Upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit - Hardware Optimization

I just bought an off-lease business machine and for the most part it is more computer than I generally need but I am having a few issues (one of them definately Windows-related) and am close to biting the bullet and wiping out my C drive and starting over.  I don't have the o/s disks for this machine and, rather than installing a generic verison of XP Pro I'm thinking this might be a good time to install Windows 7.  I did install the Windows 7 upgrade advisor tool thing and I know I "can" run Windows 7 using my current architecture, but alot of the time there is the minimum requirements to run a program and then there are little things you can do (typically increasing RAM) to take advantage of certain features or otherwise make the program run better.  I have a P4, running at 3.4Ghz, 3GB of DDR2 RAM, 160GB HDD (and another 250GB outboard).  The only thing I am seriously considering is swapping out the two 512MB sticks for two 1GB sticks, but with XP Pro (32 bit) I know there would be no advantage to this, as Windows would only see 3GB anyway.  What about with Windows 7, 64 bit - would this be an advantage?  (4GB as opposed to 3).  TIA.

Mark
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Answer
It looks like your machine will run Win7 64 but you'll want to make sure all the hardware has Win7 64-bit drivers since you can't use 32-bit drivers in a 64-bit system. You also need to make sure your processor is 64-bit capable. Check on Intel's site for that. And yes, the 64-bit version will be able to see and use all 4GB of RAM. The 3GB is fine though depending on what you do with your computer.

Windows 7: Which One Is Right For You? - http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/compare-editions
Windows 7 Application Compatibility - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/aa905066.aspx
Paul Thurrott's very complete comparison chart for Windows 7 (includes inbound connections limitation)
http://www.winsupersite.com/win7/win7_skus_compare.asp
Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor - http://www.microsoft.com/Windows/windows-7/get/upgrade-advisor.aspx
MS-MVP - Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!

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The dude who I'm thinking of buying Win 7 from tells me that the newest versions come with a single DVD which is both the 32 and 64 bit versions, and it auto determines which it should install 
Be very, very careful if you buy from that person, and make sure you are not buying a pirated copy. Check this site to check what to look for:
http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/Product.aspx?pid=cf3e261d-ae9b-4a03-94db-ce71e4153859&cID=ea710cad-37b0-4975-bcd6-abfee19961df&method=retail&displaylang=en


is there a reason why I might wanna start with a copy of XP Pro on my system when I put the Win 7 (full, not upgrade) disk in?
If you buy an Upgrade the software requires XP/Vista to be installed. After you use KillDisk reinstall XP, then chose the Custom install option.




Custom Clean Install Steps

Times to use:
Moving from XP to Windows 7, or other unsupported in place upgrade paths (ex: Vista Home to 7 Pro)
Moving from a 32 bit Windows system to a 64 bit system, or changing languages
Don't want to do an in place upgrade, or you want a fresh/clean install

You can use an Upgrade or Full Windows 7 disk to do a custom clean install. This will remove all your programs, but you can save your files and settings to an external storage before doing so. You will have to reinstall all your programs after installing Windows 7. Here are the steps:

1. Run Windows Upgrade Advisor to see if there are any known issues that might affect the installation and whether you can install the 32 or 64 bit version of Windows 7.
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/upgrade-advisor

2. Back up your files and settings. To avoid losing anything you'll need to save copies of all the files, photos, and other information you want to keep on to an external storage device. Windows Easy Transfer is a free tool you can use to copy your files (but not programs) from your PC, and then transfer them back after you install Windows 7. If you don't want to use Windows Easy Transfer, you can copy the files you want to keep on a USB flash drive, or on CD/DVD.
http://windows.microsoft.com/windows-easy-transfer

3. Locate the original installation disks and any associated product/license keys for the programs currently on your computer because you'll need to manually reinstall all your programs after you install Windows 7. Depending on what you have installed you might be able to download some programs from the Internet.

4. Inset the Windows 7 DVD into your PC. When asked "Which type of installation do you want? click "Custom (advanced)." Note: 32 to 64 bit requires you to restart and boot from the DVD.
  
5. After Windows 7 is installed you can use Windows Easy Transfer (or another backup method you used) to restore your files & settings, and use your installation disks to reinstall all your programs. Then you're done - enjoy Windows 7.




Have Questions About Installing Windows 7?
FAQ - Common Windows 7 Installation Questions & Answers
MCC 2011

TrekDozer

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Last updated March 20, 2018 Views 632 Applies to: