Some fonts are missing after upgrade

Symptom

Some users have found that certain fonts they use are missing after upgrading to Windows 10.

For example, if the English (or German, Spanish...) version of Windows 10 was installed, then the Gautami, Meiryo, Narkism... font is missing.

Cause

Many fonts that shipped in prior versions of Windows have been moved into optional features in Windows 10. After upgrading to Windows 10, these optional features may not be installed on your system. The result is that the fonts in those optional features will not be present.

If you need to use a font in one of these optional features, any of them can be installed on any Windows 10 system, as explained below.

Background

Since Windows Vista, every Windows system has included all Windows fonts. Windows supports many languages, and many of the fonts are intended primarily for use with particular languages.

For example, the Meiryo or Raavi font can be used for English, but they were added to Windows to support other languges: Meiryo was created to support Japanese; Raavi was created to support Panjabi or other languages written in Gurmukhi script. Most English (or German, Arabic, Ukrainian...) speakers don't use Gurmukhi or Japanese writing, but they still would all have these fonts on their system, and many others intended for particular languages.

Having fonts that aren't needed or being used provides no benefit, but they take up system resources and clutter up font lists with options that have no relevance. In order to optimize system resources and user experience using fonts, many fonts that were included in Windows 8.1 were moved into optional features in Windows 10. A comprehensive list of the font families in each of the optional features is provided below.

All of these fonts are organized into optional features that are associated with particular languages. For example, the DaunPenh, Khmer UI and MoolBoran fonts were all designed primarily to support Khmer, and are now in the Khmer Supplemental Fonts feature.

While all these international fonts have been moved into optional features, every Windows 10 system still includes fonts that provide comprehensive coverage of international languages and the Unicode character encoding standard. So, you don't need any of these optional features installed if, for instance, you occasionally browse in Edge to sites that have Chinese, Hebrew or Tamil text.

In addition to these fonts from previous versions of Windows, there are also some new fonts added in Windows 10 intended for use with English and other European languages that are included in an optional feature, Pan-European Supplemental Fonts. (See below for details on the fonts provided with this feature.) This optional feature does not have any language associations. If you'd like to use these fonts, you'll need to manually install this optional feature, as described below.

Automatic installation of optional font features based on language associations

As described above, most of the optional font features have particular language associations. These are automatically installed if you installed the associated language version of Windows. For example, if you do a clean install or upgrade using the Thai version of Windows 10, then the Thai Supplemental Fonts feature will be automatically included during the setup.

The language-associated font features are also installed automatically based on other language settings. In particular, if you add a language into your user profile (which is the same as enabling a keyboard for the language), then any association optional font feature will be installed automatically at that time.

When upgrading from Windows 8 or Windows 8.1, language settings that were configured prior to the upgrade will also be detected during the upgrade, and any associated optional font feature will be installed during the upgrade. Similarly, if you add a user with an existing Microsoft Account that has roamed settings that were originally configured on a Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 system, when the language roam into the Windows 10 system, any associated optional font features will be automatically installed.

If upgrading from Windows 7, keyboards for additional languages that were enabled on the Windows 7 system will be detected and used to configure language settings in Windows 10. At this time, associated optional font features will not be automatically installed during the upgrade process. However, some time after the upgrade is complete, a maintenance task will detect the language settings and install the associated optional font features. It may take a few days before this happens. Until then, you can always install any optional font feature manually using the steps described below.

Installing optional language-associated features by adding a language to your settings

If you want to use some of the fonts in an optional feature and you know that you will want to view Web pages, edit documents or use apps in the language associated with that feature, then you should add that language into your user profile. This is done in Settings; here are the steps, using Hebrew as an example:

  • Click the Start button.
  • Click Settings.
  • In Settings, click Time & language.
  • Click Region & language.
  • If Hebrew is not included in the list of languages, click the "+" icon next to Add a language.
  • Scroll to find Hebrew, then click on it to add it to your language list.

Once you have added Hebrew to your language list, then the optional Hebrew font feature and other optional features for Hebrew language support will be installed. This should only take a few minutes.

Note: The optional features are installed by Windows Update. You need to be online for the Windows Update service to work.

Also note: If you are on a work machine, some businesses manage updates separately, in which case the optional features might not install. If that's your situation, please get help from your system administrator.

Installing optional features independent of language settings

Any or all of the optional font features can be installed manually without needing to change language settings.

If you want to install all of the optional font packages and are running version 1607 (build 14393) or later, there's a link in the Fonts control panel to allow you to do that. (In earlier Windows 10 versions, you'll need to add each of the optional features separately, as described below.) Here are the steps:

  • Open the Fonts control panel:
    • Method 1: Click the Start button and type "fonts"; a link to the Fonts control panel should appear in the Start menu.
    • Method 2: Open the Run dialog: press Win+R, or right-click on the Start button and select Run. Then enter "fonts" and enter.
  • In the left pane of the Fonts control panel, click the link "Download fonts for all languages":

You can also install individual font features. Here's how—I'll use the Hebrew Supplemental Fonts feature as an example:

  • Click the Start button.
  • In Settings, click System.
  • Click Apps & features.
  • Click on the link, Manage optional features.
  • If "Hebrew Supplemental Fonts" is not listed among the installed features, click on the "+" icon next to Add a feature.
  • Scroll to find "Hebrew Supplemental Fonts". Click on that item, then click on Install.
  • Click on the back arrow in the upper corner of the window.

You should see the Hebrew feature in the list as installed or in the process of being installed.

After installing optional font features, the fonts should appear in the Fonts control panel and in font-picker lists. Some apps might not detect the change until the app is re-started. If you still don't see some of the fonts, sign out and sign back in. A reboot should not be required.

Note: The optional features are installed by Windows Update. You need to be online for the Windows Update service to work.

Also note: If you are on a work machine, some businesses manage updates separately, in which case the optional features might not even be visible to you—when you go into Add a feature, you might not see the optional features listed. If that's your situation, please get help from your system administrator.

Fonts included in optional font features

Here's a comprehensive listing of which font families are included with each of the optional font features. Some font families may include multiple fonts for different weights and styles.

Arabic Script Supplemental Fonts: Aldhabi, Andalus, Arabic Typesetting, Microsoft Uighur, Sakkal Majalla, Simplified Arabic, Traditional Arabic, Urdu Typesetting
Bangla Script Supplemental Fonts: Shonar Bangla, Vrinda
Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics Supplemental Fonts: Euphemia
Cherokee Supplemental Fonts: Plantagenet Cherokee
Chinese (Simplified) Supplemental Fonts: DengXian, FangSong, KaiTi, SimHei
Chinese (Traditional) Supplemental Fonts: DFKai-SB, MingLiU, MingLiU_HKSCS, PMingLiU
Devanagari Supplemental Fonts: Aparajita, Kokila, Mangal, Sanskrit Text, Utsaah
Ethiopic Supplemental Fonts: Nyala
Gujarati Supplemental Fonts: Shruti
Gurmukhi Supplemental Fonts: Raavi
Hebrew Supplemental Fonts: Aharoni Bold, David, FrankRuehl, Gisha, Levanim MT, Miriam, Miriam Fixed, Narkism, Rod
Japanese Supplemental Fonts: Meiryo, Meiryo UI, MS Gothic, MS PGothic, MS UI Gothic, MS Mincho, MS PMincho, Yu Mincho
Kannada Supplemental Fonts: Tunga
Khmer Supplemental Fonts: DaunPenh, Khmer UI, MoolBoran
Korean Supplemental Fonts: Batang, BatangChe, Dotum, DotumChe, Gulim, GulimChe, Gungsuh, GungsuhChe
Lao Supplemental Fonts: DokChampa, Lao UI
Malayalam Supplemental Fonts: Karthika
Odia Supplemental Fonts: Kalinga
Pan-European Supplemental Fonts: Arial Nova, Georgia Pro, Gill Sans Nova, Neue Haas Grotesk, Rockwell Nova, Verdana Pro
Sinhala Supplemental Fonts: Iskoola Pota
Syriac Supplemental Fonts: Estrangelo Edessa
Tamil Supplemental Fonts: Latha, Vijaya
Telugu Supplemental Fonts: Gautami, Vani
Thai Supplemental Fonts: Angsana New, AngsanaUPC, Browallia New, BrowalliaUPC, Cordia New, CordiaUPC, DilleniaUPC, EucrosiaUPC, FreesiaUPC, IrisUPC, JasmineUPC, KodchiangUPC, Leelawadee, LilyUPC

 

Discussion Info


Last updated October 16, 2018 Views 100,570 Applies to:

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This was very helpful. I often used the David font when creating fliers in Word 2013. I had no idea it was designed for Hebrew; it worked fine in English. I actually thought the design had a Japanese vibe to it. This discussion explains why the fliers I saved prior to updating to Windows 10 now open with David replaced with another larger font that throws off the layout. I send my Word documents to others who save the files. If I add the Hebrew fonts so that my old files will open correctly and continue to use the David font, I assume that anyone receiving them who has updated to Windows 10 will have the same problem opening them.

There were times in the past when I copied text created by others in fonts that were not in my Word font list, but Word still recognized them and I could even add text in that font. So it seems to me Microsoft could have designed the update so that Word would still open old files or files created in other Word releases correctly.

Hi, MargaretWalter_943

Yes, you are right: others receiving Word documents you've sent that use the David font may not have that font present on their system and see the document displayed with some other font. There's a sense in which this isn't really a new issue. Let me explain what I mean.

When you send documents to others as Word files, there has always been an issue that they may not have the fonts you used. This is kind of obvious if you were using custom fonts from a third-party source, of course. But even when using Windows fonts, some people uninstall fonts they don't use to clear away clutter from their font lists or thinking that it will speed up their system to have fewer fonts.

So, in general, this issue isn't new in Windows 10, though it's true that we've increased the chance someone would encounter this for particular fonts such as David.

There are ways you can avoid any uncertainty about what fonts will be present on the other person's system, even when using custom fonts. First, if your situation is one in which others need to be able to read the documents you send, but they don't need to be able to edit them, then you can save documents in Word to either PDF or XPS format. When saving to these formats, any necessary font data gets stored in the file itself, ensuring that it can be displayed correctly on any system. You'll find these options in the "Save as type" portion of Word's Save As dialog:

Or, you can also save Word files with the fonts embedded. This allows the file to be viewed in Word on another device using the font you used, even if that wasn't installed on the other device; and it also allows the other user to edit the document using that font. This option is also found in Word's Save As dialog, though it's a little harder to discover. First, click on "Tools" next to the Save button and select "Save Options...":

You can also go into Word options another way and then select the Save tab. At the bottom of the Save settings, you'll find a section, "Preserve fidelity when sharing this document":

By default, this is disabled. If you check the "Embed fonts in the file" option, then the next to options become enabled. Clearing the second checkbox would be good if others need to be able to edit the document.

Note in particular the third checkbox: it's set by default. If you clear it, as shown here, then the David font will be present when opened in Word even if the other person has Windows 10 and doesn't have the Hebrew Supplemental Fonts feature installed. Moreover, it would ensure that David or any other font such as Arial would be present in case the other person (using Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 7 or whatever) has uninstalled those fonts from their system.

If you're using third-party fonts, there is one small issue you might encounter when using either of the approaches I've mentioned: some font licenses do not permit embedding, and so can't be saved within a Word, PDF or XPS file. This doesn't apply to any of the Windows fonts, however. You can discover the embedding permissions of any of your fonts using the Details view of the Fonts control panel: it has a "Font embeddability" column.

We're interested in your feedback on these changes, and on use of alternate methods that I've described here. We want to find ways to improve user experiences, and that includes not putting a lot of fonts on people's devices that they'll never use, but also making sure that someone like you still gets fonts that they have used and want to continue using. Submitting feedback via the Windows Feedback app would be appreciated.

I hope the additional information I've provided here is helpful.

Thanks for the info.

Since you are fonts knowledgeable, I am hoping you can point me at a tool I am looking for.  I would like to take advantage of the "advanced" features available in Unicode, things like ligatures.  The problem is, I haven't found any way of figuring out what features are available in a specific font.  The Windoze Fonts applet does nothing to show these features.  In Word, you can apply the features to select text, but that takes a lot of time.

Is there a tool that can demonstrate all of the Unicode features in a given font?

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****** ****** ******** ******** ******* ******* ******
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When things are bad, you can either:
- cuss,
- cry or
- laugh ...

Why not choose to laugh

Hi, Rohn007

This is a good question. For fonts you already own, it's actually not a simple one to answer. The quick answer is to check in the apps that you use to see what's exposed. For acquiring new fonts, there are several retail portals for better-quality fonts, and if you deal with these sites they will often provide the information you're looking for.

Fonts you already have — the longer answer:

Microsoft created a utility many years ago call the OpenType Font Properties Extension. It was a shell extension that allowed you to right-click on a font file and see detailed information about the font, including the set of OpenType "features" it supports. This hasn't been funded in a long while, though, You may still be able to find it on http://www.microsoft.com/typography, but you might need an older version of Windows to actually use it. But if you do find it and are able to use it, then there's the challenge of how to make sense of the details about OpenType features. You see, the OpenType Layout mechanisms, of which font features is a part, are used for two distinct kinds of things:

  • Basic language functionality, such as getting combining diacritic marks positioned correctly on a base character or selecting the correct connecting form in Arabic script.
  • Advanced typographic capabilities.

All of these use a "feature" to activate certain glyph operations on a particular range of characters. The first is mandatory and handled automatically within software. The second is intended to be at the discretion of a document author, with some typically enabled by default and others not.

What I think you're interested in is the latter set of capabilities in a font. But a utility that exposes the OpenType features supported in a font, such as the Font Properties Extension, will probably show you all of them.

In the end, what will matter most to you is what can be used in the content-creation apps that you use. So, checking the font in your apps may be the most relevant way to check.

Acquiring new fonts:

There are various font retailers that deal in better-quality fonts, and these often show additional info about the features supported by a font. (People often go to sites that have free fonts for download, but don't expect to see the kinds of functionality you're asking about from the fonts on those sites.) Fontspring.com, is one site that does this quite well: when you browse to a particular font, there is an "OpenType" tab that will show you all of the advanced typographic capabilities of the font — just what you're looking for — including the additional glyphs that can be accessed using that feature. See the page for Myriad Pro, for instance:

http://www.fontspring.com/fonts/adobe/myriad-pro

Fonts.com also provides information about this kind of functionality, though they don't show the glyph-level of detail. See, for instance, this page for Palatino nova Light:

http://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/palatino-nova/light

Some vendor sites also allows you to search for fonts that support particular features.

Thanks Peter. 

I think the Font Properties Extension is the sort of thing I was looking for.  I am looking for more information about the fonts installed with Windows (I don't have a need to buy custom fonts, so far ... )

Your link didn't work, but I was able to google it to this page:

https://www.microsoft.com/typography/truetypeproperty21.mspx

That is version 2.30 dated June 2009. 

I installed it on Win 8.0 but it does not appear to work.  It is hard to tell. It is intended for True Type and Open Type fonts.  In Explorer, the Win 8 Fonts folder displays a custom view that hides file extensions no matter what I do.  And I don't recognize the icons.  But none of the fonts I looked at displayed the additional properties exposed by the tool.

Thanks for the lead

*
****** ****** ******** ******** ******* ******* ******
*

When things are bad, you can either:
- cuss,
- cry or
- laugh ...

Why not choose to laugh

I have the same problem. I use the Aharoni font frequently - I like the boldness and style of the characters in English and use it somewhere in virtually all my spreadsheets.

I followed the above instructions and installed the Hebrew supplemental fonts and got a message to say that this had been successful.

However, when I open up Word or Excel, I cannot see these fonts on my list of available ones to choose from - so how can I use them? Maybe someone from Microsoft can enlighten me as to why I still cant access these supplemental fonts despite installing them?

It seems that this "upgrade" to optimize user experience, has actually worsened it rather than improve it - it certainly has in my case. If I can not access the font I need I now have to waste hundreds of hours going through all my spreadsheets in order to amend everything which is in Aharoni to something else which I don't really want!! The majorityof my spreadsheets have over 60-70 tabs in them and this "minor change" is actually going to be a "Major work" for me which I could well do without!!

There is an old saying in life - "if it aint broke, don't fix it". Perhaps that should have applied here too....??

I have the same problem. I use the Aharoni font frequently - I like the boldness and style of the characters in English and use it somewhere in virtually all my spreadsheets.

I followed the above instructions and installed the Hebrew supplemental fonts and got a message to say that this had been successful.

However, when I open up Word or Excel, I cannot see these fonts on my list of available ones to choose from - so how can I use them? Maybe someone from Microsoft can enlighten me as to why I still cant access these supplemental fonts despite installing them?

It seems that this "upgrade" to optimize user experience, has actually worsened it rather than improve it - it certainly has in my case. If I can not access the font I need I now have to waste hundreds of hours going through all my spreadsheets in order to amend everything which is in Aharoni to something else which I don't really want!! The majorityof my spreadsheets have over 60-70 tabs in them and this "minor change" is actually going to be a "Major work" for me which I could well do without!!

There is an old saying in life - "if it aint broke, don't fix it". Perhaps that should have applied here too....??

Same here except my issue currently is the entire Helvetica font family that is now gone, and I have a deadline to complete a project needing specifically that font type.

Please help ASAP.

Hi, mindlord70.

I can't think of any reason why the Helvetica family might not be working for you. If you run this command from a command prompt (console) window, do you see entries for your Helvetica fonts?

reg query "HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Fonts" /v "h*"

What version of Office and Windows do you have?

Windows fonts

https://www.microsoft.com/typography/fonts/ - MS Typography, Fonts by product or family

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/goglobal/bb688099.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396#W10 - Script and Font Support in Windows 10 - 2000

Links to Fonts That Are Installed with MS Office …

Fonts that are installed with Microsoft Office  2013, see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2800393

Fonts that are installed with Microsoft Office 2010, see 2121313.

Fonts that are installed with Microsoft Office 2007, see 924623.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/918791 Overview of fonts and how to troubleshoot font problems in Microsoft Word 2007

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=918789 - Fonts are missing when you click the Font list on the Home tab in Word 2007

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/313487 Overview of fonts and troubleshooting for fonts in Word 2003, Word 2002 and Word 2000

837463 - Fonts that are installed with Microsoft Office 2003, Microsoft Office XP, and Microsoft Office 2000

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=276515  Fonts are missing from the Font list when you click the Font box on the Formatting toolbar in Word 2003

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=310307 - Missing TrueType Fonts in WordPad and Microsoft Word 2002

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=169330 - Missing TrueType Fonts in WordPad and Microsoft Word 2002

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=291354 - Some fonts that were available in Word 95 are no longer available in Word 2002

Some fonts are missing after Win 10 upgrade

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-start/some-fonts-are-missing-after-upgrade/95839dfa-0df2-4bc0-875a-fd6b57e61fe4

Windows substituting Arial font for Helvetica

http://office-watch.com/t/n.aspx?a=2018

Windows and Office gives you Arial font when you ask for Helvetica.

*
****** ****** ******** ******** ******* ******* ******
*

When things are bad, you can either:
- cuss,
- cry or
- laugh ...

Why not choose to laugh

I have the same problem. I use the Aharoni font frequently - I like the boldness and style of the characters in English and use it somewhere in virtually all my spreadsheets.

I followed the above instructions and installed the Hebrew supplemental fonts and got a message to say that this had been successful.

However, when I open up Word or Excel, I cannot see these fonts on my list of available ones to choose from - so how can I use them? Maybe someone from Microsoft can enlighten me as to why I still cant access these supplemental fonts despite installing them?

It seems that this "upgrade" to optimize user experience, has actually worsened it rather than improve it - it certainly has in my case. If I can not access the font I need I now have to waste hundreds of hours going through all my spreadsheets in order to amend everything which is in Aharoni to something else which I don't really want!! The majorityof my spreadsheets have over 60-70 tabs in them and this "minor change" is actually going to be a "Major work" for me which I could well do without!!

There is an old saying in life - "if it aint broke, don't fix it". Perhaps that should have applied here too....??

I'm having a similar problem. I installed Windows 10 update (version 1511, 10586) and the pan-European supplemental fonts that I had installed were removed. However what's worse is that Pan-European supplemental fonts are no longer an optional feature either, so it's not obvious to me how I can get them back. I certainly hope removal of these fonts was not an intentional part of the upgrade and that they'll be brought back in the next update; they're extremely important! I wish I had had a warning.

Any guidance on getting this font pack back or other information about its removal would be greatly appreciated!!

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