What does I/O error status of 0xC000185 mean?

Hi, 
I am running Windows Vista with 3GB RAM.
It was working perfectly fine until I got the LCD display of my laptop screen replaced. 

Now, the system boots and all the startup programs also load successfully. 
But when I click anything (Start Icon, Windows Explorer etc), the system becomes extremely slow and unresponsive. 
After about 2 minutes of waiting it throws the following popup:-

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The instruction at 0x724D49E7 referenced memory at 0x6BA80D30. The required data was not placed 
into memory because of an I/O error status of 0xc0000185. 

Click OK to terminate the program
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I want to know if this I/O error is because of my newly replaced LCD screen and what does it mean in general. 

Perhaps if you can throw light into how it can be fixed, it would be great. 
Reformatting my system is not an option (but this is what my hardware vendor has suggested). 

Regards,
Amit
 

Question Info


Last updated November 19, 2018 Views 16,121 Applies to:
Answer

//
// MessageId: STATUS_IO_DEVICE_ERROR
//
// MessageText:
//
// The I/O device reported an I/O error.
//
#define STATUS_IO_DEVICE_ERROR           ((NTSTATUS)0xC0000185L)

 

To See if a Fix is Available

In Control Panel (and select Classic view in the left hand pane) choose Problem Reports and Solutions (type problem in Start's search box), go to Problem History, right click your error and choose Check For Solution. You may also right click and choose Details for more info. Post those details here.

 

To See if a Recent System Change Caused It

In Control Panel (and select Classic view in the left hand pane) choose Administrative Tools then choose Reliability and Performance Monitor and choose Monitoring Tools then Reliability Monitor (type Reliability in search on Start) . This list is a chart of software installs, uninstalls, Windows updates, and crashes by date (scroll left to see earlier dates). See if your crashes started happening after you installed or uninstalled something.

 
Standard Hardware Troubleshooting
 
 
First lets test what hardware we can. Hardware faults can appear as many software faults, therefore we need to test hardware first..
 

Please do the following in order. Memory faults can cause disk corruption, disk faults can cause disk corruption. Disk corruption causes corrupted files (which SFC may be able to fix). If you get an hardware error stop and post back. Do not run chkdsk with faulty memory.

 
Memory Diagnostic
If you haven't run a memory diagnostic then please do so. Click Start - Control Panel - choose Classic View in left hand pane - choose Administrative Tools -  then Memory Diagnostics Tool.
 
S.M.A.R.T
Start - All Programs - Accessories - Right click Command Prompt and choose Run As Administrator. Type (or copy and paste by right clicking in the Command Prompt window and choosing Paste).
 
Disk drives in Windows monitor themselves for impending failure. The feature is called S.M.A.R.T. It will detect impending failure 30% of the time. In an elevated command prompt type (it's one line)
 
wmic /namespace:\\root\wmi PATH MSStorageDriver_FailurePredictStatus get active,predictfailure,reason /format:List
 
If it's on Active will be true, if not on turn it on in the computer's BIOS.
 
Predict Failure should be False if everything's ok.
 
In Vista and later if SMART predicts failure Windows prompts the user to run Backup.
 
Run Chkdsk
In Computer right click all your drives and choose Properties, then Tools tab, then click Check Now. Tick BOTH checkboxes then Start. Reboot. This will take overnight.
 
SFC
Check for file corruption by clicking Start - All Programs - Accessories - Right click Command Prompt and choose Run As Administrator. Type (or copy and paste by right clicking in the Command Prompt window and choosing Paste).
 
sfc /scannow
 
Heat
Heat can cause problems like this and also sudden reboots without crashing. Ensure your fans are not clogged with dust.
 
For Memory Diagnostic Results
Click Start - Control Panel (and select Classic view in the left hand pane) choose Administrative Tools then Event Viewer then look at Event Viewer (Local) - Applications and Services - Microsoft - Windows - MemoryDiagnostic-Results for entries.
 
Look for EventID is 1201 or 1101 and Source is MemoryDiagnostic-Results
 
Double click the entry for details on that entry.

For Chkdsk Results
Click Start - Control Panel (and select Classic view in the left hand pane) choose Administrative Tools then Event Viewer then look at both the Application and System logs (under Windows Logs) for entries.
 
Look for EventID is 7 and Source is Disk
Look for EventID is 11 and Source is Disk
Look for EventID is 50 and Source is Disk
Look for EventID is 51 and Source is Disk
Look for EventID is 52 and Source is Disk
Look for EventID is 55 and Source is NTFS
Look for EventID is 130 and Source is NTFS
Look for EventID is 134 and Source is NTFS
Look for EventID is 137 and Source is NTFS
Look for EventID is 1001 and Source is Autochk
Look for EventID is 1001 and Source is Winlogon
Look for EventID is 1001 and Source is WinInit
Look for EventID is 1001 and Source is Chkdsk
Look for EventID is 26212 and Source is Chkdsk
Look for EventID is 26213 and Source is Chkdsk
Look for EventID is 26214 and Source is Chkdsk
Double click the entry for details on that entry.
 
P.S. 7 and 55 are the auto repair codes where windows repairs disk errors silently on the fly. 52 is the SMART warning.
 
If the results don't get transferred to the event logs from a boot time chkdsk then the results are probably in the following file c:\Bootex.log. This file gets deleted when the results are moved into the event logs.
 
For SFC Results
Start - All Programs - Accessories - Right click Command Prompt and choose Run As Administrator. Type (or copy and paste by right clicking in the Command Prompt window and choosing Paste).
 
findstr /c:"[SR] Cannot" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log|more
 
This will see which files are corrupted.
 
To see if it did anything
 
findstr /c:"[SR] Repairing" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log|more
 
There are frequent false positives for small text files Windows uses such as desktop.ini and settings.ini. Ignore these.
 

 

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