Can NOT start up my PC: HP Z440: Prepare Automatic Repair - Diagnosing your PC

Can NOT start up my PC: HP Z440

When booting up:

Prepare Automatic Repair - Diagnosing your PC

I see always

I have tried

1

Safe Mode, Uninstall the latest quality update, Restore back to point 18-10-2021 :

same symptom

2

Troubleshoot> Advanced options > Startup Repair:

same symptom

Status

Today in the morning I turn ON PC, I was offline[no cable ethernet], and while working prompt for an update[while was dis-connected], after this connected - checked some Gmail, etc. and after 30-min press UPDATE & RESTART,

And got this problem on startup...

well...?

I have a backup of C:/ with Acronis... I think of October 2021

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Hi Lse. I'm Greg, 10 years awarded Windows MVP, specializing in Installation, Performance, Troubleshooting and Activation, here to help you.

Here are steps to recover from failed Updates or Version Update install which cause Windows to fail to start or function. If any steps won't work then report back and move on to the next. At least one step will always work, leading up to if necessary doing an automated Reset or a gold standard Clean Install:

1) Try whichever method works in this tutorial link to get into Advanced Startup Options to run System Restore or Uninstall Updates button, or if this is a version update Go Back to Old Version: https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/2294-advanc....

Easiest is to restart or force shutdown the PC twice to force it into Repair Mode.

If you are able to access System Restore or Go Back and it fails, skip to step 3.

2) Go to another PC to create bootable media following instructions toward the bottom of the download page here: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/m.... Uncheck the box for recommended settings to use only those for the target PC. The bootable media has it's own set of files and drivers that may work better if the ones in Windows are corrupted, it is also the only method that doesn't require the password if you're stuck on that.

Boot media by powering up the PC while pressing the BIOS Boot Menu Key: https://www.sysnative.com/forums/hardware-tutor...

You may need to enter BIOS/UEFI Setup to turn off Fast Boot if it won't allow the Boot Menu key to interrupt starting Windows: https://www.mydigitallife.net/comprehensive-lis...

Choose UEFI version of media if offered, browse to second screen to Repair Your Computer link.

3) Choose Advanced Troubleshoot options to run System Restore, Uninstall Updates button, or if this was a version Update choose More Options to Go Back to Old Version.

If it rolls back then you can hide the Windows Updates and Version Upgrade responsible until they mature by installing and running immediately the Hide Updates tool:

If this fails try a Startup Repair, or go back to Troubleshoot Options on the previous screen to Reset your PC which will save your files while reinstalling Windows.

You could also at this point boot the Acronic rescue media to restore the image you have.

4) If that fails you can use the booted media created in Step 2 to Clean Install the latest version which should get you past all difficulties as it has hundreds of thousands of others who have followed the steps in this link and never come back to report another problem: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki... The link compiles the best possible install of Windows 10 that will stay that way as long as you stick with the tools and methods given.

There is a step to rescue files from the same bootable media: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki...

Make sure during the booted install to follow the illustrated steps to delete all partitions down to Unallocated Space to get it cleanest, then click Next to let it auto-create the needed partitions, format them and begin install - this makes it foolproof.

The media provided for the Clean Install is latest and normally the problems go away with the Clean Install, however if they don't you can find earlier version media to use here: https://tb.rg-adguard.net/public.php
Burn to DVD using Windows Image Burner or create bootable 8+gb flash stick installer using one of the methods here: https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/2376-create...

Then once you're back in Windows 10, you can block the problem Update using one of these methods: https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/8280-hide-s...

For Version Updates the most stable method to install is using the media as shown in these steps for overcoming Version Upgrade problems: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki...

All possible ways to control Updates now are here:
https://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-to-con...


I hope this helps. Feel free to ask back any questions and let us know how it goes. I will keep working with you until it's resolved.

______________________________________________
Standard Disclaimer: There are links to non-Microsoft websites. The pages appear to be providing accurate, safe information. Watch out for ads on the sites that may advertise products frequently classified as a PUP (Potentially Unwanted Products). Thoroughly research any product advertised on the sites before you decide to download and install it.
_________________

Windows MVP 2010-20

Millions helped via my tutorials and personally in forums for 12 years. Now an Independent Advisor.

I do not quit for those who are polite and cooperative.

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How To Fix A HP In A Preparing Automatic Repair Restart Loop [2021]

TRIED ^^ But

after chkdsk d: /f /r

same symptom [d: is my C:/]

AT https://youtu.be/E97P-SkzZoI?t=181

he PUT c:

Commands:

bootrec /fixmbr

bootrec /fixboot

bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup

attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s

ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old

bootrec /rebuildbcd

But initially, he put d: at--- chkdsk d: /f /r ... is he CORRECT??

lse

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see above,

is OK to try this YouTube Troubleshooting...?

I already ran: chkdsk d: /f /r

d: is my C:/

Is it OK to run the below with C: ...???

Commands:

bootrec /fixmbr

bootrec /fixboot

bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup

attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s

ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old

bootrec /rebuildbcd

chkdsk d: /f /r

lse

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====

Also, in addition, reply

bootrec /fixmbr

Is ok, apply, even the disk is GPT…?

lse

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I would say that if you have Windows 10 ransomware protection set up and running in the back ground it might just be easier to clear your drive and reinstall Windows altogether and just re-download everything from Microsoft one drive

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What you mean by saying:

"Windows 10 ransomware protection set up and running in the back ground"

that If I am infected, or compromised, and best RESET or REINSTALL Windows 10...?

here >>>>
How To Fix A HP In A Preparing Automatic Repair Restart Loop [2021]
How To Fix A HP In A Preparing Automatic Repair Restart Loop [2021] - YouTube



Commands:

chkdsk d: /f /r

<check booting, if failure again loop cont...>

bootrec /fixmbr
bootrec /fixboot
bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup
attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s
ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old
bootrec /rebuildbcd

=====
that I ask is:
the 1st command is d:/ [d: is Boot disk C: DRIVE]
1
subsequent commands have to put c: even initially insert d: ... ?
2
bootrec /fixmbr
even my c: disk is GPT... and Not MBR..?

===

this was also posted and here:

https://www.tenforums.com/general-support/186730-loop-prepare-automatic-repair-diagnosing-your-pc-error.html#post2316736

lse

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I got the Log file

SrtTrail.txt

SEE BELOW>>> // ANY CONCLUSION...???

Startup Repair diagnosis and repair log

---------------------------

Last successful boot time: ‎10/‎12/‎2021 6:25:29 AM (GMT)

Number of repair attempts: 35

Session details

---------------------------

System Disk = \Device\Harddisk1

Windows directory = D:\WINDOWS

AutoChk Run = 0

Number of root causes = 1

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for updates

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: System disk test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk failure diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk metadata test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 672 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk metadata test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Target OS test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 31 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Volume content check

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 94 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Boot manager diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: System boot log diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Event log diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 15 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Internal state check

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 16 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for installed LCU

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 3906 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for installed driver updates

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 1297 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for pending package install

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 2750 ms

Root cause found:

---------------------------

A recently serviced boot binary is corrupt.

---------------------------

---------------------------

Session details

---------------------------

System Disk = \Device\Harddisk1

Windows directory = D:\WINDOWS

AutoChk Run = 0

Number of root causes = 1

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for updates

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: System disk test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk failure diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk metadata test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 47 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk metadata test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Target OS test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 16 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Volume content check

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Boot manager diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: System boot log diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Event log diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 15 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Internal state check

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for installed LCU

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 4391 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for installed driver updates

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 1656 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for pending package install

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 3235 ms

Root cause found:

---------------------------

A recently serviced boot binary is corrupt.

Repair action: Abort pending update installations

Result: Failed. Error code = 0x82f

Time taken = 4734 ms

---------------------------

---------------------------

Session details

---------------------------

System Disk = \Device\Harddisk1

Windows directory = D:\WINDOWS

AutoChk Run = 0

Number of root causes = 1

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for updates

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: System disk test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk failure diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 15 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk metadata test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 719 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Disk metadata test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 16 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Target OS test

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 15 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Volume content check

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 78 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Boot manager diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: System boot log diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 16 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Event log diagnosis

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 16 ms

Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Internal state check

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 0 ms

Root cause found:

---------------------------

Startup Repair has tried several times but still cannot determine the cause of the problem.

---------------------------

---------------------------

lse

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How can i reset windows updates in Windows 10, if cannot boot the PC...?

lse

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Test Performed:

---------------------------

Name: Check for pending package install

Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0

Time taken = 2750 ms

Root cause found:

---------------------------

A recently serviced boot binary is corrupt.

*********************************************************

=========================================

IF BOOT IN CMD PROMPT --- FROM ADVANCED OPTIONS

IF D: Is my C:/ disk

I already ran:

chkdsk d: /f /r

it failure again loop continues... then is OK run: // if yes for c: put c: or d:

bootrec /fixmbr


bootrec /fixboot


bcdedit /export c:\bcdbackup


attrib c:\boot\bcd -h -r -s


ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old


bootrec /rebuildbcd

lse

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One thing: Have you switched in BIOS from UEFI to Legacy or vice versa? Then, that could be the whole problem -- just switch it back & try to boot. Otherwise...

It does look like D: is your Windows drive in the recovery environment going by those SrtTrail.txt reports. But you can doublecheck with DiskPart as in the following. Then, the main thing will be to determine whether you've got a UEFI or a Legacy boot. And let's do a BCDBoot (instead of BootRec) because BCDBoot also repairs other boot files, not just the BCD.

(1) Have you backed up your user files? If not, here is a way at a Command Prompt...

(a) Plug in a USB drive on which to copy your files.

(b) Get to the Recovery Environment from that error message (Advanced Options button).

(c) At the "Choose an Option" screen,

     click "Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > Command Prompt".

(c) Enter Notepad at the Command Prompt. It opens in GUI mode.

(d) In its File menu, select Open.

(e) Set Notepad to display all file types with its requestor at bottom.

The files you want are likely in the folders at "C:\Users\<your user name>". Remember to Refresh the screen after a paste. Additional notes...

o  Notepad's left pane has only "Quick Access", "Libraries", & "This PC".

o  Click This PC to switch from C: to the USB drive & vice versa.

o  Double-click a drive or folder in the right pane to open it. Or just select it, then click the Open button at bottom. But ensure nothing is in the filename box, or you get an error message (if it isn't a text file).

o  Right-click a file or folder, & select Copy. That seemed instantaneous.

o  Go to the USB drive, right-click in Notepad's right pane, & select Paste.

     I had an hourglass for just about a minute - or was it two - for 1.3 GB.

o  When the normal pointer reappears, right-click in the right pane, & select Refresh - or I think you never will see it.

(2) Regenerate the BCD (Boot Configuration Data) & other boot files at the Command Prompt...

(a) Enter these commands...

DiskPart          <<<Enter DiskPart

List  Vol           <<<Show the drive letters

Exit                  <<<Leave DiskPart

Here's what mine looks like in the recovery environment...

DISKPART> List Vol

  Volume ### Ltr    Label            Fs              Type            Size     Status        Info

  -------------  --- -----------    ---------   ----------    --------- -----------   --------

  Volume 0      D                                        DVD-ROM        0 B  No Media

  Volume 1      C  PCR Hard     NTFS         Partition      930 GB  Healthy                <<<My Windows partition

  Volume 2          ESP               FAT32        Partition        99 MB Healthy      Hidden     <<<EFI System partition

  Volume 3          WinRE NTFS         Partition      847 MB Healthy

DISKPART> Exit

Leaving DiskPart...

(b) Identify your Windows partition by its Label & Size, then enter...

BCDBoot  D:\Windows            <<<Presuming your Windows partition is D: in that environment

That's the simplest form of that command. It uses default values for everything else. (If your language is not En-US, then see below to add a proper /L locale parameter). If it fails, we can try giving it more parameters. In that case, can you tell which is your system partition? In my UEFI install, it is Volume 2 with the label ESP (EFI System Partition). It is FAT32 & about 100 MB. I would put a letter on it...

DiskPart

Select  Vol  2              <<<But select your own volume number, not mine

Assign  Letter=S        <<<Give it letter S:

Exit

Then...

BCDBoot  C:\Windows  /s  S:  /f  UEFI  /L  en-US

Notes:

(a) If yours is a Legacy install, it will be different. Put the letter on the System Reserved partition which likely is NTFS & also about 100 MB, if there is one. And use "/f  BIOS" instead of UEFI. Also, we'd want to ensure the System Reserved partition is the Active one. For that, add the command "Active" between Assign & Exit above. So, it would be...

DiskPart

Select  Vol  2              <<<But select your own volume number, not mine

Assign  Letter=S        <<<Give it letter S: (unless it already has one)

Active                         <<<Make it the Active partition

Exit

BCDBoot  D:\Windows  /s  S:  /f  BIOS  /L  en-US          <<<Use your letters, not mine

If there is no System Reserved partition, forget the letter S: & just use...

BCDBoot  D:\Windows  /L  en-US                    <<<Use your letter for the Windows partition

(b) Get the Locale value from BCDEdit...

C:\WINDOWS\system32>BCDEdit

Windows Boot Manager

--------------------

identifier        {bootmgr}

device            partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1     <<<What is your Device value? It will indicate whether

                                                                                             there is a system partition at all. Sometimes there is

                                                                                             none, then C: doubles as the System partition

path               \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi

description     Windows Boot Manager

locale             en-US                                                    <<<Locale

inherit             {globalsettings}

default            {current}

resumeobject          {f8d976f9-df94-11ea-b1d0-74e6e2074932}

displayorder            {current}

toolsdisplayorder    {memdiag}

timeout                   30

Windows Boot Loader

-------------------

identifier                 {current}

device                     partition=C:

path                        \WINDOWS\system32\winload.efi <<<Does yours mention EFI here?

                                                                                             If not, then it is a Legacy install.

description             Windows 10

locale                      en-US

inherit                     {bootloadersettings}

recoverysequence               {f8d976fc-df94-11ea-b1d0-74e6e2074932}

displaymessageoverride     CommandPrompt

recoveryenabled     Yes

isolatedcontext       Yes

allowedinmemorysettings   0x15000075

osdevice                 partition=C:

systemroot             \WINDOWS

resumeobject         {f8d976f9-df94-11ea-b1d0-74e6e2074932}

nx                           OptIn

bootmenupolicy    Standard

I think that should do it. Post back any further question. Good luck.

________________________
PCR

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Last updated October 27, 2021 Views 240 Applies to: