Question

Q: Will Upgrading Motherboard After Upgrading To Windows 10 Make Me Lose My Windows License? This thread is locked from future replies

In a recent official post in these forums this was stated... 

"If the hardware configuration of your Windows 10 device changes significantly (e.g. motherboard change) Windows may require re-activation on the device. This is the same experience as prior versions of Windows (e.g. Windows 7 and Windows 8.1).   The free upgrade offer will not apply to activation of Windows 10 in such scenarios where hardware changes reset Activation."

I had thought that it linked the license to your microsoft account and activated through that when you clean-installed after the upgrade, but this sounds like its hardware-ID based..  Does this mean if I upgrade my motherboard after using the free upgrade I would lose my Windows 10 license, and then have to go buy a copy of Windows 10, or would I be able to simply enter the key from my old 8.1 install during the Windows 10 install process after installing the new motherboard? 

I had planned to do an upgrade to the X99 platform within the next year, but this makes me worry that I will lose my license from the upgrade as soon as I put in the new hardware. 

Answer

A:

It really depends on the type of license that you had upgraded from.

When I upgrade a preinstalled (OEM) or retail version of Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 license to Windows 10, does that license remain OEM or become a retail license?

If you upgrade from a OEM or retail version of Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 to the free Windows 10 upgrade this summer, the license is consumed into it. Because the free upgrade is derived from the base qualifying license, Windows 10 will carry that licensing too.

If you upgrade from a retail version, it carries the rights of a retail version.

If you upgrade from a OEM version, it carries the rights of a OEM version.

Full version (Retail):

- Includes transfer rights to another computer.

- Doesn't require a previous qualifying version of Windows.

- Expensive

Upgrade version (Retail):

- Includes transfer rights to another computer.

- require a previous qualifying version of Windows.

- Expensive, but cheaper than full version

OEM :

OEM versions of Windows are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:

- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel

- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on

- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system

What happens if I change my motherboard?

As it pertains to the OEM licenses this will invalidate the Windows 10 upgrade license because it will no longer have a previous base qualifying license which is required for the free upgrade. You will then have to purchase a full retail Windows 10 license. If the base qualifying license (Windows 7 or Windows 8.1) was a full retail version, then yes, you can transfer it.

From the Windows 10 end user license agreement:

b. Stand-alone software. If you acquired the software as stand-alone software (and also if you upgraded from software you acquired as stand-alone software), you may transfer the software to another device that belongs to you. You may also transfer the software to a device owned by someone else if (i) you are the first licensed user of the software and (ii) the new user agrees to the terms of this agreement. You may use the backup copy we allow you to make or the media that the software came on to transfer the software. Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between devices.

Best,
Andre
Windows Insider MVP
MVP-Windows and Devices for IT
twitter/adacosta
groovypost.com

Did this solve your problem?

Sorry this didn't help.

79 people were helped by this reply



 
Question Info

Views: 107,924 Last updated: April 20, 2018 Applies to: