Question

Q: Unspecified changes to system configuration might have caused the problem. This thread is locked from future replies

Okay. So I got a brand new PC which I assembled. But I did not have the cable to connect the DVD to the HDD. As a result, my DVD player was useless. And, so I could not boot up my computer with Windows 7 or install any drivers that came along with it.

For which reason, I came up with the bright idea (now I'm really questioning that) of replacing my new Hard Drive with the older comp's Hard Drive just so I could install Windows 7 on it. Which I successfully did! Happy, that I would now be able to do without a DVD player, I proceeded to put the original older Hard Drive (With Vista on it) on the older comp. And, put the newer HDD in the new PC. But now, Windows 7 won't boot and I get the error message, after several seconds of trying to diagnose the problem. (This, here is the root cause : Unspecified changes to system configuration might have caused the problem.)

I read up on another thread that (quote : http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/250347-32-transferring-hard-drive-computer) that Windows running on a newer machine will detect the new hardware and assume I have made an illegal second installation of this licensed software. And, so.. I'm guessing, refuse to boot?

To fix this I'm supposed to contact support. Which I did. But they could not help me and I was directed here instead. While in that thread, the guy is trying to use the HDD from his older PC, I'm just trying to make-do without a DVD. And attempting to run Win 7 which I installed using my older comp's DVD on my new computer. Is there any fix to this? Please help!

Answer

A:

Windows 7 is not meant to be transferred in that way, you could try doing a repair install and see if it fixes the problem, otherwise, you should consider doing a custom install:

Method 1:

===============

1. Put the Windows 7 installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer.

2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

3. Select a language, a time, a currency, and a keyboard or another input method, and then click Next.

4. Click Repair your computer.

5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt.

7. Type sfc /scannow, and then press ENTER.

 

Method 2:

===============

1. Put the Windows Windows 7 installation disc in the disc drive, and then start the computer.

2. Press any key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

3. Select a language, time, currency, and a keyboard or another input method. Then click Next.

4. Click Repair your computer.

5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt.

7. Type Bootrec /RebuildBcd, and then press ENTER.

 

Method 3:

===============

1. Put the Windows Windows 7 installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer.

2. Press a key when the message indicating "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …". appears.

3. Select a language, a time, a currency, and a keyboard or another input method, and then click Next.

4. Click Repair your computer.

5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt.

7. Type BOOTREC /FIXMBR, and then press ENTER.

8. Type BOOTREC /FIXBOOT, and then press ENTER.

9. Type Drive:\boot\Bootsect.exe /NT60 All, and then press ENTER.

 

Note: In this command, Drive is the drive where the Windows 7 installation media is located.

Best,
Andre
Windows Insider MVP
MVP-Windows and Devices for IT
twitter/adacosta
groovypost.com

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Views: 16263 Last updated: January 10, 2018 Applies to: