What exactly does the xbox one do to determine that nat is open?

Hi Xbox support

What exactly does the xbox one do to determine that NAT is open?

I have noticed that on my firewall, which is running Linux, a rule is added to the NAT table - often udp 3074, but not always.

If i let my UPNP daemon add the NAT entry the xbox reports NAT as open, but no packages/traffic hits the nat rule, do what exactly does the xbox one do to determine NAT status.

Regards

csMax

 

Question Info


Last updated July 4, 2018 Views 44 Applies to:

Hello, csMax!

I am not an Official Xbox Representative but will still try to assist.

Most of the time the NAT status on the Xbox One console is determined by network strength and the speed of the network (if the speed is below the recommended the NAT may be moderate or strict)

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^^ network strength really has nothing to do with NAT.  It is a rather detailed subject and it would probably be best just to Google it.  

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Hi csMAx,

I'm not Xbox support, but I'll do my best to accommodate you in your request.

[quote user="csMax"]What exactly does the xbox one do to determine that NAT is open?[/quote]Let's take STUN (Session Traversal Utilities for NAT), as the most known tool that provides a means for how an application discover and diagnose the presence and type of NAT/firewalls, as an additional layer between the application and the Internet-at-large.

Applications that somewhat needs to initiate peer relationships, first has to determine if it's operating behind NAT/firewall. In other words, it has to have an understanding of the IP:Port that might exist in a NAT binding. Thus being private IP to public IP binding. 

To solve this, an application which runs of an client machine take use of the STUN protocol, to send out a request to a well known STUN server. The request in layman terms ask the STUN server; What is the IP and Port that were used to send you this query. The receiving STUN server decapsulate the packet, inspects the clients IP:Port address, and respond back with this "reflexive" address (mapped address) in its payload.

When NAT is detected between the STUN client and the STUN server, meaning that the packet is altered in transit, the binding is to be accomplished between the NAT device and the STUN server. In such case, it's also important for applications that rely on peer communication to have an understanding of the NAT type it has to transit through.

To determine and diagnose NAT type, the STUN server reply to the initial binding with a different IP:Port, expecting to receive a query from the client, using the initial mapped address tuples. If success, the NAT type is then diagnosed as a full cone NAT. Full cone NAT is very similar to how NAT works (one to many). Where full cone NAT can multiplex many hosts to one mapped address tuples.

In camparison to the Xbox 360, the Xbox One plays a bit different role, in the way it diagnose and discover NAT. The Xbox 360 uses a modified or custome made version of STUN. Where the Xbox One rely on the Teredo protocol for the same process.

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