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Windows 7 irql_not_less_or_equal minutes after login

VHZ1 asked on

Hello, I am new to this forum.

My PC is having a irql_not_less_or_equal BSOD a few minutes after login in Windows 7. The only programs running are Quickbooks POS, Excel, Notepad and HWMonitor. After two or three reboots the computer runs normally.
I have tested and switched ram, no errors (Memtest 7 passes)
Tested the hard drive, no errors
Cleaned the dust
Checked the PSU
Unistalled and clean installed several nvidia drivers in safe mode

No BSOD on safe mode

Because of the error code and no BSOD on safe mode:
It should be a driver issue.

Could someone please tell me what I need to update, unistall or install?

My system specs are:
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate x64
CPU: AMD Athlon II X3 425
Motherboard: ASUS M4N68T-M
RAM: Kingston HyperX Blu 2GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333
Graphics Card: Galaxy 64TGF8HX6FTZ GeForce GT 640
Hard Drive: Samsung 500 GB SATA II Hard Drive HD502HJ
PSU: LEPA N Series N500-SA 500W ATX12V Power Supply

Thank you in advance

Minidumps in the following link: http://www.mediafire.com/download/hjh38i7jxvb6dbv/033014-17752-01.zip

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Patrick Barker replied on

Hi,

Both of the attached DMP files are of the IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL (a) bug check.

This indicates that Microsoft Windows or a kernel-mode driver accessed paged memory at DISPATCH_LEVEL or above.

This bug check is issued if paged memory (or invalid memory) is accessed when the IRQL is too high. The error that generates this bug check usually occurs after the installation of a faulty device driver, system service, or BIOS.

--------------------

1.

1: kd> lmvm asacpi
start             end                 module name
fffff880`03f56000 fffff880`03f5e000   ASACPI     (deferred)             
    Image path: \SystemRoot\system32\DRIVERS\ASACPI.sys
    Image name: ASACPI.sys
    Timestamp:        Sun Mar 27 22:30:36 2005

^^ Asus ATK0110 ACPI Utility (a known BSOD maker in Win7 and Win8). Also a part of many Asus utilities. The pre-2009 driver is very known to cause BSOD's, so please update ASAP - http://support.asus.com/download/download.aspx

2. If you're still crashing after the above, please enable Driver Verifier:

Driver Verifier:

What is Driver Verifier?

Driver Verifier is included in Windows 8/8.1, 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 to promote stability and reliability; you can use this tool to troubleshoot driver issues. Windows kernel-mode components can cause system corruption or system failures as a result of an improperly written driver, such as an earlier version of a Windows Driver Model (WDM) driver.

Essentially, if there's a 3rd party driver believed to be at issue, enabling Driver Verifier will help flush out the rogue driver if it detects a violation.

Before enabling Driver Verifier, it is recommended to create a System Restore Point:

Vista - START | type rstrui - create a restore point
Windows 7 - START | type create | select "Create a Restore Point"
Windows 8 - http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4690-restore-point-create-windows-8-a.html

How to enable Driver Verifier:

Start > type "verifier" without the quotes > Select the following options -

1. Select - "Create custom settings (for code developers)"
2. Select - "Select individual settings from a full list"
3. Check the following boxes -
- Special Pool
- Pool Tracking
- Force IRQL Checking
- Deadlock Detection
- Security Checks (Windows 7 & 8)
- DDI compliance checking (Windows 8)
- Miscellaneous Checks
4. Select  - "Select driver names from a list"
5. Click on the "Provider" tab. This will sort all of the drivers by the provider.
6. Check EVERY box that is NOT provided by Microsoft / Microsoft Corporation.
7. Click on Finish.
8. Restart.

Important information regarding Driver Verifier:

- If Driver Verifier finds a violation, the system will BSOD. To expand on this a bit more for the interested, specifically what Driver Verifier actually does is it looks for any driver making illegal function calls. When and/if this happens, system corruption occurs if allowed to continue. When Driver Verifier is enabled, it is monitoring all 3rd party drivers (as we have it set that way) and when it catches a driver attempting to do this, it will quickly flag that driver as being a troublemaker, and bring down the system safely before any corruption can occur.

- After enabling Driver Verifier and restarting the system, depending on the culprit, if for example the driver is on start-up, you may not be able to get back into normal Windows because Driver Verifier will detect it in violation almost straight away, and as stated above, that will cause / force a BSOD.

If this happens, do not panic, do the following:

- Boot into Safe Mode by repeatedly tapping the F8 key during boot-up.

- Once in Safe Mode - Start > Search > type "cmd" without the quotes.

- To turn off Driver Verifier, type in cmd "verifier /reset" without the quotes.
・    Restart and boot into normal Windows.

If your OS became corrupt or you cannot boot into Windows after disabling verifier via Safe Mode:

- Boot into Safe Mode by repeatedly tapping the F8 key during boot-up.

- Once in Safe Mode - Start > type "system restore" without the quotes.

- Choose the restore point you created earlier.

-- Note that Safe Mode for Windows 8 is a bit different, and you may need to try different methods: 5 Ways to Boot into Safe Mode in Windows 8 & Windows 8.1

How long should I keep Driver Verifier enabled for?

I recommend keeping it enabled for at least 24 hours. If you don't BSOD by then, disable Driver Verifier. I will usually say whether or not I'd like for you to keep it enabled any longer.

My system BSOD'd with Driver Verifier enabled, where can I find the crash dumps?

They will be located in %systemroot%\Minidump

Any other questions can most likely be answered by this article:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617

Regards,

Patrick

Debugger/Reverse Engineer.
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