Windows created a temporary paging file on your computer

Hi all I recently upgraded my Laptop from Windows Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 professional. (64 bit)

I also upgraded a desktop from Windows XP to Windows 7 pro. (64 bit)

As usual as I have done in the past with previous versions of windows. I set up a separate logical partition (same physical drive) and defined  a paging file size for the partition.  generally 1.5 - 2.0 times the size of the physical ram. (for both of these machines each has 4Gb of ram)

 

So when I did this for these two machines I now get this warning message and Windows creates a temporary pagefile.sys on the C drive where I don't want it.

 

In both cases I'm not using these partitions for anything else, both are GT 8 Gb in size, the laptop has a 12Gb partition and the desktop a 16 Gb partition.

 

Here's the kicker. The allocated size Windows creates on the C drives is ONLY 4Gb!  2Gb smaller than the recommended size.

 

When I adjust the min and max sizes to 6144 and 7168 megabytes and reboot.  Windows 7 essentially ignores my settings and creates the temp paging file on the C drive and issues this warning msg.

To Wit:

 "Windows created a temporary paging file on your computer because of a problem that occurred with your paging file configuration when you started your computer. Total paging file size for all disk drives may be somewhat larger than the size  you specified." 

 

Also on both  of these machines I'm only using between 25 and 35 % of the system RAM.

at any given time. I don't keep a lot of "windows" open. I don't do any gaming or run any databases.

 

So I'm NOT low on memory.

 

Any Ideas on how I can force windows 7 from creating these temporary paging files and only use the ones I have defined.

Thanks 2UWrangler

 

 

 

Question Info


Last updated July 2, 2019 Views 8,647 Applies to:
2UW

You can turn off page file on the C drive  These are generic instructions done from memory (Im on win 8 atm) in system control panel>advanced system settings>advanced>performance>advanced>virtual memory>Uncheck auto manage>check no page file

There is a good reason to have a small page file the size of your RAM on the OS drive & that is if you eve BSOD and dont have one no DMP file will be written making recovery more difficult


Cat herder
Windows Insider MVP
MVP-Windows and Devices for IT
http://www.zigzag3143.com/

2 people were helped by this reply

·

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Hi all I recently upgraded my Laptop from Windows Vista Home Premium to Windows 7 professional. (64 bit)

I also upgraded a desktop from Windows XP to Windows 7 pro. (64 bit)

As usual as I have done in the past with previous versions of windows. I set up a separate logical partition (same physical drive) and defined  a paging file size for the partition.  generally 1.5 - 2.0 times the size of the physical ram. (for both of these machines each has 4Gb of ram)

 

So when I did this for these two machines I now get this warning message and Windows creates a temporary pagefile.sys on the C drive where I don't want it.

 

In both cases I'm not using these partitions for anything else, both are GT 8 Gb in size, the laptop has a 12Gb partition and the desktop a 16 Gb partition.

 

Here's the kicker. The allocated size Windows creates on the C drives is ONLY 4Gb!  2Gb smaller than the recommended size.

 

When I adjust the min and max sizes to 6144 and 7168 megabytes and reboot.  Windows 7 essentially ignores my settings and creates the temp paging file on the C drive and issues this warning msg.

To Wit:

 "Windows created a temporary paging file on your computer because of a problem that occurred with your paging file configuration when you started your computer. Total paging file size for all disk drives may be somewhat larger than the size  you specified." 

 

Also on both  of these machines I'm only using between 25 and 35 % of the system RAM.

at any given time. I don't keep a lot of "windows" open. I don't do any gaming or run any databases.

 

So I'm NOT low on memory.

 

Any Ideas on how I can force windows 7 from creating these temporary paging files and only use the ones I have defined.

Thanks 2UWrangler

 

 


Hi ZigZag3143  thanks very much for your response.

I didn't make clear that I had initially turned off paging on the "C" drive (as I have done in previous versions of windows)

That's my "problem" despite removing the page file from the "C" drive and defining a page file on

another logical partition, when I reboot the system I'm still getting this warning message.

I wonder if it's controlled thru some setting(s) in the registry.

 

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

There should always be a small page file on C, maybe 500mb so that Windows can use it to deposit dmp files in the event of a crash.


However, there is NOTHING to be gained by moving the rest of the page file to a partition which is on the same drive as C. All you are doing is forcing the heads to move even more every time that the page file is accessed.


Moving the page file to another drive only makes sense and only works when it is moved to another physical drive.


Set your page file on C to 'system managed' and the messages will go away, assuming that your C drive is large enough to accommodate everything that you do..



Windows 10 Pro - Start10 - part of a local network which is a '3rd party optimizer-free' zone..

2 people were helped by this reply

·

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

There should always be a small page file on C, maybe 500mb so that Windows can use it to deposit dmp files in the event of a crash.


However, there is NOTHING to be gained by moving the rest of the page file to a partition which is on the same drive as C. All you are doing is forcing the heads to move even more every time that the page file is accessed.


Moving the page file to another drive only makes sense and only works when it is moved to another physical drive.


Set your page file on C to 'system managed' and the messages will go away, assuming that your C drive is large enough to accommodate everything that you do..




Hi Mike I appreciate your response..so what you're telling me is that this "behavior" is a "Feature" not a problem.  I find this curious since I've defined separate paging files in previous versions of windows sometimes (in the past 4 years) in another partition on the same drive, and on a separate drive

when hard-drives weren't as large as they are now. I build my own systems and I've always used

Western Digital drives with great success so I'm not worried about forcing the heads to do a job they're

designed to do.

Regarding the writing of dump data to the paging file I find that curious also.

To my way of thinking (IBM z/OS) it's better to write dump data to a special dump file which could be a USB "thumb" drive.

Writing out of dumps takes memory also and probably forces the use of the paging file.

I wonder if there's a way to create a separate dump file.

Frankly I don't see why it makes a difference if the paging file is on a separate physical drive or a separate partition on the same drive. To me placing the paging file in a separate partition is safer

than placing the file on the "C" system drive where the chance of overwriting another file is a distinct

possibility.

So the bottom line with Windows 7 is that I have to create a paging file on a separate physical drive.

Why can't it be like Linux where you can define a swap partition on the same physical drive as the root

OR it can be on a separate drive. doesn't matter.   sigh !!!  Perhaps I can ask that this capability could be in the next release.

Thanks again

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Please provide a copy of your System Information file. Type System Information in the Search Box above the start Button and press the ENTER key. Select File, Export and give the file a name noting where it is located. The system creates a new System Information file each time system information is accessed. You need to allow a minute or two for the file to be fully populated before exporting a copy. Please upload to your Sky Drive, share with everyone and post a link here. Please say if the report has been obtained in safe mode.

 

Please upload and share with everyone copies of your System and Application logs from your Event Viewer to your Sky Drive and post a link here.

 

To access the System log select Start, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Event Viewer, from the list in the left side of the window select Windows Logs and System. Place the cursor on System, select Action from the Menu and Save All Events as (the default evtx file type) and give the file a name. Do the same for the Applications log. Do not provide filtered files.

 

For help with Sky Drive see paragraph 9.3:
http://www.gerryscomputertips.co.uk/MicrosoftCommunity1.htm

Gerry
Stourport-on-Severn, Worcestershire, England
Enquire Plan Execute

9 people were helped by this reply

·

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.