How to Look At Compressed Old Files Before Deleting

During a Disk Cleanup Scan, the results showed I have 226,000 Compressed Old Files.  The delete box next to Compressed Old Files is not checked.  When I checked the box and clicked on View Files, it only showed me some downloaded programs.  Before I check the delete box and delete these Old Compressed Files, how do I determine if any of them I might want to keep?
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Are you talking about the line, compress old files?If your useing disk cleanup utility from system tools.All that means is the utility will compress the files you dont use or haven't used in awhile.In other words squeeze the files so they don't take up too much space.It doesn't delete them.

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Where can one find the compressed files?  After I did this with windows xp, the files just disappeared.

 

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I would like to know what "haven't used in awhile" is too.   What does that mean and how does XP decide what a while is.

If you get a million files on your system (or a few hundred thousand), you will soon be disabling that check for files the need to be compressed feature as you may misinterpret it's figuring out what might need to be compressed as your system being hung.

Microsofft even wrote a KB about it:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/812248/en-us

That adjustment will greatly reduce that amount of time it take your disk cleanup to run (I mean greatly).

If you think you have compressed files (they show up blue in Explorer), you can find them all using this command line tool:

http://exodusdev.com/products/find-compressed-files

Something like this will do it:

findcompressed.exe c:\ > compressed.txt

With the modern storage capacities today, compressing files is not usually even needed.

You may like a more modern tool like CCleaner better than those old fashioned built in Windows tools.  Read about is and see if it sounds good:

Download and install CCleaner from here:

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner

 



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Awhile means you haven't activated it for a period of time determined by a computer generated time frame.And I'd be careful useing CClean.

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That is too unspecific for me.

I know what it sounds like it means.

Maybe you can help me figure it out.

What is the definition of activated?  

My original XP has been installed for almost 7 years and I have zero compressed files (expect those I do manually for testing).  I still run the XP tools once in a while to learn how to fix them when they are not working.  Maybe my compression feature is broken.

How can I look at a file and tell that it has not been activated?  Does XP keep a list of files and the last time they were activated and where is the list?

How long must a file be in this state before it is determined to be inactive?

Exactly what is a period of time (in measurable units - a week, a month a year?) and what is a computer generated time frame?  It must be defined somewhere.

What if my idea of a while or a period of time is not the same as the computer generated time frame - how do I change it?

I don't know the answer either and don't use the feature but wondered about it once.

How/why should I be careful using CCleaner?  Will bad things happen?  I've heard rumors but they usually end up being self inflicted wounds, but I have never seen anything personally, but would like to

I have CCleaner installed right now - what bad things could I do to my system using it that would not be my own fault?  I don't care if I break my system.  Please provide a specific example - something better than "be careful".

I can add a warning to my notes if I know a specific danger and can reliably reproduce the threat, and we can let the Piriform people know there product may have a programming oversite.  

 


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To start with.Activated means you click on a program and it starts the program,hence activated.The predetermined time which I don't know exactly would probably be 60 days as the desktop icon cleanup tool runs every 60 days so I would think it is around that time frame.As for CCLEAN I have known others that ran it and it removed crucial files from the registry.Unless you scan everything it is removing you may lose something you need.You can use it all you want, fill your boots.I do not use it as I myself fix computers for other people and have no need. I do all my cleaning manually it is safer.As for an example I know 3 people that used it and ended up with BSOD and had to reload the O/S.There is no clear example as to what they did,they just ran it.As I said before I do not use that program and will not.

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Okay - So I click on a program and that counts as an activation.  Then if I don't activate it again, it will be compressed some time in the future?  

If I compress my files, use some programs and set my clock ahead 1 year into the future and then clean up again, will that compress all my programs?  That should do it, right?  I've tried it and it doesn't but it could be me.   I was just wondering how XP determines that a file needs to be compressed.  I know I can manually compress things and it will show up and be reported, but that is stuff I did by hand on purpose.  It doesn't matter really.

Does XP keep a list someplace and where is that list.  I don't think anybody seems to know and I don't deal with "probably" too much.

I have many types of non XP system files on my system that I know have not been accessed in at least 6 years and XP will not compress any of them - even though I sometimes give it a chance, now I just don't really care how it works too much!

I have heard the rumors of CCleaner, but have never been able to let it clean things and then have boot problem, so if there is some way to use it and have it break my system, I would like to know about it - I don't care if it breaks since I will just fix it.   I could use something to do that is intellectuality stimulating.

If you can give me just one example of any configuration where running CCleaner will make the system unbootable, I would like to see it since I never have actually seen it.  It gets blamed a lot, but that never seems to be the real problem when you figure out what really happened.  There is always something else.

What I usually see is it is always some other over zealous cleaning and CCleaner was part of the process (cockpit error or sef inflicted wounds)   CCleaner has a bad reputation sometimes.  I don't really use it either except to practice and try to break things on purpose - I too use my own methods.  But the interface is friendly and it has some features that make things easier.

Reinstalling the OS is not an option for so many folks that have to XP media, so I learn how to fix things without reinstalling XP and no XP media, then I can fix more things for more people.  I would rather get a poke in the eye with a sharp stick than even suggest reinstalling XP.  I have never reinstalled, repaired or restored XP to fix any problem, but I have practiced it to know how it all works.

You don't have to reinstall XP for a BSOD!  You can come to my how to troubleshoot and resolve Windows OS BSOD school someday.  I'll give you 50 scenarios where XP will not boot and you have to fix them all with no XP CDs, without reinstalling, repairing or using a restore point in order to graduate!


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The Disk Clean up gives an option or file viewer that you can click before you press the Okay button.

Unfortunately on "Compressed Old Files" it is an Options and not file view if you click options it will tell you how many days a program or file has before XP marks it as inactive and compresses it.
I think it is set to 50 days at default.

If I understand it correctly there is a way to manually go through your computer and see what files and programs are compressed

""You can display compressed files in color. Go to Folder Options /
View and check 'Show Encrypted or Compressed NTFS files
in color'.""

Once that's done I guess all you do is click through your computer's files and the ones in color is what will get deleted or whatever it does.

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During a Disk Cleanup Scan, the results showed I have 226,000 Compressed Old Files.  The delete box next to Compressed Old Files is not checked.  When I checked the box and clicked on View Files, it only showed me some downloaded programs.  Before I check the delete box and delete these Old Compressed Files, how do I determine if any of them I might want to keep?

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Last updated July 4, 2020 Views 28,118 Applies to: