replacing a slow c drive with a SSD drive

I am considering puchasing a SSD and would like to replace my existing C drive with this SSD.  I want to move my current install of Windows 7 to the new drive.  I have an upgrade licence for Windows 7 and performed a clean install as I upgraded from Vista 32 to Windows 7 64-bit.

Is there a relatively easy way to do this?  I would like to end up with the SSD as my C drive and my old drive as a different drive letter.  If need be I don't mind re-installing Windows 7 but I wouldn't want to have to intall Vista 32 first.

 

Thanks for any info.

 

Question Info


Last updated June 12, 2018 Views 3,041 Applies to:
Answer

 If need be I don't mind re-installing Windows 7 but I wouldn't want to have to intall Vista 32 first.

To do what you want you can make an image of the hard drive and restore it to the SSD, but the SSD must be larger then the partition Windows 7 is installed on.


You can use a free hard drive imaging program:
 
Reflect Disk Imaging:
http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.asp
 
Paragon Backup & Recovery Free Edition:
http://www.paragon-software.com/home/db-express/download.html
 


Have Questions About Installing Windows 7?
FAQ - Common Windows 7 Installation Questions & Answers
MCC 2011

TrekDozer

Sharing bits of knowledge.

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Answer
My partition may be bigger but I have used less than 30Gigs (may purchase a 120GIG SSD).
If the Windows 7 partition is bigger then the SSD (120GB) you can shrink the Windows 7 partition.


Shrink Windows 7 Partition
Be careful, re-sizing partitions is risky, always a small chance something could go wrong - backup anything important.  
1. Click Start, right click on Computer
2. Click Manage
3. Click Disk Management (on the left)
4. Here you can shrink the C: partition - right click it and select "Shrink Volume"
5. Chose a new size for the C: partition that is less then 120GB


GParted Boot Resizing  a Partition in Windows 7
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/
 
If Windows won't allow the changes you can use a Gparted boot disk to change the partitions. If you will be changing the main Windows partition backup anything important - it's rare but things can go wrong. Altering the partitions can be risky, be careful and know what you are doing - there is no Windows safety option when using this - if you tell it to format the Windows partition it will do so and delete the entire Windows installation. If after altering the partitions Windows 7 data/files are still there but Windows won't boot the following may help:

Try Repairing The Windows 7 Installation
1. Insert the Windows 7 DVD and restart your computer
2. Boot from the DVD.
3. Choose your language and click Next.
4. Click Repair Your Computer and then select the operating system you want to repair.
5. Click on the Startup Repair link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
If that doesn't fix it:
 
1. Insert the Windows 7 DVD and restart your computer
2. Boot from the DVD. If prompted, press any key to start Windows from the installation disc.
3. Choose your language and click Next.
4. Click Repair Your Computer and then select the operating system you want to repair.
5. Select Command Prompt and try the following commands (a single command might work, or you may need to use multiple commands depending on the exact problem):
 
bootrec /fixMBR
bootrec /fixBoot
bootrec /rebuildBCD
 
Note: there is a space before the /
 

 
if the total partition size is less than 120GIGs.  If it is, would I then end up with a partitioned SSD? For instance, if my current partition is 100GIG and I have used 30GIGs, would I end up with a SSD with a 100GIG partition and a 20GIG partition?
Both programs linked above allow you to increase the partition size when restoring the image, so in your example you would have one 120GB partition. (I think both do, I know at least one of them allows it.) You can not decrease the size of a partition when restoring it.


Important:
You need a separate (3rd) partition to store the image. Use an external drive, or if your current HD has room save the image on the other partition, then restore it to the SSD. It should have room after you shrink the Windows 7 partition and create a new partition from the empty space.



Have Questions About Installing Windows 7?
FAQ - Common Windows 7 Installation Questions & Answers
MCC 2011

TrekDozer

Sharing bits of knowledge.

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.