Question

Q: Win 7 cannot connect to internet, found wireless & LAN network but cant access internet.

I updated my lenovo Y430 laptop to Windows 7 Home Premium about 6 months ago, it has been work fine until last week, I just cant connect to internet anymore. I used to use a wireless network, now it says it's connected to the network, but "no internet access" while the signal says it's fair. I also try to use wired internet, still no luck, and even worse, it says "Unidentified Network/No Internet Access".

I troubleshooted, this is the message it gave me: "Local Area Connection" doesn't have a valid IP Configuration"

I ran "ipconfig" in cmd and this is what is gives me:



C:\Windows\system32>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::e99e:3f78:35c3:7056%11
   Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.112.86
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

Tunnel adapter isatap.{B10AA6ED-FDE1-4A0B-A968-3E7DB87E4CCF}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter isatap.{F438E2F9-36AA-4DE2-8BAB-4A72511B70D2}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

C:\Windows\system32>

 

and I ran "ipconfig/all" this is what i got:



C:\Windows\system32>ipconfig/all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Salt-PC
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) WiFi Link 5100 AGN
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-16-EA-DC-69-22
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom NetLink (TM) Fast Ethernet
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-1E-EC-96-77-04
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::e99e:3f78:35c3:7056%11(Preferred)
   Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.112.86(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
   DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 234888940
   DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-10-38-1C-FD-00-1E-EC-61-19-2C

   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 85.255.112.123
                                       85.255.112.234
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{B10AA6ED-FDE1-4A0B-A968-3E7DB87E4CCF}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{F438E2F9-36AA-4DE2-8BAB-4A72511B70D2}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #2
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

please reply asap, HELP!!!

 

Thank you.

 

Sincerely,

Evan

 

Answer

A:

Hi

To use an Internet connection with two computers you beed a Router.

First step make the two computers are able to connect to the Router and work correctly.

That can be done without any Internet connection and has nothing to do with RR.

If the two computers can connect to the  Router while they are both On, then will see what to do about the Internet.

Wire Connection.

Follow this process to make sure that the network aspect of the laptop is On and configured correctly.

Check the Device Manager for valid Wire card entry.

http://www.ezlan.net/Win7/net_dm.jpg

If there is No valid entry, delete any Bogus Entry, and re-install the Wire card's Drivers.

Check the Network connections to make sure that you have a Local Area Connection Icon/Entry, and that the Properties of the Icon (right click on the Icon) are correctly configured with TCP/IPv4 protocol in the Network Connections Properties.

http://www.ezlan.net/Win7/net_connection_tcp.jpg

Log to the Router's menu from a working computer and make sure that the DHCP is On and it is configured to assign IPs that can cover the number of computer that are connected (few more will be even better).

Switch Off the computer and the Router, Reboot the Router, and the computer.

Right click on the Wire card Network Connection, choose Status, Details, and see if it got an IP and the rest of the settings.

Wireless.

Check the Device Manager for valid Wireless card entry.

http://www.ezlan.net/Win7/net_dm.jpg

If there is No valid entry, delete any Bogus Entry, and re-install the Wireless card's Drivers.

Check the Network connections to make sure that you have a Wireless Network Connection Icon/Entry, and that the Properties of the Icon (right click on the Icon) are correctly configured with TCP/IPv4 protocol in the Network Connections Properties.

http://www.ezlan.net/Win7/net_connection_tcp.jpg

Make sure that if there is a vendor's Wireless Utility the utility is Not Running together with the Windows native Wireless utility.

Make sure that No Firewall is preventing/blocking the Wireless components to get to the Network.

If everything above is OK and it is not connecting to the Wireless router. Log from any computer that is, or can be connected to Wireless Router with a Wire, disable the Wireless Security, make sure that the Wireless broadcast is On, and try to connect with No Wireless security.

When working turn On the Wireless security.

Note* People sometimes make mistakes in writing and retyping the security passphrase.

Alternative way is to copy it from the Router's menu, and then paste when asked by the Wireless card.

-------------


Jack MVP-Networking. EZLAN.NET
Jack MVP, Microsoft Windows Desktop Experience-Networking.

www.EZLAN.net

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Answer

A:

Yes.

Routers and switches are different types of network devices.  Routers are "smarter."  Switches direct network traffic among computers on a single network, while routers can act as the interface between two networks (e.g., the Internet and your Local Area Network). There are lots of explanatory pages on the Internet about this. Here'sone .

In fact, most "routers" sold for home use today incorporate both a router and a switch (and in the case of "wireless routers" also incorporate a wireless access point). Home routers typically also include a Network Address Translator (NAT ), a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server, a Domain Name Service (DNS) proxy server and a hardware firewall to protect the LAN from malicious intrusion from the Internet.

Your ISP, through your cable modem, "sees" the WAN port of the router as a computer (which it is) typically configured to obtain its IP address automatically.  The ISP's DHCP server assigns that port the single IP address that is allowed to you.  This is an "external" or "public" IP address, and it's the address that other computers elsewhere on the Internet use when they direct traffic to you.

The router's built-in DHCP server assigns "private" IP addresses to each of the computers connected to it (doesn't matter if they're connected by wire or wireless).  Typically, these are of the form 192.168.1.x  or 192.168.0.x, where x goes from 1 to 254.  These IP addresses are not "seen" by computers on the Internet.  Instead, the NAT function of the router directs traffic addressed to your public IP address to the correct one of your internal computers (and vice versa).

A switch can't do any of that.  If your ISP permitted, you could connect your switch directly to your modem and the ISP's DHCP server would assign aseparate public IP address to each computer connected to the switch.  Because your ISP doesn't permit more than one public IP address for your account, its DHCP server assigns such an address to the first computer it sees connected to the switch.  If more computers are then connected to the switch, the ISP's DHCP server simply ignores them: too bad, computer #2, you don't get an address, and thus you can't connect to the Internet.

-----
LemP
Volunteer Moderator
MS MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) 2006-2009
Microsoft Community Contributor (MCC) 2011-2012

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Sorry this didn't help.



 
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Views: 12,848 Last updated: March 13, 2018 Applies to: