your level is low, or you'll breeze through them too easily.  I like to secure my megaton home, then run off to OA.  Once I've got all the loot from OA safely stored in my home, its off to The Pitt.  This has several advantages.  First, it gets you into some action pretty quickly, second both result in some very nice loot, and third neither one will deplete your own supplies (because you can't take anything with you in either one).  Both add-ons are geared towards low level characters, and completing both will give you a good head start on the rest of the wasteland in terms of gear, ammo, caps, and level.

[quote user="Randzz"]

It takes getting use to,  it's quite slow to start.   Looking at your games you tend to be more an action-based person (although you technically do have at least 2 RPGs in your collection).  What kind of character are you gearing towards?  A straight up marksman, a CQC specialist, a Rogue type?   Remember as a Western RPG (Wrpg?) it's pretty free-roaming so it's pretty easy to get overwhelmed;  do you choose to find daddy or make your own way,  do you choose to be good, neutral or bad? 

 

I've a feeling that once you find your characters "niche" it'll be more enjoyable to you.  If it isn't then you can chalk it up to this not being your general type of genre (FPSs aren't mine).  

 

Phyrian, Maulyoda if either of you read this, more advice please.

[/quote]

 

hmm; well i guess i tend to go with being good as I tend to think that will give me the "real" ending. (as i did with knights of the old republic). The only problem with that is that a game would have to be extremely good in order to get me to play it again the alternate way to see a different outcome. Bioshock comes to mind as everyone praised it but i grew very bored with it throughout that when i finished it I had no desire to play the evil side of it and consider it one of the most overrated games of all time. I held off on buying Fallout until now because the price was finally right for me since I was skeptical of it being a role playing game at heart. what convinced me were the high reviews and the fact that  "you don't have to be an rpg fan to enjoy". Mind you I don't really hate rpg's as I have enjoyed legend of zelda, mario rpg, and a few others from that era...i just feel that if i'm going to invest that much time in a game that i should enjoy every minute of it and the game should make me want to play more...so far this game is not... by the way what 2 rpg's are you referring to other than this one? I know knights of the old republic is one (yet to finish for the same reasons as this one) but what is the other?

transform

[quote user="phyrian"]

Yes, it gets better.  The beginning is slow and, in places, tedious.  Somewhere between 5 and 15 hours in (depending on your play style/speed) things begin to pick up.  I kind of consider the game right up to the point where you leave Megaton to be the prologue.  Most of your time to this point is spent learning about the Fallout world and how the game works.  Think of it as the tutorial level many games include, where you spend a great deal of time learning and preparing, and not much time getting anything actually accomplished.  I'm not sure if I would include the survival handbook quests as part of this prologue or not, given that some of the bits can be completed without leaving town, while others require you to get out there and start exploring.  I guess it is sort of the gateway quest between the prologue and the meat of the game.

Note that as an RPG there will always be talking to be done.  Almost all of your quests are granted as a result of talking to NPCs, but the ratio of talking to action is pretty high in the beginning and diminishes as you move on.  If you really want to avoid the larger sections of dialogue, or at least space them out, then you should probably do some exploring and search for side quests between each of the main story line quests.  If I recall correctly each of these has a bit of talking that needs to be done in order to move on to the next section.

You can also run off and do Operation Anchorage and/or The Pitt at very low levels.  OA can be done right out of the vault if you have a reasonably decent build.  Both should be done while your level is low, or you'll breeze through them too easily.  I like to secure my megaton home, then run off to OA.  Once I've got all the loot from OA safely stored in my home, its off to The Pitt.  This has several advantages.  First, it gets you into some action pretty quickly, second both result in some very nice loot, and third neither one will deplete your own supplies (because you can't take anything with you in either one).  Both add-ons are geared towards low level characters, and completing both will give you a good head start on the rest of the wasteland in terms of gear, ammo, caps, and level.

[/quote]

 

well thanks for the time estimate as it gives me a better idea of what to expect or not to expect. right now i'm sitting at about an 1 and 20 min at level 3. just came back from getting some food for the lady that runs the supply store but just my luck the place is closed so i have to roam the town and wait for her to return ( not my idea of fun), i figured i'd spend some money on the hooker lady while i wait, and see how that plays out but apparently i only have 6 credits even though i haven't bought anything and i could have sworn i had over 200 before i encountered the raiders, it's not like they stole money from me being that i killed them all, anyhow,...

can't even disarm the bomb as i am not qualified yet. as for the expansion packs, i thought they were for when you finish the game... i don't know, i guess because i am now an older gamer (30's) i like my games to be a little more fast paced, but i also like to be challenged and entertained at the same time (i.e. Portal). I guess i was thinking this game would be more like grand theft auto in that you do have to talk to people and do side quests and such but that game is more fast paced and you're choices for conversation rarely extend from one answer to another set of multiple answers. granted i only played through that (or those) games once but it kept me coming back for more the entire time until i finished it...unfortunately I don't think i have the patience to play through nearly 15 hrs of fallout to get the game moving at a decent pace. I'll give it another 2 days before i can return it for my money back...too bad as i really wanted to like this game; this game received 9's and 10's across the board from critics and users but a game that starts this slow should not rate so highly; maybe it's just me then.

transform

sorry for the large paragraphs as i don't know how to break up text in these forums; apparently microsoft wants to be the odd man out by not making it as simple as hitting enter.

transform

 

You have to use the rich formatting option to break things out into proper paragraphs in the new forums.  As you can see from my previous post I occasionally forget that.

 

With where you are now it won't be 15 hours before it picks up, you should be closer to the 5 hour end of the scale.  Note that when a shop is closed you have a couple of options to more quickly pass the time.  When you sleep in a bed you can choose how long to sleep for, so just sleep until the shop will be open again.  If you don't want to wander off to find a bed you can also wait by hitting the back button, which likewise allows you to choose an amount of time to let pass.  

 

Sounds like you're on the verge of entering the game proper, and at this point would probably benefit from finding Bethesda Ruins, my favorite spot for gathering up gear and making some caps in the early part of the game.  The place is populated with Raiders, enough of them that it can get a bit tough at low levels, but the rewards are pretty good.  Lots of weapons and armor that you can repair for use or selling, which should allow you to get your hands on some decent low level gear and a good stockpile of ammo.  To find it, head north from Megaton until you find a river crossing, then follow the road on the other side.  It is almost due north of the Super Duper mart on the other side of the river.

 

Not that it really matters, but I am also a 30-something gamer and remember playing the Legend of Zelda on the old NES.  I'm afraid that much like the TV shows we watched in those days, our memories of those games are probably better than the games actually are.  Over time our expectations have risen significantly, but all we really remember is how much fun we had back then.

 

@OP:  The other "RPG" I was referring to your Castlevania SoTN;  you gain levels & there's dialogue & sidequests in the form of you not being able to access certain areas until you complete certain other things,  & of course accessories in the forms of weapons, armor & the like.   It's probably the closest Castlevania will get to making a real RPG.  I consider it to be an action~RPG. 

 

To add to what phyrian wrote. 

 

  • Find your "niche".  My thing is exploring, so I geared my character toward that end  with her skills, perks, & so forth. What type of character interests you?  A Gunslinger, a tank/defensive type, a brawler, a "techie"? As I stated before,  once you find the kind of character that interests you it'll be more enjoyable, at least that's my take. 

 

As for some other stuff when starting off. 

 

  • Look for the Bobbleheads.  They're worth finding as they give you things, either permanent STATS boosts or skills boosts.  There's 20 Bobbleheads in the game.  3 are in your general location when starting & you can & should get them ASAP.  The first is in vault 101, the second is in Megaton, & the Third is in the Bethesda ruins. 
  • The Bethesda ruins, the Super Duper mart, & the elementary school ruins are fair places to stock up your character, in 2 of thiose places the baddies tend to respawn every 72 hours or so, so you can stock up on their weapons, armor, ammo & sell any excess to build caps. 
  • Karma is pretty blanket, if that means anything to you.  So if you're good you'lll be known as good everywhere, even in places you've never been to before.  Same goes if you play a "bad guy" or a neutral character.  The hardest thing to be is a Neutral karma character, since that's a very hard scale to stay in between. 
  • You get a perk every level, so while you don't have to plan ahead for every little thing, it does help.  
  • If you get the apartment in Megaton, get that doctors area ASAP.  Just about everything edible is irradiated, & that doctors thing more then winds up paying for itself after awhile since it removes rads, heals limbs & restores health.  
  • Things tend to level with you, so level grinding (the Jrpg staple) doesn't really mean much.  
  • VATS;  learn it, love it, use it.   Hit locations are a beautiful thing.  Just be careful when using VATS in melee,as hit locations are only available in that mode with ranged weapons.  
  • Save often & have more then one save.  Fallout 3 is relatively stable, but I don't like leaving things to chance.   Also there's more then a few times that you wanna see what would happen if you made decision X instead of decision Y.  

[quote user="phyrian"]

 

You have to use the rich formatting option to break things out into proper paragraphs in the new forums.  As you can see from my previous post I occasionally forget that.

 

With where you are now it won't be 15 hours before it picks up, you should be closer to the 5 hour end of the scale.  Note that when a shop is closed you have a couple of options to more quickly pass the time.  When you sleep in a bed you can choose how long to sleep for, so just sleep until the shop will be open again.  If you don't want to wander off to find a bed you can also wait by hitting the back button, which likewise allows you to choose an amount of time to let pass.  

 

Sounds like you're on the verge of entering the game proper, and at this point would probably benefit from finding Bethesda Ruins, my favorite spot for gathering up gear and making some caps in the early part of the game.  The place is populated with Raiders, enough of them that it can get a bit tough at low levels, but the rewards are pretty good.  Lots of weapons and armor that you can repair for use or selling, which should allow you to get your hands on some decent low level gear and a good stockpile of ammo.  To find it, head north from Megaton until you find a river crossing, then follow the road on the other side.  It is almost due north of the Super Duper mart on the other side of the river.

 

Not that it really matters, but I am also a 30-something gamer and remember playing the Legend of Zelda on the old NES.  I'm afraid that much like the TV shows we watched in those days, our memories of those games are probably better than the games actually are.  Over time our expectations have risen significantly, but all we really remember is how much fun we had back then.

 

[/quote]

 

I see, well in another thread someone mentioned a way of breaking up paragraphs without entering the rich text format which consisted of pressing several keys ( i forgot how)...anyhow, the more I hear about the steps to take just to advance a bit in the game the more i dread playing it. I just don't like the idea of spending an hour in a game to advance 2% within the game...just like an "action" movie i don't want to sit through an hour of a movie just to get into some action scenes. As for the older games of yesteryear, i partly agree with you but like a good song or movie that are considered "timeless classics" their are a select few games from that era that can hold their weight today in terms of sheer entertainment value. games like super metroid and mega man come to mind as i can play those over and over again...most of today's so called blockbusters i can only play through once and find no replay value. i include your current crop of grand theft autos, call of duty's and the like...to put it in perspective a game that i tend to play regularly with much delight has been pinball fx2, but i digress...

Yes it's true are expectations have risen and as such we should be getting much better games with the much bigger budgets of today.

 

transform

[quote user="Randzz"]

@OP:  The other "RPG" I was referring to your Castlevania SoTN;  you gain levels & there's dialogue & sidequests in the form of you not being able to access certain areas until you complete certain other things,  & of course accessories in the forms of weapons, armor & the like.   It's probably the closest Castlevania will get to making a real RPG.  I consider it to be an action~RPG. 

 

To add to what phyrian wrote. 

 

  • Find your "niche".  My thing is exploring, so I geared my character toward that end  with her skills, perks, & so forth. What type of character interests you?  A Gunslinger, a tank/defensive type, a brawler, a "techie"? As I stated before,  once you find the kind of character that interests you it'll be more enjoyable, at least that's my take. 

 

[/quote]

Hmm, I don't consider SoTN an action rpg more of an action platformer with rpg elements. Castlevania did try leaning more towards the rpg side with Castlevania 2's Belmont's Quest (if i remember correctly) on the nes and even though it wasn't as well received as the others that followed, i still find it more entertaining than this fallout... (right now)...in terms of my character in fallout i wasn't aware that i had so many options, i know i took a test in the vault but my dialog with the test giver led me to believe it didn't matter...by having different traits and interests i didn't want to diminish my attributes that would impede me from quickly advancing in the game (i.e. easily breaking into terminals, doors, etc.) i guess i'm trying to be a well rounded character that can do it all. whatever that may fall under...obviously getting into the bulk of the game will require me giving it more than a week to get into. maybe i'll return it and invest in portal 2 or that new chess game which is hard to find...i guess i'm not cut out for today's rpg's but my point about this game was that it wasn't billed as a full out solid rpg; or maybe it was and i overlooked it cause so many were praising the first person shooter element. 

transform

My first character ran close to 100 hours of game play without any add-ons and without planning my character out.  Most of that time was spent exploring and completing side quests, you can actually do the main story in probably 20 hours or so without too much difficulty.  He ended up being a pretty well rounded character, and once I started the next leg of the main quest (Galaxy News Radio) things picked up for him pretty quickly.

 

I really don't know why people like to call FO3 a FPS, it really isn't.  It has some of the most basic elements of a FPS (you shoot, and your perspective is 1st person), but most of the other elements of a FPS are missing.  You have to manage your inventory, monitor the condition of your weapons and armor, bullet paths are determined at least as much by your character's skill as by where you put the cross hairs, and the list can go on.  I've argued (old forums) with people trying to call it a FPS, because I really don't think it belongs in that category at all.

 

All that aside, try the GNR quest, and if you are still reluctant to keep playing then by all means take it back.  FO3 is a game that most people either really like or really don't, and the way the game was marketed and the way people talked about it ended up dragging in a lot of people for whom FO3 was not a good match.  There is certainly nothing wrong with deciding that this isn't the game for you, I've played plenty of games that got high praise from both critics and players and ended up wondering why.

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