Windows has detected an IP Address Conflict

Running W7 Home Prem 32BIT.

Secured Home Network.....Modem to Router....2 Desktops Wired\Ethernet connected to Router, 1 Printer..Wired\Ethernet connected to Router, 2 Wireless laps.

I have not changed anything on any of my PC, Printer or Network....which has been running for 8 mos since I Connected the printer to my network...and suddenly in the past 2 weeks I get the message "Windows has Detected an IP Address Conflict".  All Desktops and Laptops are acquiring IP address dynamically, Printer has an assigned address (Static Address); HP Tech had me set it this way because the printer kept changing IP addresses when left dynamically...and there were issues printing.  When I view Windows System Event Log the error shows the Conflict is with the Printers IP address (my Printers Static IP address ends in 1.5 and that is referenced in the System Event Log).

When I see this Conflict message, the only choice you have is to click Close....no other options offered.

Since I have not changed anything in my system\network....and all has been running without seeing this Conflict message....why have I now seen it several times in the past 3 weeks....and...how do I fix it.  The error message reads, Contact your Administrator for help....lots of help that is...I am the Administrator...and I have no idea what to do! 

* Please try a lower page number.

* Please enter only numbers.

* Please try a lower page number.

* Please enter only numbers.

Hi

Router DHCP is usually set for a range.

Like assign IPs from, 192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.50

Make sure that the Static IP assigned to the printer is out of the DHCP range, like (in the example)it can be 192.168.1.60

 


Jack-MVP Windows Networking. WWW.EZLAN.NET
Jack MVP, Microsoft Windows Desktop Experience-Networking.

www.EZLAN.net

5 people were helped by this reply

·

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Your response makes the fix sound easy....but my bet is it in not.  That is, it is not as easy as going into the printer and changing its Static IP address to lets say  192.168.2.0 ( I only have 5 devices on my Network, 2 desktops\wired, 2 Laptops, wireless...and the printer.  The printer is Wired to the Wireless Router.  Seems if I change the Printers IP address....I'll need to make changes in the 2 desktops and Laptops.......

Sure hope there is an easy way to accomplish the changes to avoid the IP address conflict....but my gut tells me otherwise.  I only see the IP Conflict message on 1 desktop...does that mean it is having the conflict and the other 3 PC's is not....not even sure this makes any difference. 

1 person was helped by this reply

·

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Hi

The conflict is with the IP in question not with the others.

Each device on the Network must have its own unique IP.

Configuring Printer, Servers, Routers, and other devices that are used by the Networked computers to Static IPs is actually a policy on good networks.

That makes sharing easy since Devices with Static IP are always the same address.

Changing a printer IP is not a "Humongous" challenge.

Many Routers can also can do IP reservation (aka Static DHCP).

Read the Router is manual if it can do it and follow the manual’s instructions

 

 

 


Jack-MVP Windows Networking. WWW.EZLAN.NET
Jack MVP, Microsoft Windows Desktop Experience-Networking.

www.EZLAN.net

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Thanks; you have been very helpful ....

It sounds like you are saying I should leave the Static IP address as is in the Printer and change the Dynamic IP's of the 2 desktops and 2 Laptops to Static.  I had been told Static Addresses can create issues, especially when connecting to your Internet provider....their Licensces can change.....so I have allowed the PC's to use Dynamic IP Addresses.  I know that Static IP Addresses can be safer and more reliable.....but would rather the fix be on the device that is the root, the printer...and leave the PC's as they are.  It just would seem changing the Printers IP address, which is the root of the problem....should be done....yet, as I wrote previously, that may not be an easy fix since once changed....the PC's would need some chnages to see and print to the printer.

So I'll keep digging in to hopefully come up with the steps to assign a new...higher Static IP Address to the printer....and leave the PC's with Dynamic IP Addresses......

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Hi

When you are behind a router with IPs like 192.168.x.x you are on a private network.

This IPs cannot go to the Internet (that is why you have a router). The ISP does not know and does not care about your private IPs.

The info that you got is pertaining to the external ISP IP and it is not relevant to your topology.

 


Jack-MVP Windows Networking. WWW.EZLAN.NET
Jack MVP, Microsoft Windows Desktop Experience-Networking.

www.EZLAN.net

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Thank you for all your help....I contacted HP and they said that they have never encountered this issue.  They described going into all 4 PC's and perhaps making changes so that after changing the Static IP address in the printer....the PC's would print.  They just did not sound convincing to me...so I decided to hold off.  They did provide instructions to go to Control panel\Devices and printers\the Printers Properities....Port Tab\Add Port\New Port..follow instructions....which were, enter name or IP address....I tried inserting the name of the printer (HP Officejet....) that did not work, then I tried entering 192.168.2.0 and that just kept tried to complete....   Had I changed the Static IP address in the Printer to 192.168.2.0....and followed the HP Instructions...entering 192.168.2.0...would this give me the results I am looking for?  All PC's would print to Printer...and there would be no need to make any changes in the PC's?  If so use 192.168.2.0...or go higher?

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

Denmarfl,

It sounds like you're a bit confused on how IP addresses work. Here's a general explanation:

One of the primary tasks of a router is to hand out IP addresses. The router is configured with an IP address scheme and DHCP range. The scheme is the192.168.2.X part of the IP address. In home networks, the first 3 numbers never change. The last number in the IP address differs per network device. You seem to have a good understanding between Dynamic and Static IP address so I'll skip that. The IP address DHCP range is the range of IP addresses the router is allowed to hand out dynamically. Everything outside that range is a safe IP address to set as static.

For example...

My router's IP address scheme is 192.168.2.X. I've configured my router's IP address DHCP range to be between 50 and 100. So I know anything between 192.168.2.50 and 192.168.2.100 should be considered taken because at anytime the router could hand out one of those IP addresses and cause a conflict. So when I'm configuring the static on my printer, I can choose anything between 1-49 and 101-254 since those are all open IP addresses.

All this to say, you need to log into your router and find out what the IP address range is. Once you know that, you can pick a static IP address for your printer that you know won't cause a conflict later down the road. 192.168.2.0 is (in most cases) not a valid IP address. You need to configure the printer's IP address and then create the New Port as suggested by HP.

Hope this helps explain things!


Cody C
Microsoft Answers Support Engineer
Visit our Microsoft Answers Feedback Forum and let us know what you think.
Instead of telling our young people to plan ahead, we should tell them to plan to be surprised.

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

I understand......my Router shows Starting 192.168.1.2 thru 192.168.1.51, so that means these IP addresses are used by the Router to assign an IP addres to a device connected to see.....and it can assign an IP address ranging from .12 to 1.51

I also saw this when accesses my Router:

Address Reservation

When you specify a reserved IP address for a PC on the LAN, that PC will always receive the same IP address each time it accesses the DHCP server. Reserved IP addresses should be assigned to servers that require permanent IP settings.

To Reserve An IP Address:

  1. Click the Add button.
  2. Select the radio button of the Computer you wish to add from the Address Reservation Table.
  3. If the Computer is not on the Address Reservation Table, enter the IP Address, MAC Address, and Device Name of the computer you wish to add.
  4. Click the Add button when finished.

To Edit A Reserved IP Address:

  1. Select the radio button next to the reserved address you want to edit.
  2. Click the Edit button.
  3. Edit the IP Address, MAC Address or Device Name.
  4. Click the Accept button when finished.

To Delete A Reserved IP Address:

  1. Select the radio button next to the reserved address you want to delete.
  2. Click the Delete button.

I clicked on ADD...and saw the 2 Devices that where currently powered on and assigned IP addresses, one of which was the Printer which is 192.168.1.5....and again, the Printers IP address is Static, all others are dymanic.  This almost makes me think that if I I bullet the Printers IP address....that the Router will RESERVE 192.168.1.5......always and ONLY for the Printer thereby no other Device could be assigned this IP address.....and if I am correct....I wouldn't get the "Windows has detected an IP Address Conflict" (and Windowns System Event Viewer report shows its this IP address ending in 1.5 that is the Conflict).....

Is this correct? Go ahead and use this RESERVE IP Address Feature of the Router?  I don't want to proceed if other issues could surface.....

 

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

You're exactly right! Not all routers offer this feature and the steps to use it differ on each box so I didn't mention it.

But yes, reserving the printer's IP address is a perfect solution to this issue! I say go for it!


Cody C
Microsoft Answers Support Engineer
Visit our Microsoft Answers Feedback Forum and let us know what you think.
Instead of telling our young people to plan ahead, we should tell them to plan to be surprised.

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

this is a classic Microsoft issue. Microsoft Corporation has supplied software that includes default network solutions that are not really solutions but real headaches for consumers. The issue with default static ip addresses assigned by Microsoft is that they are not editable by the end-user which means end users will always experience the ip conflict label whenever routers are unable to 'lease' an ip address to the NIC managed by the Ip properties of Microsoft's communication stack software. End users are not given access to controlling the rogue 169.254. whatever static ip address forcibly assigned to their NIC which leaves Windows users totally high and dry, marooned, without any help what so ever.
My advice to businesses around the UK is to reformat their hard drives and re-install windows v 7 v8 and hope this does not re-occur - which it does frequently

1 person was helped by this reply

·

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for marking this as the answer.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this response?

Thanks for your feedback.

* Please try a lower page number.

* Please enter only numbers.

* Please try a lower page number.

* Please enter only numbers.

 
 

Question Info


Last updated September 20, 2020 Views 27,475 Applies to: