Question

Q: 1.) NMI: Parity Check/Memory Parity Error on booting WinXp AND 2.) FAILED pre-Windows boot Video Hardware diagnostic test September 1, 2010__

I have aDell Inspiron E1705 laptop with Win XP Pro, SP3 .   I have 2 memory modules of 1 GB each for a total of 2 GB RAM memory. It also has adedicated graphics card: NVIDIA GeForce Go 7800 (which has been replaced with NEW cards of same model TWICE, after they burned out due to its cooling fan failure).

 

The system ran fine for several years until August 30, 2010 when the audio and video became intermittent (breaking up several times each second) until system froze - this happened while I was watching a news VIDEO on FoxNews.com viaAdobe FLASH player .

 

1.) On reboot, the system gets as far as the initial Windows startup screen, then I get the BLUE SCREEN with the following message:

 

***Hardware Malfunction ***

Call your Hardware Vendor for Support.

NMI: Parity Check/Memory Parity Error

***The System has Halted***

 

2.) I ran a BIOS pre-boot HARDWARE DIAGNOSTIC in whichONLY one of the VIDEO tests failed :

Error Code: 5300:0119

Msg: Detected a failure while writing and reading VIDEO MEMORY.Video mode: 0h (320x200x16)  Address A0674h,  expected to read 0h, but read 10000h instead.

 

3.)  In "Safe Mode" I attempted a BIOS flash re-install, then a BIOS flash update, but it fails every time with the message that the"BIOS cannot be installed while a FLASH application is running"  (even though I have opened NO programs)   MP061 BIOS FLASH A09

Application return error:  0x00000610

Windows return error: 0x0000043c

 

4.) Attempt to "restore" the Registry from several working registry backups (made with "Advanced Registry Optimizer 2008" (by SammSoft) and Windows "System Restore" failed to make any changes to the registry.

 

Is this a Virus, Trojan, malware, etc? [Searches for same using McAfee AV, Spyware Doctor,Advanced Registry Optimizer 2008, and other softwarehave yielded nothing that corrects the problem.] A failure of the graphics adapter memory? Interference by a hidden process (FLASH program) running in the background?     THANKS !

 

P.S. I am an advanced user with 25+ years of PC and network administrator experience in large corporations.




Have you not heard of Google in the last 25+ years?

Here is the very first Google search result of:  NMI: Parity Check/Memory Parity Error

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315223

That sounds pretty good to me.

I would politely recommend you stop "trying" things unless you are feeling really lucky!

How are you doing these registry restores and other things if your system will not boot?

I don't think you can flash the BIOS in Safe Mode - how did you do that?  

 

Someone will likely suggest you "test your RAM" but not tell you how to do it, so I will also suggest you test your RAM and also tell you how to do it:

 

Run a test of your RAM with memtest86+ (I know it is boring and will cost you a CD). 

Memtest86+ is a more up to date version of the old memtest86 program and they are not the same.

The memtest86+ will not run under Windows, so you will need to download the ISO file and create a bootable CD, boot on that and then run the memtest86+ program.  

If even a single error is reported that is a failure and should make you suspicious of your RAM.

If you have multiple sticks of RAM you may need to run the test on them one at a time and change them out to isolate the failure to a particular single stick.

Always keep at least the first bank of RAM occupied so the test will find something to do and there is enough to boot your system.

Sometimes, reseating the RAM in the slots will relieve the error but a failure is still cause for suspicion.

The file and instructions are here:

http://www.memtest.org/

Here is a link that shows you have to create and use the memtest86+ CD:

http://www.geekstogo.com/forum/topic/246994-guide-to-using-memtest86/

If someone says to run memtest86, you can tell them to go pound sand and that you know memtest86+ supercedes memtest86 and here's why:  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memtest86

 


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Jose,

I have heard that you can flash BIOS from Windows. I have to find that reference, but with new BIOS it is possible. I haven't flashed in that manner, but always from floppy or CD.

Sometimes I cannot run Windows' Memory Testing Program, but MemTest86+ alway have worked.

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Making sure you do have data backed up, remove memory one card at a time and test it in all available slots.
Second approach is to remove CMOS battery overnight. Then place new CMOS battery. I can't give exact explanation, but on two rare occassions I was able to fix computer and was able to re-flash the BIOS (of course I had backed up all data). CMOS battery usually last for 3 years if computer had been plugged into electrical receptacle wihout starting for weeks at a time. CMOS manufacturer, plus location weathr (high or too low) can affect CMOS lifespan. Have you seen video of a computer catching fire from CMOS (of course slighly old - 10 years ago)?

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.


"JohnHenryHill" wrote in message news:bec16224-9c33-42ce-81b9-c8057cd5093d...

I have aDell Inspiron E1705 laptop withWin XP Pro, SP3 .   I have 2 memory modules of 1 GB each for a total of 2 GB RAM memory. It also has adedicated graphics card: NVIDIA GeForce Go 7800 (which has been replaced with NEW cards of same model TWICE, after they burned out due to its cooling fan failure).

 

 

 

2.) I ran a BIOS pre-boot HARDWARE DIAGNOSTIC in whichONLY one of the VIDEO tests failed :

Error Code: 5300:0119

Msg: Detected a failure while writing and reading VIDEO MEMORY.Video mode: 0h (320x200x16)  Address A0674h,  expected to read 0h, but read 10000h instead.

 


It looks to me as if you have a problem with the graphics hardware - so nothing you do in Windows is going to make ay difference, and flashing the BIOS won't help.
It' not uncommon for high-end laptop hardware to overheat - which is what would seem to nave happened to your first tow graphics cards, and which appears to be happening to this one.
Complain to Dell, and see if you can get them to replace the card again, for free.
 

--


Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
Noel Paton
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi -
No, I don't work for Microsoft!
http://www.crashfixpc.co.uk

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.


What a Richard Rectum.

 

Have you not heard of Google in the last 25+ years?

Here is the very first Google search result of:  NMI: Parity Check/Memory Parity Error

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315223

That sounds pretty good to me.

I would politely recommend you stop "trying" things unless you are feeling really lucky!

How are you doing these registry restores and other things if your system will not boot?

I don't think you can flash the BIOS in Safe Mode - how did you do that?  

 

Someone will likely suggest you "test your RAM" but not tell you how to do it, so I will also suggest you test your RAM and also tell you how to do it:

 

Run a test of your RAM with memtest86+ (I know it is boring and will cost you a CD). 

Memtest86+ is a more up to date version of the old memtest86 program and they are not the same.

The memtest86+ will not run under Windows, so you will need to download the ISO file and create a bootable CD, boot on that and then run the memtest86+ program.  

If even a single error is reported that is a failure and should make you suspicious of your RAM.

If you have multiple sticks of RAM you may need to run the test on them one at a time and change them out to isolate the failure to a particular single stick.

Always keep at least the first bank of RAM occupied so the test will find something to do and there is enough to boot your system.

Sometimes, reseating the RAM in the slots will relieve the error but a failure is still cause for suspicion.

The file and instructions are here:

http://www.memtest.org/

Here is a link that shows you have to create and use the memtest86+ CD:

http://www.geekstogo.com/forum/topic/246994-guide-to-using-memtest86/

If someone says to run memtest86, you can tell them to go pound sand and that you know memtest86+ supercedes memtest86 and here's why:  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memtest86

 


I need YOUR votes and points for helpful replies and Propose as Answers. I am saving up for a pony!

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.


 
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Views: 11,266 Last updated: May 29, 2018 Applies to: