2011 Xbox 360 Networking Guide

Welcome to my unofficial Xbox 360 Networking Guide. This guide started as a summary of frequently asked questions that appeared on the Australian Xbox Live forums, and over the years has developed with the assistance of community members asking questions that were not in the original guide. This has led to a much, much, longer and more detailed guide. With the release of the new Xbox forums, I have updated it yet again to include pictures and revised several sections with more in-depth tutorials.

As always, if you have any questions that are not answered, or there are any errors, please post on the thread or contact me directly via PM or via Xbox Live. Your feedback helps to develop more informative documentation which will hopefully help others in the future.

When writing this guide, I aimed at providing assistance for people with a diverse range of technical skills. As a result there are sections which are fairly basic and written to provide an introduction to networking, which leads to some more advanced troubleshooting techniques, and most sections will reference others for clarification.

This will hopefully assist in developing a wider awareness of networking and troubleshooting techniques. As the old saying goes: "'Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime". 

 



Table of Contents

1.    What is a Network?

2.    What are Wireless Local Area Networks (WiFi)?

3.    What are Wired Networks?

4.    What is the difference between a modem, router, switch and hub?

5.    What are the differences between Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6, Straight through and Crossover Cables?

6.    Which are better, wired or wireless networks?

7.    Xbox 360 network adaptors

8.    Can I use a 3rd Party Wireless Adaptor in my Xbox 360?

9.    How do I test my Xbox Live Connection?

10. What is NAT, and why is mine strict (or moderate)?

11. What is MTU, and why is it stopping me from connecting to Xbox Live?

12. What is an IP Address, and what's the difference between Static and Dynamic (DHCP)?

13. What is a firewall, and how to I open the ports needed for an Xbox Live Connection? 

14. Windows Firewall is causing an issue with Internet Connection Sharing 

15. Can I use my laptop's wireless LAN/ Internet to connect to Xbox Live

16. Can I link multiple Xbox 360 Consoles using an Ethernet cable or Wireless?

17. Media Sharing from your Windows PC. 

18. How does Xbox Live affect my Download Speeds and Cap/Quota?

19. How does Foxtel on Xbox 360 work?  

20. What is the difference between a Mb and a MB?

 

 


 

 


 

Question Info


Last updated July 4, 2018 Views 349 Applies to:

 

1.    What is a network?


A 'Network' is a term commonly used to describe two or more computing devices linked together to share information.

There are a lot of networking types, including Local Area Networks (LAN), Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN), and Wide Area Networks (WAN). This guide only covers LANs, using wired Ethernet and Wireless. A LAN is generally a network used in a home or small/medium business scenario. 

Networking is governed by protocols, or 'rules'. These rules ensure that a standard 'language' is achieved so different devices can talk to one another and understand what each is saying. The most common LAN protocol is TCP/IP, which is the one we will cover.  

Although you don't need to know how TCP/IP works, it may be handy to know that it takes data and breaks it down into small chunks called packets (or datagrams). These packets contain information such as the destination, size and the data itself, which are sent to the destination device over the network. The packet has a maximum size, but can be altered by setting the MTU (see Q11).


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2.    What are Wireless Local Area Networks (WiFi)?


WiFi once stood for Wireless Fidelity, and referred to Wireless b standard networks. It has now been adopted as a general terminology for all Wireless Ethernet LANs, and is no longer considered to be an acronym. Wireless LANs are networks which operate on Wireless Radio Frequencies (similar to walkie-talkies or CB-Radios). 

A base-station (or access-point) is connected to a wired network, and is used to send and receive data between the wired network and the wireless devices. 


There are a variety of wireless standards a/b/g/n, although we only cover g and n standards:

Wireless G:

  • Has a reported indoor range of 35-38 meters, not taking into account interference from walls, electrical devices etc. 
  • Reported transfer speed for Wireless G is 54Mbps


 Wireless N:

  • Uses MIMO (multiple in, multiple out). It uses multiple antennae to broadcast and receive signals.
  • Has a reported range of up to 70m indoors with Channel Bonding Enabled (35-38 without), not taking into account environmental interference. 
  • Reported transfer speed of 300Mbps, although speeds around 190Mbps are more common. 

 
Wireless networks are baseband, which means that only one signal can be sent at a time. The network's bandwidth is divided among the number of devices connected to the network (eg 3 devices connected to 190Mbps Wireless Network would result in 63.3Mbps connection speeds per device). The more devices connected to a wireless network, the longer each device has to wait to send data, which results in congestion and slower performance. 
 
WiFi uses CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access Collision Avoidance) to prevent collision of data packets being sent across the network by only allowing one device to send data at a time. It's easiest to think of WiFi as a 'talking stick' as other devices must wait for the talking stick before they can send data. 


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3.    What are Wired Networks?


Wired Networks are devices connected together via a cable. There are a few standards available, the most common being a 10/100Mbps Fast Ethernet connection. The newest standard in home networking is 100/1000mbps Ethernet (or Gigabit Ethernet), which is not supported by the Xbox 360, although 100/1000mbps is backwards compatible and will throttle the speed to match the device. 


Wired networks use CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access Collision Detection). This basically means that multiple devices can talk at once (no talking stick!). If packets of data 'collide' on the network a jamming signal is sent. All devices stop transmitting before resuming normal operation. 
 
Wired 10/100Mbps has an optimal transfer speed of 100Mbps. Unlike wireless, all devices maintain the highest internal network speed, with the internet bandwidth being the main cause for internet latency, if another device is sharing the same network connection.


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4.    What is the difference between a modem, router, switch and hub?


wired modem is a device that is used to connect a device to the internet. Older dialup modems were inbuilt into some computers, and are not recommended for Xbox Live. Many DSL/ADSL modems incorporate a switch, allowing multiple devices to share the internet connection and are referred to as a modem/router. 
 
A switch is a device which allows multiple users to connect to a network. The network may or may not be connected to the internet. A switch is generally viewed as superior to a hub, as any packets of data that it receives are sent only to the device it was addressed to. This also increases security. 
 
hub is a device similar to a switch, allowing multiple devices to connect to a network. The hub may or may not be connected to the internet. The main issue with hubs is they create unnecessary congestion, by broadcasting packets to all devices connected, decreasing security. 


A router is the basic building block of the internet. Routers are a special-purpose device designed to interconnect networks, passing data from its source network to the destination network. Each router maintains a 'routing table', which is essentially an address book, containing information on network locations. A router will examine each packet of data, and compare the destination address with the routing table. If the router knows where to send the packet, it will forward on the data. If there is no information in the routing table for the destination, the router will drop the packet. Today, routers are generally built into many home DSL modems.
 
If you have a modem, which has only a single Ethernet port, you can expand the amount of ports by purchasing a separate switch or wireless router. The internet connection can then be shared between multiple devices on the wired or wireless network. 


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5. What are the differences between Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6, Straight through and Crossover Cables?
 
Microsoft commonly refers to RJ-45 Cat-5 cable, simply as "network cable", which can be confusing when people go out and purchase the cables. 
 
Network cables come in all sorts, such as Coaxial, RJ-45 STP/UTP, Fibre Optic etc. The Xbox 360 uses RJ-45 Cat5/5e/6 cable, so you don't have to worry about the other cabling types. The cables come in a range of colours and lengths- so to save confusion they can generally be identified by the writing on the cable jacket.


To rule out any misunderstandings regarding the different category RJ-45 cables, Category 5 (Cat-5) cable is used for 10/100mbps networks, and Cat5e/6 was developed for newer 100/1000mbps networks.


The Xbox 360 Ethernet adaptor is 10/100mbps, but can use all cable types as Cat5e/6 cable is backwards compatible. A Cat5/5e/6 cable can be connected directly into the Ethernet port on the Xbox 360. The other end is typically plugged into a switch, hub or modem/router. 


Straight through (standard patch) cables are just as they sound. A cable which has two identical plugs on both ends, and is suitable for all purposes, with the exception of system-linking original Xbox consoles, two computers etc.  




Cro
ssover cables have wiring which is ordered differently each end, and allows for two devices (such as two original Xbox consoles or computers) to be directly connected to one another without the use of a switching device. 

 

The Xbox 360 is an exception to the above rule, as it uses autosensing crossover detectors. This allows you to use either a Straight through or Crossover cable to system-link.

 

When purchasing a network cable for your Xbox 360 console, there is no sense in purchasing the more expensive Cat-6 cables, as you will achieve the same performance with the cheaper Cat5/5e cables and, depending on the length, there can be a significant price difference.

 

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6. Which are better, Wired or Wireless networks?

Wired networks have always been viewed as superior to wireless networks, as they are considered faster and more reliable. 
 
The introduction of Wireless N has increased the range and speed of wireless technologies, theoretically shortening the gap between the two standards, but is still restricted to the 'talking stick' method (See Q2)
 
As a result, the more devices connected to your wireless network, the more congested your network will become. Wireless is also highly susceptible to interference from electrical devices such as microwaves, cordless phones, as well as walls, furniture etc. 
 
If you are only able to use wireless for your Xbox 360 networking- there are a few things you can do to improve performance:

  • Try and restrict the number of walls, doors and furniture between your Xbox 360 and the Access Point.
  • Disconnect devices which do not need to be connected to your wireless network (including mobile phones, laptops etc). 
  • Try not to download or transfer large files across your network on other devices while playing on Xbox Live or streaming media.
  • If using a Wireless N adaptor, enable Channel Bonding.
  • Turn off, or try not to use electrical devices, such as microwaves, clothes dryers etc. that may interfere with your wireless signal while playing on Xbox Live or streaming media (microwave the popcorn BEFORE watching the movie!).

 

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7. Xbox 360 network adaptors

Xbox 360 Core/Arcade/Pro/Elite Consoles- These models are no longer available to purchase new, but many Xbox 360 owners still have these consoles. These models all shipped with an on-board 10/100mbps Ethernet adaptor, and wireless as an optional accessory.


                        

 

A Wireless G USB Adaptor was initially released, and was later replaced by a Wireless N USB Adaptor

 
Xbox 360S Console
- This is the current 360 model, with the same on-board 10/100mbps Ethernet adaptor as the previous models. This model has been revised though, with an internal Wireless N adaptor. 
 
You can find more information on setting up your Xbox 360 Network connections here:

 

 

                                                                                    

 

Step-by-Step Wireless Connection       Step-by-Step Wired Connection



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8. Can I use a 3rd Party Wireless Adaptor in my Xbox 360?

Before you read the rest of this section, I encourage you to Google "third party Xbox 360 wireless adaptor". You will soon see the multitude of problems that people have experienced trying to use these devices, and it may quickly change your mind.
 
There are a few alternate options available to you, including Wireless G gateways and print servers. These devices plug into your Ethernet port on the Xbox 360, and act as an 'interpreter' between your wireless network and the Xbox 360. These devices are not supported by Microsoft.
 
Third party adaptors were once an appealing alternative to some people, who were not comfortable purchasing an official Wireless G Adaptor for AU$149.95. 
 
Today, the official Wireless G adaptors can be purchased for less than most of the 3rd party adaptors, and the official Wireless N adaptors offer performance that is un-matched by 3rd party print servers.


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9. How do I test my Xbox Live Connection? 


Testing your Xbox Live connection is an excellent tool for troubleshooting, as it will not only identify where a problem may be occurring, but will also alert you to connection issues such as NAT restrictions.

You can perform an Xbox Live Connection Test by following these steps:

Test Xbox Live Connection:

  1. Turn on your console, press the Guide button on your controller and browse to the far right tab.
  2. Select System Settings
  3. Select Network Settings
  4. Select either the Wired Network or Wireless Network you are connecting to
  5. Select Test Xbox Live Connection

You will be prompted to sign out of Xbox Live while the test is performed. If there are any issues during the test, you will receive an error message. 

 

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10. What is NAT, and why is mine strict (or moderate)?
 
If you are: experiencing severe latency while playing online games; having trouble joining games or other players chat is silent or garbled, you may be experiencing a NAT problem. You can check this by using the Xbox 360's connection test utility (Q9).


NAT (Network Address Translation) was developed in response to the lacking number of IP addresses available on the internet. 

All servers for mail, websites, file servers etc. have an IP address- (e.g. 192.167.0.1) but the addresses have started running out.  
 
As a quick fix, NAT was introduced, to allow multiple users to share the one IP address. The idea is that a packet is sent to an address, and when it arrives is redirected to its actual address (and vice versa). 
 
Xbox Live doesn't like NAT, as it causes numerous issues. To fix the issue, there are a few steps you can take. If you are experiencing problems with your network, you should always try the simplest solution first. This includes power cycling and checking for conflicting devices on your network.


Power-cycling/ Checking for conflicting devices:

  1. Turn off all your networking hardware, and any devices connected to it (including your PC etc). 
  2. Wait 2-3 minutes, and then turn your modem/router back on.
  3. Turn on your Xbox 360, while leaving all other devices on the network turned off.
  4. Perform the Xbox Live Connection Test.
  5. If the connection test is successful, continue to 6. If you are still experiencing issues please see Q13.
  6. Progressively turn on all your devices that utilise the network connection, waiting approximately 1-2 minutes between each device. This gives the network devices a chance to talk to one another and establish a connection.
  7. Perform the Xbox Live Connection Test again 
  8. If you are still experiencing issues, your issue may be caused by blocked ports. A solution for this issue can be found at Question 13.


Keep in mind that if you have been running Xbox Live with no problems, and it is giving you the error out of the blue it could be an Xbox Live server problem. Before you go changing any settings, check the Xbox Live Support website first for news. MTU and NAT errors are common when the Xbox Live servers are playing up.
 

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11. What is MTU, and why is it stopping me from connecting to Xbox Live? 
 
MTU is Maximum Transmission Unit, and refers to the maximum size of the datagram or 'packet' being sent over the network. All routers or devices will have an MTU set (including your Xbox 360). The largest size of a packet for TCP/IP is 1500. 
 
Each time a datagram passes through a router, it must be smaller or equal to its MTU. 
 
If you set the MTU too high, it will have to be fragmented, which will eventually result in congestion and/or dropped (lost) packets, resulting in a bad connection.  
 
Alternatively, if you set the MTU too low, you will be sending an unnecessary amount of packets, resulting in congestion and a bad connection. 
 
If you are receiving errors when attempting to connect to Xbox Live, first check to make sure your MTU on your Xbox 360 is set around 1460. Personally, I would not put the MTU above 1500 or below 1390, as you will create issues for yourself!
 
If you still receive errors, check your router's settings, and make sure that the Xbox 360's settings and your routers settings both have matching MTU. This will prevent any unnecessary fragmentation. 

If you are having issues trying to find the settings in your modem/router, post here with your model number and we can try and help you out. 


Keep in mind that if you have been running Xbox Live with no problems, and it is giving you the error out of the blue it could be an Xbox Live server problem. Before you go changing any settings, check the
Xbox Live Support website first for news. MTU and NAT errors are common when the Xbox Live servers are playing up.


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12. What is an IP Address, and what's the difference between Static and Dynamic (DHCP)?

An IP address is an 
Internet Protocol Address, and is similar to your house address. It is used in conjunction with the physical MAC address of a device to determine where a data packet should be sent. 
 
Static IP Address is an address that is reserved for a particular device. This is set both on the device, and on the router. Static IP addresses are handy if you want to open ports for a certain device, but not for others. 
 
Dynamic IP Address is assigned when a device connects to the network. This is useful if you have multiple devices connecting to your network, which do not require any in-depth configuration. 

 
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13. What is a firewall, and how to I open the ports needed for an Xbox Live Connection? 

The easiest way to define a firewall is as a hardware device or software program designed to inspect network traffic and either allow traffic to pass through or deny and block according to a set of rules. This is similar to the door on your house- which keeps out any unwanted guests. The purpose for a firewall is very simple- protect the network or computer from outside access.



Firewalls can be standalone, but are more commonly incorporated into home modem/routers. For a firewall to be effective, it must be configured properly, and unfortunately most home users are unaware of the firewall settings built into their devices, relying on the default settings.


While the default settings are generally setup for basic protection, this can pose an issue for services such as Xbox Live, which utilises several ports usually blocked by firewalls. This can result in a reported strict or moderate NAT (see Q8), poor network performance, inability to connect to online games, and quiet or garbled voice chat.


To fix these issues, it is as simple as opening the ports:


TCP 80
UDP 88
UDP 3074
TCP 3074
UDP 53
TCP 52


This can be done through your modem/router web interface, by following these steps:


1.    On your Windows PC, hit the Start/Windows button, and type in cmd in the text box.

 

2.    In the window that opens, type in IPCONFIG and press ENTER.

 

3.    Make a note of the Default Gateway address, which can be used to access the web interface of your modem/router.

4.    Enter the address into your web browser address bar, and login using the username and password provided with your hardware (either on the bottom of the modem/router or in the documentation provided). The default username and password are both generally admin, although this differs with some manufacturers.

5.    Once logged into your web interface, follow the directions here at portforward.com


As there are literally thousands of modem/router models, it is not practical to post the directions for each here.  Port Forward is a web site designed to give you step-by-step directions for setting up your specific hardware. The above link will take you to a dedication section for setup of your hardware for Xbox Live. If your model modem/router is not listed on the above website, please post here with your model number, and I will provide you with the steps.


For additional information, you can read Microsoft's support page here

 

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14.  Windows Firewall is causing an issue with Internet Connection Sharing 

If Windows Firewall is causing connection problems with Internet Connection Sharing, first try the following solution:


  1. Check whether or not your Windows Based PC is able to connect to the Internet. You should be able to establish a connection with the Xbox connected to your laptop. If not, make sure that Internet Connection Sharing enabled (See Q15 for more information on ICS). 
  2. Click on the Start button on your Windows PC, and type ncpa.cpl (if you are using a pre-Vista version of Windows, choose Run from the Start menu and type ncpa.cpl)
  3.  In the new window Network Connections that has opened, select View or More Options (depending on your version of Windows) and change to Tiled. Each connection will now show detailed information under the icon. Check to see if the connection is listed as "Firewalled". 


If your connection(s) are shown as Firewalled, view this guide from Microsoft to find out how to manually configure Windows and non-Windows Firewalls.


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15. Can I use my laptop's wireless LAN/ Internet connection to connect to Xbox Live?
            
Yes! 

You can use your Windows PC and Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) to enable your Xbox 360 to connect to Xbox Live using your PC's Internet connection. Before starting, make sure that your Xbox 360 console is not yet connected to your computer.


1.    On your Windows based PC, select the Start/Windows button, and type in ncpa.cpl. On earlier versions of Windows, you may need to choose Run from the Start menu, and type in ncpa.cpl


2.    This will open your Network Connections window, with all your network devices. Find the device that you use to connect your Windows PC to the Internet, right click on the icon and select properties.


3.    A new window will open, oddly enough, showing the properties for the network connection. Select the Sharing tab, and click the check box Allow other network users to connect through this computer's internet connection.

4.    Click OK and wait for the network connection icon to change to shared.


Once your done, open your preferred web browser, and check to make sure you can load a webpage. If you can, you're good to move onto the next step. If not, check to make sure that you have selected the right network connection (the one you are using to connect to the internet, not the network adaptor you are using to connect to the Xbox 360).


5.    If the connection is working correctly, turn on your Xbox 360 and press the Guide button on your controller.

6.    Browse to the System Settings option in the far right blade.

7.    Open the Network Settings,  select Wired Network, and then Additional Settings.

8.    There will be an option to Restore to Factory Defaults which will revert your network settings to automatic, if not already done.

9.    Once you have performed the above, you can plug in your cat-5/5e/6 cable between your PC and your Xbox 360 console, and you should be good to go.


 If you have problems after following the guide above, try the following:

1.    On your Windows based PC, select the Start/Windows button, and type in cmd, or Run from the Start menu on earlier versions of Windows, and type in cmd.

2.    In the console window, type in ipconfig and take note of your IP address, Gateway (DNS), and Subnet. 

3.    On your Xbox 360 console, Browse to the System Settings option in the far right blade.

4.    Open the Network Settings, select Wired Network, and then Configure Network.

5.    Under Basic Settings set your IP Settings to the following:

a.    IP Address- Something that isn't being used by your PC or your gateway. For example, if your gateway is 192.168.0.1 try to set it to something in the realm of 192.168.0.3 to 192.168.0.254

b.    Subnet - Usually 255.255.255.0

c.    DNS- This should be set as the gateway address

d.    Secondary DNS- This can be set either the same as the primary DNS or just left blank.

6.    After entering in all the above settings, press the B button on your controller and then follow Q9 How do I test my Xbox Live Connection


If it doesn't work straight away, try giving your PC a restart. 

If you are still having problems, it may be due to a Windows Firewall issue. See
Q14 for more information.


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16.  Can I link multiple Xbox 360 Consoles using an Ethernet cable or Wireless?

Yes! 

You can connect:
*Four Xbox 360 consoles together with Wireless Ethernet Adaptors
*Two Xbox 360 consoles with either an Ethernet cable, or
*Multiple Xbox 360 consoles with a router. 

You can read up on  how to system link here

 

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17. Media Sharing from your Windows PC. 
            
Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows Vista Home Premium, Windows Vista Ultimate and Windows 7 operating systems include a program called Windows Media Centre. 

The idea of Windows Media Center, is that it acts as a server for all of your media, sharing your libraries with your Xbox 360 as an 'extender'. Windows Media Center also allows you to stream Live TV, as well as pause, rewind and record Live TV directly to your computer from the comfort of your couch. Please note that in order to use the Live TV feature, your computer will require a TV Capture Card. These cards can be purchased as add-ons, and allow you to plug an aerial cable from into your computer to receive an analogue or digital TV signal (depending on what services are available to your area).  


 There are often a lot of questions regarding setup of Windows Media Center, so after you have followed the following, free to post and ask away.

1.    On your Windows PC, click the Start/Windows button

2.    Click on All Programs and then select Windows Media Center. On Windows XP, select All Programs> Accessories>Media Center. Alternatively, you can just type Windows Media Center into the search bar on the Start menu.

3.    If it is your first time using Windows Media Center, you have the choice of either selecting Express setup or Custom setup. If you have already setup Windows Media Center, go to Q4.

*Express setup will automatically add your media libraries to Windows Media Center, and (if a TV Capture Card is installed) will download the information for your Live TV service.

*Custom setup will check for networking/ internet connections and will give you the options to setup additional features. These include choosing optimal display, speakers, media libraries and TV tuners if one is installed.

If you initially choose Custom setup, you can always customise your settings within Windows Media Center by selecting Tasks>Settings. If you wish to run the entire setup process again, you can select Tasks>Settings>General>Windows Media Center Setup> Run Setup Again

4.    Once your Windows Media Center has been setup, go to Tasks>add extender. Click Next, and when prompted to enter an 8-digit setup key head over to your Xbox 360 console.

5.    Turn on your Xbox 360 console, and press the Guide button on your controller.

 

6.    Scroll right to the Media Tab and then choose Windows Media Center.

7.    Select Continue and you will be prompted with an 8-digit number.

8.    Go back to your PC, and continue setup by entering in the number given above. Click Next  and follow the on-screen prompts to complete the setup process.


If your Xbox 360 console has previously been setup with another computer to user Windows Media Center, or to remove an Xbox 360 console or other extender from your Windows Based pc follow Knowledge Base article 932208.


If your computer does not have Windows Media Center you can download a copy (or reinstall a copy) here (www.xbox.com/pcsetup).


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18. How does Xbox Live affect my Download Speeds and Cap/Quota?

 
This is like asking how long a piece of string is. Your usage is entirely dependent on what your Xbox Live activities involve. 

Obviously if you download demos, DLC, stream Zune HD etc. your usage will exceed someone who only plays the occasional multiplayer game. 

Most Internet Service Providers provide a toolbox with a usage meter. Next time you're online, make a note of your usage before and after your gaming session.  Be sure to check that no other devices are sharing your internet connection, or your readings will be incorrect. 

 
If you notice that you are eating through your monthly cap rather quickly, you may want to consider an ISP which doesn't monitor your Xbox Live usage. iiNet is an Australian ISP who include a Freezone in their plans. This Freezone excludes most of your Xbox Live usage from your cap. Be careful though, as some things such as Zune HD and Foxtel are not included in the Freezone

 

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19. How does Foxtel on Xbox 360 work?  

Foxtel on Xbox 360
 is a service that allows many Australian users to view Foxtel on their Xbox 360 console. Currently there are 30 Live TV Channels available, with several packages. More information on pricing and packaged can be viewed here.

This service requires a minimum 1.5mbps Internet connection, Xbox Live for Foxtel on Demand and/or an Xbox Live Gold subscription for Channel Packages. 


The approximate data usage for viewing one hour of Live TV is: 


High Quality: 800MB*

Medium Quality: 540MB*


Low Quality: 360MB*


For Catch Up TV and Foxtel On Demand data, the information is displayed on-screen prior to downloading the content. 


At present, some users are reporting that Telstra Bigpond users are experiencing unmetered usage from Foxtel on Xbox 360. This is yet to be officially confirmed by Telstra, and not all users are reporting unmetered usage. 


More information and frequently asked questions regarding the Foxtel on Xbox 360 service can be found 
here 

 

*Please see Q20 for definition.

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20. What is the difference between a Mb and a MB?

This might sound like an unusual question, but it is often the source for confusion regarding download speeds and quotas. 


A Mb is a Megabit, and is commonly used when describing internet and network transfer speeds. 


A MB is a Megabyte, which is used to describe file sizes etc. 


 There are 8 bits to 1 byte. A theoretical example would be a network speed of 100mbps(Megabits), which would transfer 12.5MB/ps (Megabytes).
 
                                                100/ 8 = 12.5
 
ISP connection speeds for example, advertise ADSL2+ plans with a 25Mb download speed. People expect to receive a 25 Megabyte download speed, where in fact they should expect a maximum of 3.124Megabytes. 

 Please keep in mind that those speeds are completely theoretical, and I am yet to meet a person who actually achieves those speeds, as it is dependent on your location, grade and quality of wiring etc

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T&C: This information is posted as my own opinion, and in know way reflects the opinion of Xbox, the Microsoft corporation or staff associated. Please note that by following this guide, you do so at your own risk, and no liability will be held for issues which may arise. The 'guidebutton.jpg', and avatar images are used courtesy of www.xbox.com. Information given (including cabling and wireless networking) is provided as a recommendation, and you should refer to your local government departments for regulations regarding wireless communication channels etc. 

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Post, that must have taken some time Orbytel so props

 

Don't forget to change the link in your sig mate!

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Cheers Shadowman, yeah took a little while but it was progressive... I just updated it, added pictures and took advantage of the anchors etc this time around ;)

Sig changed ;) didn't even think to update it!

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This post looks great! Just remember, if you'd like to submit any content for stickies, please read the guidelines and make a post here.

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