Question

Q: svchost.exe 0x7c919af2 referenced memory at 0x00000010 Memory could not be "written"

This pops up every time I boot my computer:    svchost.exe   0x7c919af2 referenced memory at 0x00000010  Memory could not be "written". 

Then a total of 3 DOS windows pop open,  titled in reference to MSE, which close shortly thereafter. 

 

Original title:Error code: 0x7c919af2
And then my Firewall is NOT on.

 

This began several days ago, after spending a great deal of time and effort trying to chase down failed installs of updates for .NET framework. There's no telling what I've screwed up.

 

Using WIN XP Pro SP3.

Answer

A:

If you mean you are seeing messages like this:

svchost.exe at startup
Application Error : The instruction at "0x7c91b21a" referenced memory at "0x00000010". The memory could not be "written"
The instruction at "0x7c91b21a" referenced memory at 0x00000010"
application error 0x7c91b21a 0x00000010
The instruction at "0x7c928fea"referenced memory at "0x00000010". The memory could not be 'written'

Why is your firewall not on?

Here is a popular remedy for that situation:


It appears the latest update for Windows Media Player may be contributing to this problem when the system has the Windows Driver Foundation Service enabled and running.

Unless you are writing your own drivers for XP and using the Windows Driver Foundation Service to help you debug them, you should disable the WDF Service.

Click Start, Run and in the box enter:

services.msc

Click OK to launch the Services Applet

Locate the Windows Driver Foundation - User-mode Driver Framework Service, right click the Service, select Properties and choose Disabled and OK your way out of the Services Applet to save the changes.

Note that you will not be able to "Stop" the Service first, but that is okay.

Restart your system (the WDF service is now disabled) and check your failure condition now.

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

9 people were helped by this reply



 
Question Info

Views: 10,744 Last updated: May 11, 2018 Applies to: