LAN Status - IPv4 Connectivity: Internet / IPv6: No Network Access__

I have a new Windows 7 pc, and originally set up a home network with my router set for DHCP. It provided dynamic IP addresses for all my network devices, and all was well.

Then I followed instructions on how to forward a few ports on my router/firewall to permit Xbox Live gaming, and part of the process was to assign a static IP for the Windows 7 pc. Everything seemed to work out well, and then I noticed that my LAN Status indicated either "IPv6: No Network Access" or "IPv6: No Internet". IPv4 appears to be fine...I'm able to access the internet, and all still seems well.

My question is, do I need to worry about IPv6 connectivity issues at all? It doesn't seem to be affecting internet access. Will it cause any issues with my home network, preventing file sharing, etc.?

Hi,

No, don't worry at all about the IPv6 on a home network. In fact many have to
disable it.

IPv6
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6

Hope this helps.


Rob Brown - MS MVP - Windows Desktop Experience : Bicycle - Mark Twain said it right.
Rob Brown - past Microsoft MVP - Windows Insider MVP 2016 - 2021
Microsoft MVP Windows and Devices for IT 2009 - 2020

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Thanks Rob. I have a few laptops connected to my home network wirelessly, and two desktop computers that are hard-wired. I have experienced intermittent loss of internet access on the wireless laptops...even when they are only a few feet away from the router. COuld this also be due to an IPv6 problem?

Regarding disabling IPv6, are there any side effects? What can you lose on a computer and a home network when disabling IPv6?

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Hi,

Disable the IPv6 as you will not need it on a small network. You lose the ability to connect using
the v6 protocol which on a home network is zero.

Also try updating the WiFi and NIC drivers and updating the firmware on the router.

Home systems are often affected by distance, number or walls, heating/cooling ducts and other
interference. If the disconnects are on the wired connections then definitely suspect the router
(which can also affect the WiFi).

----------------------------------------------------

Check this :

Strange Problem with Internet Connection in Vista (and Windows 7)
http://www.catonett.com/blog/archives/194

Windows Vista cannot obtain an IP address from certain routers or from certain non-Microsoft DHCP servers
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/928233/en-us

----------------------------------------------------

And :

Using the Network troubleshooter in Windows 7
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Using-the-Network-troubleshooter-in-Windows-7

Troubleshoot network connection problems
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/help/33307acf-0698-41ba-b014-ea0a2eb8d0a81033.mspx

Why can’t I connect to a network?
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Why-can-t-I-connect-to-a-network

Hope this helps.


Rob Brown - MS MVP - Windows Desktop Experience : Bicycle - Mark Twain said it right.
Rob Brown - past Microsoft MVP - Windows Insider MVP 2016 - 2021
Microsoft MVP Windows and Devices for IT 2009 - 2020

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Usually IPv6 will not cause any problems. The side effect of disabling it on a Home network is that the Homegroup feature requires IPv6. If you do not use this feature then you probably won't notice a difference with IPv6 disabled. This applies to Home Networks only. If you are on a Work network IPv6 may be used if you have Windows Server 2008 or newer or Exchange 2007 or newer servers on the network.

To properly disable IPv6 requires a registry change. Just unticking it in the network properties can cause more problems than leaving it enabled. You should backup your system or at least create a system restore point prior to editing the registry.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852/en-us

 


Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Kerry Brown MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience

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In general there is no real need (yet) to IPv6 unless One is adamant about using HomeGroup.

I do not think that the TCP/IPv6 by itself is  the problem. The problem is that some Network peripherals, and the End-User system in general, are Not really ready for it.

So it is ending up a Hit or Miss story.

 

 


Jack-MVP Windows Networking. WWW.EZLAN.NET
Jack MVP, Microsoft Windows Desktop Experience-Networking.

www.EZLAN.net

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Thank you all for your excellent input. I am not comfortable messing with the Windows Registry, so I think I might as well just leave IPv6 alone. As I said, it doesn't seem to be causing any problems with my small home network. As for "Homegroup", my understanding is that it's only for Windows 7 computers, and since I only have one Windows 7 pc, it's not an issue at this time.

Now, when I eventually do add another Windows pc to my home network, what will Homegroup offer me over traditional home network sharing?

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 As for "Homegroup", my understanding is that it's only for Windows 7 computers, and since I only have one Windows 7 pc, it's not an issue at this time.

Hi

It is Not an issue even if you 10 Win 7 computers. I have few peer-to-peer networks based solely on Win 7, beside one, all are on Work Network because it provides the best flexibilty for LAN configuration.

One is using HomeGroup mainly for experimental reasons.

 


Jack-MVP Windows Networking. WWW.EZLAN.NET
Jack MVP, Microsoft Windows Desktop Experience-Networking.

www.EZLAN.net

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Last updated December 29, 2018 Views 11,407 Applies to: