Retain original creation date when copying or moving folders (Windows XP/7, Windows Server 2003/2008)

I know the default behaviour of (any version) Windows when copying or moving folders, is that Windows actually first creates a new folder, copies the content and when moving folders, deletes the source folder after succesful copy. In contrast to the Mac OS, where copy and move mechanisms assume that, when you copy a folder, the properties of the copied folder should have the same properties as the source folder, thus retaining the original creation date!

Is there any way to change this behaviour in Windows ? I know Robocopy in Windows Server 2008 has an option to retain folder creation dates, but I would like to know if you can change Windows 7/Windows Server 2008 to behave likewise.

It is very annoying that when you restore or copy a folder, the new folder has the creation date of current date, instead of the original creation date.  People tend to look for old folders which do no longer exist when you have copied or moved those folders.

Answer
Answer

Hi Kyung E,
 
There's no way to do this in windows. The Windows design is that the creation date refers to the file, while the modification date refers to the contents. If the creation date is really important to you, you could adjust it after the copy with a utility.

The easiest way is to right click on the file and drag it to your destination folder. it will ask you to copy or move it. If you move it, the create date will not change.

Yes, Robocopy is available in Windows 7.

Thanks and Regards:
Shalini Surana - Microsoft Support.
Visit our  Microsoft Answers Feedback Forum and let us know what you think.

7 people found this reply helpful

·

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn't help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

 
 

Question Info


Last updated November 25, 2020 Views 20,391 Applies to: