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Q: Move c:\windows\installer This thread is locked from future replies

Windows 8

With a 64Gb SSD C Drive and space left at 5.5Gb I want to move the folders and files of C:\Windows\Installer > D:\C_DRIVE\Windows\Installer.

There is a how to guide for Windows 7 at

http://www.kavoir.com/2012/07/how-to-free-up-c-drive-disk-space-in-windows-7-easy.html

It uses the mklink or symbolic link method to point to D drive:

mklink /D C:\Windows\Installer D:\C_DRIVE\Windows\Installer

Once the folders are copied over to D the files the folders on C can be deleted. To obtain the higher SYSTEM privileges, above Administrator, it first used, in W7, a bat file:

sc Create SysCMD binPath="cmd /K start" type=own type=interact
sc start SysCMD

and file removal by:

rmdir /s /q C:\Windows\Installer

 This bat file just flashes in W8.

How can I change the bat file to get the correct rights to remove the c:\windows\installer folders?



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Hi Robert,

 

It is never suggested to move the operating system core components and files to a drive other than the operating system drive. Because they will cause instabilities in the operating system files.

 

If you do not have enough space on c: drive, you may try the below suggestions:

a. Move the download folder to another drive.

b. Empty recycle bin

c. Uninstall the applications that you no more use.

d. Perform disk cleanup.

 

If you still want to move the installer folder, you may right click on the bat file and select Run as administrator.

 

If that fails, you may open the command prompt as administrator, copy the command from the batch file and paste it in the command prompt. Here you can see the status of the command too.

 

Note: Run this commands on your risk, Microsoft cannot guarantee any problems resulting from this can be solved.

 

Hope the information provided is useful.

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Hi Babu,

Thank you.
I have done all the easy moves.
The problem with the installer folder is that it is hardly ever used and keeps on growing. It is already over 6Gb since January so might take up all the remaining C drive space sometime next year.

I only have 5.5Gb left so am unsure if Windows 8.1 can be installed.

What about compressing the installer folder. What is the best way to do that?

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Your basic/fundamental problem is that your ssd is far too small for either win7 or win8, you will run into a multitude of problems if you try to move the Users folder, or any of the other system folders (from the information/recommendations found in any Google search)

You can of course redirect the Libraries

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Your basic/fundamental problem is that your ssd is far too small for either win7 or win8, you will run into a multitude of problems if you try to move the Users folder, or any of the other system folders (from the information/recommendations found in any Google search)

You can of course redirect the Libraries


I had not used W8 before I bought the new Medion PC and presumed that the manufacturer believed 64Gb to be sufficient to run Windows.
Once bought I soon found that search took 1Gb, Hibernate 6Gb and install another 6Gb
 I cannot install a larger SSD without breaking the warranty and the use of UEFI Bios and no instructions from Medion as to settings makes that a matter of chance in any case. None of my proprietary back up software can even run a boot CD for image re-installs due to Microsoft unsigned UEFI.

Why is W8 ever allowed to be installed on a boot drive that will become too small in any case?

I don't use the libraries.

With software being written presuming users have massive mechanical hard drives this issue is going to blow up for many non-technical SSD users.

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How to get system user in windows 8

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2008/10/22/getting-a-cmd-prompt-as-system-in-windows-vista-and-windows-server-2008.aspx

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Take a look at this SO post.  The answer by bajov should be exactly what you need.  I have tried it and it works.
Hong

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I'm curious why you used mklink /d instead of mklink /j. The web tells me the former creates a symbolic link to a directory while the latter creates a directory junction. The web is less helpful in explaining when and why I might use one rather than the other. Would mklink /j accomplish the same thing you did with mklink /d? I.e. would both methods allow me to place the C:\Windows\Installer folder on a different drive while Windows 7 "thinks" it's still on the C drive? Would I notice any difference in the end result? If so, what? If not, what would be different "under the hood"?

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The fundamental problem is that Windows wastes way too much space. It's full of bloat and trash (and lately spyware - telemetry services).

I have a Windows 8 To Go on a 32 GB USB, it's useful in a pinch. 64 GB should be more than enough for an OS! (And apart from games and a few special software like Xilinx, it should also be enough for most of your apps.)

Even when you install Win 7 it's bigger than i would like it to be (Windows XP used less space and the new features I need from Win7 - like TRIM support - does not warrant the increase in size). But in time it will consume everything... ok, maybe not everything but a lot of space. And until I can afford a 1 TB+ SSD I need that fast storage space for other stuff and not dead code.

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The link you provided successfully launched CMD as a system user in Windows 10.

Establishing a system directory link to an additional drive using the CMD as administrator gave the message the link was created; however it did not work, Creating the same link as a system user did work. 

About six months ago I had purchased an inexpensive Windows Tablet having only 32 GB of disc space for Windows 10. With nothing else on the tablet, this was not enough space to upgrade to Windows 10th Anniversary Edition (Version 1607). Moving the Windows Installer Folder to an installed SD card solved that problem, and has probably extended the life of my tablet, from three months to probably more than three years. Thank you!!!  

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> The fundamental problem is that Windows wastes way too much space.

Exactly, SzikraIstvan.

One comes here when all other recommendations (such as uninstalling programs and emptying Recycle Bin) are exhausted. I don't care that some things may get broken in Windows (more often than not they don't, BTW). I basically have no choice other than throwing away my SSD drive.

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Views: 33917 Last updated: January 15, 2018 Applies to: