Console hardware needs to evolve

I was reading an article on how Microsoft would be releasing a new console next year.  Featuring upgraded storage and an upgraded controller. It got me thinking about an article that was floating about, around Xbox One launch. It was said that we would be seeing a much shorter console lifecycle, as Microsoft aims to keep the Xbox One closer in tow to their mobile market refresh and, due, to a rapidly evolving mobile market in general.  Sure, like the Xbox 360, Microsoft agrees to support the One for ten years, but, naturally, this doesn't have to mean that a new console can't come out in under 5 years.  There is a gaming tablet out there as we speak, it is able to push Xbox One fidelity. I believe it is called "The Razor." Sure, it's expensive, but it is proof that the mobile market is just around the corner from current gen hardware. In fact, the Jaguars in the PS4 and Xbox One are little more than tablet processors, based upon the AMD Fusion mobile APU technology.

Why doesn't Microsoft just upgrade the APU and ESRAM in the next iteration of console? And market it as Xbox One Pro, or something? It wouldn't hurt. They could adopt a new model where if you have an Xbox One, for example, you play Halo 5 at 1080p or certain other games at 900p, but on the newer console, you can game closer to 4K and/ or have better post processing etc. And just refresh the hardware ever 2-3 years. For those that are all about graphics, they can upgrade, if you are happy with where you're at, you're good with the Xbox One for 10 years...granted, you're okay with the scaled down graphics. I mean, you're playing the same discs and digital downloads, but the graphics scale upon specs.

 

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Last updated July 4, 2018 Views 0 Applies to:

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And you think it can be still called a console.....

A Steam machine at best....

This gen will last 6-8 years at best...No need to spend extra money on some hybrid.

The writing is already on the wall that this will happen with the MS announcement that the Xbox brand will no longer be just the console.

Rather than MS releasing new consoles it'll be downloading the Xbox OS via the Xbox app in Win 10 and using your hardware to play Xbox games. They increase their player base/sales without having to lose money on hardware production.

Problem will be the backlash from the segment of the community that doesn't understand this has absolutely no impact on their Xbox One or their gaming experience.

Tzar of Chaos

Just what exactly is a console these days anyway? We all know it's basically just an x86 PC anymore.

Randver

Oh I see...yeah. The whole future of streaming your OS and games and you don't own anything, just pay subscription services.  Yeah, I'm not particularly keen on that idea. I do like the idea that I own something. I like the idea that I can still play offline should services go down or my ISP wig out on me...I just like the convenience of it.  DDOS attacks and service issues are not uncommon these days. I like stability.  I was *** when I found out I couldn't play Dragon Age Inquisition offline, without being signed into my profile, the last time Microsoft was hit with attacks. It's incredibly lame; I open the game, I get to the menu, it has me sign into my profile, it fails to sign in and it returns me back at the starting screen. Couldn't even play campaign.

I just don't get this mentality.  Then what stops the competitors from doing the same?  Then you have a neverending cycle.  

Not only that but then you put a touch a of pressure on developers to build for a different variants.

Why not just play on PC?  Where you can do this.

Let home consoles be home consoles.  Let Mobile Devices be mobile devices, and PC'S be personal computers.  

A console doesn't have hardware upgrade....What is inside stays inside.

@NxtDoc

Consoles have stopped being consoles. The console crowd wants all the things you can do on the PC (web browsing, music, movies, apps, etc) yet they still want to believe they have just a gaming  console.

I would love for both my consoles to just play games just like the old days. Just focus on what they do that nothing else can but the console owners want more and by doing so have evolved into something else.

[quote user="Staarlord"]

I was reading an article on how Microsoft would be releasing a new console next year.  Featuring upgraded storage and an upgraded controller. It got me thinking about an article that was floating about, around Xbox One launch. It was said that we would be seeing a much shorter console lifecycle, as Microsoft aims to keep the Xbox One closer in tow to their mobile market refresh and, due, to a rapidly evolving mobile market in general.

[/quote]

Well no.

I was here for the launch and that's not what was being said at all.

Randver i believe you misinterpreted my post.

I understand that home consoles have become low to mid level PC's.  My point is the comfort and convenience of home consoles is just that.  Sit down, put a disc in or launch a digital copy and play.  An easy accessible community and features.  For roughly 8 years I won't have to do anything other than download an update.  

What the OP is talking about is silliness in my opinion.  As I said, then what stops the competitors from doing the same.  Then it becomes a cycle.  

Remember Sega?  Yeah... Let's go down that road of constant upgrades again.  

Maybe you didn't notice but Xbox one can play games (and only games if you want to).

I still call my TV,a TV even if i can web browsing,apps,ect....But i don't call it a PC.

@NxtDoc

That wouldn't need to change. The simplicity of the device is in the OS not the actual hardware.

I see the future as being Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo, etc simply having a client that allows you to download and play their games on whatever device you choose.

Sooner or later we'll be 100% digital and it doesn't make sense for the companies to keep producing hardware that in some cases is losing money (production cost vs sale price) when a digital distribution network is significantly more profitable.

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