Question
223581 views

Windows 7 update install time taking a very long time

ChaosDragon92 asked on

Well I have a Windows 7 OS, and I shut down my laptop yesterday but then it automatically went in sleep mode as I slept. As I awoken it in the morning I see its at installing updates 32 of 45. Though I see the same thing in the night with no change.  I also see my hard-drive light flashing like it normally does when it's doing something but is this normal and if not what can I do? Also this computer is only 3 days old, and I have not made a recovery media due to lack of media I can use to use for the back up.

299 people had this question

Abuse history


The answered status icon Answer
Meghmala replied on

Hi ChaosDragon92,


You may restart your computer, then use the below steps and check if this helps resolve the issues-


Method 1:

You may use the windows update troubleshooter and check if it lists and resolves any issues -

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Open-the-Windows-Update-troubleshooter

 

Method 2:
Also I would suggest you to check in the update history if you are getting any error codes for the failed updates. If you get any errors, do provide us the same to assist you better. To c
heck the recent updates installed on your computer.
View updates history -

a. Click Start, Settings and then control panel (all items view). Click on the Windows Update icon.
b.
Click on view update history link.
c.
To view the details of a single update select and right click on a listed windows update, then click on view details. Click Close when done.

You may also refer to the below link for additional assistance and check if these assist you-
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Troubleshoot-problems-with-installing-updates

Method 3:
Use the system update readiness tool –

Download the System Readiness Tool.The System Update Readiness Tool checks your computer and tries to resolve certain conditions that could interfere with the installation of updates or other software.Here is a link to download System Readiness Tool; you may do it according to the exact configuration of the computer:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947821


After you download and then run the System Update Readiness Tool, restart your computer. Then check if you are able to install the updates properly.

Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Meghmala – Microsoft Support

Visit our Microsoft Answers Feedback Forum and let us know what you think

Be the first person to mark this helpful

Abuse history


Most Helpful Reply
SparkMad replied on

I think the issue is that even with a brand new Windows install the updates can take forever. Literally hang at 0% download for 5 hours. And then people decide to just let it run overnight and in the morning the computer is either asleep with 0 progress or still sitting with no progress. (and there is nothing wrong with their computer or OS install at all). I'm an IT guy at a gigantic computer company so I know this is not uncommon.

I recently rebuilt my sister's Win 7 computer from scratch to install Win 10 and it's been 3 days and all the updates haven't finished. Repeat - I'm an IT guy that runs the patch program at work. Trying to patch a clean computer that works perfectly. We don't have WSUS at home - but even with a WSUS many machines have inexplicable issues with getting patched up. Even machines that work perfectly for patching will randomly not be able to install patches a year later. I've seen this many dozens (hundreds?) of times. I tried a clean install of Win 10  on my sister's computer and 2 hrs later it just has a cryptic error code - which apparently from a google search is quite common. I tried multiple clean Win 7 to Win 10 upgrades but it keeps failing. Not all the Win 7 patches are installed (2 days later) but it offered a few times to switch to Win 10 - but it always fails. I'd assume it would know - or patch - anything it needs before attempting the upgrade. But the update process is slow and painful. Too painful to expect the general public to put up with. It's like if your new car wouldn't start without spending 3 days updating it - that would be unacceptable - but it's somehow okay with MS. (As a side note, I have a Ford Edge with MS software and I feel the frustration with MS software and cars. Just too buggy and inexplicably slow at times - yet Ford and MS think it's okay for you to wait while the car "reboots" or has long delays when you push a button)

Anyway - I just wanted to add my 2 cents since many non-IT folks may assume their long and frustrating update procedure is rare or there is something wrong with their computer. There isn't. It's MS's issue and it likely isn't going to go away. Frustrating issues with much of their software (OS, Office, vehicle) carries on to new versions for some reason. I  know they can't fix every bug - but the big common game changers leading to lots of frustration are all too often too difficult to deal with. A clean Win machine should grab and install updates in no time - but a good 10% of machines or more are a long slow struggle. Perhaps they should release service packs more often so you can get around these 100+ updates that lead to so much wasted time? I mean seriously MS - can't you just make a service pack for Win 7 and Win 8 that you need to apply just before upgrading to Win 10? At least that way it's 1 download and people don't have to wait for the buggy Windows Update procedure to look for updates.

Another solution is to make everyone at MS update their own computers like the general public. No IT, no imaging, MOM or WSUS or whatever patch mechanism. If the people at MS had to each deal with the issues - I mean the executives, the accountants, the marketing people, then they'd know right away what the support people do. There are far too many issues that don't get fixed and the update procedure is slow and painful. A 1% failure rate is not acceptable since that means millions of PCs have issues.

433 people found this helpful

Abuse history


progress