"Windows Media Player is not installed properly and must be reinstalled."

I am running Windows 7, Home Premium x64. A while back my Windows Media Player went sideways on me and quit working. I began getting a message box which read, "Windows Media Player is not installed properly and must be reinstalled. Do you want to install the Player from the Microsoft Web site?"

Clicking the "Yes" button takes me to an MS website which gives the useless message which apologizes profusely for its singular lack of helpfulness and gleefully suggests I check for an update.

I have tried using the System Restore, to no avail. I have turned all Windows media off, rebooted, turned it back on, rebooted - nothing. The install disk I have for Win7 (the upgrade disk) does not give me the opportunity to repair anything.

Poking around in various logs with the Event Viewer doesn't show me anything.

So now I'm screwed.

So how does one repair the WMP 12 installation?

 

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Last updated August 20, 2019 Views 12,447 Applies to:
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I am also running Windows 7, Home Premium x64 and had the same problem. For 4-months I tried every solution in this forum and all those I found on the internet with no luck. I can't tell you the number of times I have turned Media Features off and back on again...NOTHING WORKED!  Then one day, I started messing around with the WMP files and folders and stumbled onto something to get WMP working again.  I can't guarantee this will work for anyone else, but it worked for me.  Here's what I did:

Since I assumed the problem with WMP was due to an improperly installed 64-bit version, I decided to see if the 32-bit version of WMP would run if I copied the wmplayer.exe file from the 64-bit folder ("c:\Program Files\Windows Media Player") to the 32-bit folder ("c:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Media Player"), effectively overwriting the "32-bit version" of wmplayer.exe.  To do this, I had to first take ownership of the "c:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Media Player" folder before Windows would allow me to overwrite the file. Once I did these two things, I double-clicked on a mp3 file and MUCH to my surprise, WMP worked!  I was actually expecting to receive a Windows error about trying to run the wrong WMP version or something more nebulous.  Although I was happy to have WMP working again, I was baffled as to why this worked when it was the 32-bit folder & file I made changes to and not the 64-bit folder.  Was the source of the problem the 32-bit folder and not the 64-bit folder I wondered?  Did that mean that all along Windows was trying to run the 32-bit version of WMP and not the 64-bit version as I expected?  To answer this, I decided to to repeat what I'd done, but first I determined that I needed to turn off the Media Features, then turn them back on to start all over.

I turned WMP off via Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Windows Features on or off and restarted.  After verifying that the WMP 32-bit folder was gone, I manually deleted the 64-bit folder ("c:\Program Files\Windows Media Player") and restarted just for good measure.  Next, I turned WMP back on via the Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Windows Features on or off and restarted.  At this point, my intent was to repeat the steps of taking ownership of the 32-bit folder, and overwriting the wmplayer.exe just as I'd done before; however, I decided I would check to see if WMP would work first by double-clicking on a mp3 file.  Much to my surprise (again) WMP worked!  In fact, WMP now runs without problems when I double-clicked the wmplayer.exe file either the 32-bit or 64-bit folders!

I can't explain for the life of me why this worked, especially since the folder/file I originally made the changes to were both the 32-bit version of WMP.  Even more baffling, I can't understand why I didn't have to repeat the steps of taking ownership of the 32-bit folder, and overwriting the wmplayer.exe as I'd originally done; yet, WMP still worked--and from both the 32-bit and 64-bit no less!  I can't tell if Windows is now running a 32- or 64-bit version of WMP when I double-click a mp3 file since neither Default Programs or file properties reveal the path to a specific wmplayer.exe version.  I'm sure this is not the optimal solution for this problem; it may even be just a fluke.  I welcome your feedback and answers to the things I can't explain :)

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