Question
3216 views

‘DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE’ BSOD - Windows 7 Home Premium

Neox1x asked on
My new Thinkpad W530 laptop has been getting BSODs stating STOP ERROR 0x9F and DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE for the past month or so. I'm running Windows 7 Home Premium Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601 with the latest BIOS.

Any advice as to pinpointing the source of the problem would be much appreciated.

Also, it might just be a coincidence, but the past two times it occurred while I was watching a video on Youtube.

Previous fixes:

- Used BCDEdit to delete a certain value (resolved issue with unexpected reboots after resume from sleep)

- Disabled Microsoft Virtual WiFi Miniport Adapter (resolved issue with wifi not connecting after resume from sleep)

-Disabled Link State Power Management from advanced system options (no improvement in BSOD occurences)


Here is an analysis of the minidump from WhoCrashed:


On Thu 19/09/2013 9:19:04 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\Minidump\091913-12636-01.dmp
uptime: 07:29:49
This was probably caused by the following module:
ntkrnlmp.exe (nt!KeBugCheckEx+0x0)
Bugcheck code: 0x9F (0x3, 0xFFFFFA800A94DA10, 0xFFFFF80000B9C3D8, 0xFFFFFA800B3CD010)
Error:
DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
Bug check description: This bug check indicates that the driver is in an inconsistent or invalid power state.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver that cannot be identified at this time.

On Thu 19/09/2013 9:19:04 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\memory.dmp
uptime: 07:29:49
This was probably caused by the following module:
ntkrnlmp.exe (nt!KeBugCheckEx+0x0)
Bugcheck code: 0x9F (0x3, 0xFFFFFA800A94DA10, 0xFFFFF80000B9C3D8, 0xFFFFFA800B3CD010)
Error:
DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
Bug check description: This bug check indicates that the driver is in an inconsistent or invalid power state.
This appears to be a typical software driver bug and is not likely to be caused by a hardware problem.
The crash took place in the Windows kernel. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver that cannot be identified at this time.

Minidump Skydrive link: 
http://sdrv.ms/18E7zD9

1 person had this question

Abuse history


The answered status icon Answer
Patrick Barker replied on
Hi,

Both of the attached DMP files are of the DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE (9f) bugcheck.

This error occurs if drivers do not handle power state transition requests properly, usually during one of the following procedures: shut down, suspending or resuming from standby, suspending or resuming from hibernation.

If we run an !irp on the 4th parameter of the bugcheck (blocked IRP address), we get the following:

0: kd> !irp fffffa800b582aa0
Irp is active with 4 stacks 3 is current (= 0xfffffa800b582c00)
 No Mdl: No System Buffer: Thread 00000000:  Irp stack trace.  Pending has been returned
     cmd  flg cl Device   File     Completion-Context
 [  0, 0]   0  2 00000000 00000000 00000000-00000000   

            Args: 00000000 00000000 00000000 ffffffffc000000e
 [ 16, 0]   0  2 fffffa800a94ba10 00000000 fffff88005bba76c-fffffa800d44f7c0   
           \Driver\pci    nvlddmkm
            Args: 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
>[ 16, 2]   0 e1 fffffa800b84e040 00000000 fffff80002e7a6f0-fffffa8007a27350 Success Error Cancel pending
           \Driver\nvlddmkm    nt!IopUnloadSafeCompletion

nvlddmkm.sys
is the nVidia video driver.

Ensure you have the latest video card drivers. If you are already on the latest video card drivers, uninstall and install a version or a few versions behind the latest to ensure it's not a latest driver only issue. If you have already experimented with the latest video card driver and many previous versions, please give the beta driver for your card a try.

If the above does not help, I recommend removing and replacing avast! with Microsoft Security Essentials for temporary troubleshooting purposes

avast! removal tool - http://www.avast.com/uninstall-utility

MSE - http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security-essentials-download

If after all of the above you're still crashing, please enable Driver Verifier to look for further possible device driver corruption and or conflicts:

Driver Verifier:

What is Driver Verifier?

Driver Verifier is included in Windows 8, 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 to promote stability and reliability; you can use this tool to troubleshoot driver issues. Windows kernel-mode components can cause system corruption or system failures as a result of an improperly written driver, such as an earlier version of a Windows Driver Model (WDM) driver.

Essentially, if there's a 3rd party driver believed to be at issue, enabling Driver Verifier will help flush out the rogue driver if it detects a violation.

Before enabling Driver Verifier, it is recommended to create a System Restore Point:

Vista - START | type rstrui - create a restore point
Windows 7 - START | type create | select "Create a Restore Point"
Windows 8 - http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4690-restore-point-create-windows-8-a.html

How to enable Driver Verifier:

Start > type "verifier" without the quotes > Select the following options -

1. Select - "Create custom settings (for code developers)"
2. Select - "Select individual settings from a full list"
3. Check the following boxes -
- Special Pool
- Pool Tracking
- Force IRQL Checking
- Deadlock Detection
- Security Checks (Windows 7)
- Concurrentcy Stress Test (Windows 8)
- DDI compliance checking (Windows 8)
- Miscellaneous Checks
4. Select  - "Select driver names from a list"
5. Click on the "Provider" tab. This will sort all of the drivers by the provider.
6. Check EVERY box that is [B]NOT[/B] provided by Microsoft / Microsoft Corporation.
7. Click on Finish.
 8.    Restart.

Important information regarding Driver Verifier:

- If Driver Verifier finds a violation, the system will BSOD.

- After enabling Driver Verifier and restarting the system, depending on the culprit, if for example the driver is on start-up, you may not be able to get back into normal Windows because Driver Verifier will flag it, and as stated above, that will cause / force a BSOD.

If this happens, do not panic, do the following:

- Boot into Safe Mode by repeatedly tapping the F8 key during boot-up.

- Once in Safe Mode - Start > type "system restore" without the quotes.

- Choose the restore point you created earlier.
If you did not set up a restore point, do not worry, you can still disable Driver Verifier to get back into normal Windows:

- Start > Search > type "cmd" without the quotes.

- To turn off Driver Verifier, type in cmd "verifier /reset" without the quotes.
・    Restart and boot into normal Windows.

How long should I keep Driver Verifier enabled for?

It varies, many experts and analysts have different recommendations. Personally, I recommend keeping it enabled for at least 24 hours. If you don't BSOD by then, disable Driver Verifier.

My system BSOD'd, where can I find the crash dumps?

They will be located in %systemroot%\Minidump

Any other questions can most likely be answered by this article:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617

Regards,

Patrick
Debugger/Reverse Engineer.
1 person found this helpful

Abuse history


progress