Difficulties setting up static IP address

Hello, I am trying to open my NAT on Xbox 360. I am using a Linksys E3000 and am directly connecting my Xbox to my laptop. I have previously received an Open NAT on this system with this router before (albeit with an automatic IP address), so I know my hardware is capable of managing multiple IPs.

 

The Xbox automatically assigns 192.168.0.xxx for my IP address, and automatically assigns 192.168.0.1 for my gateway. However, the number I type in to access my router administration (and the gateway address listed under my laptop's ipconfig in the command panel) is 192.168.1.1, and the Port Range Forwarding IP addresses/ DMZ destinations on my router requires the first three parts of the IP Address to be 192.168.1.xxx. If both of the numbers are 0, then my Xbox connects to the Internet, but has a moderate NAT; if I change any of those numbers to 1, I cannot connect to the network whatsoever.

 

I am careful to choose an IP which is not inside my DHCP range, if that makes a difference. I have already entered the ports to forward on my network admin and have enabled DMZ. I am certain the problem lies with the static IP address, and am utterly confused why my Xbox wants to connect to a different gateway than what my computer uses. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Question Info


Last updated July 4, 2018 Views 4 Applies to:

In this setup your computer is acting as a router for your xbox.  The e3000 doesn't even know that the xbox exists, all it sees is the computer.  So basically what you need to do is forward ports for the computer and hope that there is nothing on the computer itself that is causing the NAT warning.  And instead of doing a static IP address, it's best to use DHCP reservation on the router's config page.

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Hi,

If you are connecting your Xbox to your laptop I would recommend using bridging instead of ICS (Internet connection sharing)

 

support.microsoft.com/.../978618

www.unofficialguidetolive.co.uk/xbox-ics-bridging-guide

 

 

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Sorry about the delayed response. Thank you both for your help. While I think this is completely irrelevant, I should mention that UPnP has been enabled throughout.

Okay, I've been completely idiotic in fiddling with my Xbox's IP Address, and went ahead and entered my computer's NAT into both port forwarding and DMZ (thank you, ChimpZealot, for answering that). DMZ works for opening the NAT, while port forwarding does not. Seeing as this DMZ exception entails my computer as well as a 360 with credit card information, I'm assuming that it's not wise to leave it enabled (even though I have Norton, NoScript, and Request Policy). If DMZ works but port forwarding does not, that's probably because of Norton or a firewall accessed from the router.

I tried bridging the connection as Shad0wmanUK suggested, and the computer (which runs Windows XP) was able to bridge the network, but after doing so my computer lost connectivity to the Internet (even though I had set all network settings to Automatic on the 360). I'm guessing it's because I registered this computer and the console on a college network, and the resulting program probably prevented network bridging.

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Yeah, you definitely don't want to leave the computer in the DMZ, but you don't need to worry about the 360 (even if all 360 traffic wasn't encrypted, credit card information isn't stored on the console but rather the XBL servers).

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Ok first up putting your PC in a DMZ to get this working is a very bad idea, you are stripping away your routers protection and potentially exposing your PC unnecessarily.


As for the loss of connectivity after bridging yes that can happen, which of the two links I posted did you follow? The first one doesn't cover promiscuous mode, can you try bridging again and if it fails do this:-

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302348

 

9 out of 10 times that sorts it. Also I take it there's no way to wire the Xbox direct to the Linksys? Is it in another room or something.

 

EDIT: Also just to add if you are using Norton that will cause a problem however you do this and you will have to find out at some point how to open it up for the Xbox Live ports

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I ended up following the first link, didn't have to go to the command prompt, and was able to bridge the connection (I fiddled with Norton to allow my Xbox full access, turned off the router's firewall, and labeled the Xbox360's IP address/gateway as automatic), thereby opening my NAT. However, I'm still experiencing serious lag (although not quite as bad as it was on a Moderate NAT) on Black Ops: although my ping rates at about 40 ms with about 15 ms jitter and 0% packet loss (rating B at pingtest.net, which is supposed to be satisfactory for gaming), I still keep getting three bar connections which continue to be interrupted (killcams consistently show my character about 1.5 seconds behind). I opened the recommended ports for Black Ops specifically via portforwarding.com, but that didn't seem to help.

Maybe the problem is that the Xbox is on the other side of the house from the router (although I was able to perform a shared connection between the Xbox and the same laptop in a 9th floor dormitory at college, which resulted in excellent connections). Maybe the problem is that Black Ops servers often encompass players I search for to be under 50 ms, and the jitter regularly takes me above that threshold.

For the record, the ports I have opened are (all use both UDP and TCP):

53, 80, 88, 3074 (recommended ports for Xbox Live from Microsoft)

3478-4380, 27000-27050 (recommended ports for Black Ops from portforward.com)

1863 (recommended for Video Kinect)

3330

Sorry if this isn't the appropriate place to resolve this issue, but I'm curious if opening other ports even after my NAT says open will help lag issues.

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Hi,

 

No its fine to ask. NAT is not linked to lag so opening ports won't help it. Yes the lag could well be down to the distance between your Xbox/PC to the router, you could try changing wireless channels on the router to see if that would help.

 

The only real way to know if its lagging because of your wireless bridged connection or whether its your ISP is to test the Xbox wired direct to the router or modem

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NAT can be linked to lag especially when it's a level of NAT that an Xbox 360 Console cannot detect. However I doubt that is what's causing the lag in this scenario (Also there is such a thing as 'invisible' NAT where just because the Xbox doesn't see it, doesn't mean it's not getting NAT errors).

Also do -NOT- forward the ports for those Black Ops ports. You only need UDP/TCP 3074 (LIVE), UDP 88 (Kerberos), and UDP/TCP 53 (DNS). The ports on PortForward.com are incorrect as it was a mistake by Activision they were ever listed.

Since you are seeing lag in the form of lag spikes I would almost assume that there may be other devices that could cause issues. Things like high-end headsets (Like the Turtle Beach x31 set) can cause some crazy lag. I've seen BlueTooth headsets also cause random lag as well.

I would like to point out though, you might as well as DMZ the console and leave it as an ICS setup. Your computer will still get internet while the console is connected AND you already shut off the router's firewall and gave the Xbox 360 full access. The DMZ only bypasses the router's security settings and if they're off, why not just DMZ it. That also seemed to give you the best results. I don't like suggesting the idea of putting a computer in a DMZ, but if you have all the security on the router off anyway, then it doesn't really matter.

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I'm not sure what your referring to Thanaduos, you can lag with a perfectly Open NAT,  you can lag with a strict or moderate NAT, lag is lag. Even if/when the Xbox uses ipv6 and doesn't use NAT you can still get lag.

Are you saying you have come across a real world instance where an Xbox was lagging and then you made changes on the router to Open the NAT and the lag stopped? If so its certainly not something I have ever come across, so it would be good to have details on it

IMO the two are mutually exclusive, Xbox NAT is how reachable you are to other players, lag is delay/latency

As for the OP. You are making quite drastic changes to your router in terms of turning off the firewall, I wouldn't recommend doing that nor should you have to. I would connect the Xbox direct to the modem as a test, if it works fine you know its all down to your set-up and you can work from there. If it still lags when direct to the modem the issue is with your ISP and any further changes on your own network are a waste really.

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A firewall can cause the Xbox 360 console to jump through more hoops then needed to reach Xbox LIVE and when you disable it, that restriction is removed. A direct-modem-connection is definitely the best step to ever take in a case of lag as that rules out so many potential issues.

As for NAT, yes, I have seen many things happen due to NAT problems in real-world scenarios. Lag and NAT are definitely seperate, but I have seen cases where someone is lagging because of NAT and other cases where people lag enough that the console thinks it has a NAT problem but it is really just fragmentation of data that confuses the console.

Nothing is impossible :)

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