give standard user access to admin program Windows 10 Pro

Ok.  I've been getting really frustrated with this. I've searched tons of sites, tested tons of methods and none work.

The task is a seemingly simple one, conceptually. I, as the administrator, want to give access to a specific user, with standard access, to a specific program.  It should be easy, shouldn't it?

Here's what I tried part 1:

- I gave that user "full privileges" to the program's containing folder.

- Turned OFF/ON/OFF the Compatibility/Change settings for all users/Run this program as an administrator

- I even gave the user ownership of the entire folder.

None of that work. Always getting the irritating admin popup.

Here's what I tried, part 2;

- I tried the trick with the Task Scheduler. Added a task, pointing to the target program. Added a Trigger to launch automatically when selected user logged in.

- That didn't work. So tried another approach using New-EventLog and Triggering the Task from a custom Log entry.  Failed as well.

Here's what I tried, part 3;

- Tried the : runas /user:MachineName\username /savecred Program.exe

- Getting "740: The requested operation requires elevation. "

- Tons of post on the web about this error.

- Tried a few group policy changes and none worked.

So, once again, I just spend an entire evening trying all sorts of different things to allow, as the administrator, 1 @#$%^ program to run on a basic account.  Why is it ALWAYS so @#$%^#$^ complicated to do ANYTHING in Windows nowadays!  This is a simple requirement, which should have a simple solution!!

I run into these issues ALL THE TIME now. So frustrating!! 

So now, I might have to give that user full admin privileges to run 1 freakin program! How secure is THAT!

I'm Greg, an installation specialist and 8 year Windows MVP, here to help you.

It seems you've done everything correctly. It could be system corruption or a bug.

If you want to report this to Microsoft use the Feedback Hub app in Start Menu where developers are tasked to process consumer feedback. But Microsoft will not even see it here because this is a tech forums where we are mostly volunteers trying to help solve your problems.

What I'd do at this point is wait a few days for Spring Creators Update to be released, install Media Creation Tool from this link and choose Upgrade This PC Now: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/m...

This is the most stable way to change to the newer version and because it reinstalls WIndows while keeping your files and programs in place, fixes most problems. It also brings all Windows Updates to date.

I hope this helps. Feel free to ask back any questions and let us know how it goes. I will keep working with you until it's resolved.
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I am a volunteer and not Microsoft.

Over 100,000 helped in forums for 10 years. I don't quit for those who are polite and cooperative.

Windows MVP 2010-20

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Greg,

Thank you for your inputs and sorry for the delay. 

I have seen the same behavior on my son's computer, where he doesn't have admin privileges either. At first, I wondered if it was a result of an app not digitally signed.  But that's not the case. Both apps are signed.

I can't find a pattern.  I do suspect both programs (on the different machines) are somewhat operating at a lower lever than usual. That is, the first program is for the VR wireless headset TPCast.  It needs access to the VR hardware, so I wonder if it's related to that. The second program is RivaTuner, a program used for overclocking and hardware monitoring. I believe it also has direct access to the Graphics card settings.  So both seem related to having direct access to the hardware.

I will continue to Google on that thread, before I send a bug report.

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The task is a seemingly simple one, conceptually. I, as the administrator, want to give access to a specific user, with standard access, to a specific program.  It should be easy, shouldn't it?

Actually, no, it's not a simple task because it attempts to break the security model for operating systems. Let me explain:

A user account that has Administrator permissions can make changes that affect the entire computer. A user account that has Standard (or 'User') permissions can only make changes that affect their own account.

Programs that can make changes that affect the entire computer need to be run from an account with Administrator permissions. A Standard account does not have that ability and you can't give it that ability because that goes against the whole idea of a Standard account.

In order for a Standard user to run a program that needs Administrator permissions, the Standard user needs to right-click on the program's shortcut and select 'Run as Administrator.' The Standard user will then be prompted for the password to an Administrator account. That allows the Standard user to run only that program with Administrator permissions, and only that one time.

But in order to do that, the Standard user has to know the password to an Administrator account. No password, no can do. If it were any simpler every hacker from here to Timbuktu would be on it.

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Just an ordinary guy, with no fancy titles or boasts, who can't get enough of technology.

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BulldogXX,

I understand the security model.  But if you're going to allow a Standard User to run a specific program as Administrator once, by providing the password when prompted, then it should *absolutely* be possible to allow that exact same program to be run all the time, for that specific user, without having to enter the password again (given that the binary file doesn't change).  If, as a user with Administrative access, you have deemed a given program to be safely used by a specific user, a group, or by all users , then there's absolutely no reason the system should stop you from doing so.  Do you think having to give *complete* Administrative Privileges to that user, because he cannot launch one .exe to play a video game, is safer in that security model?  I think not.

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Additionally. If an Administrator can completely disable UAC, uninstall all Anti-Viruses, disable the Firewall; then surely, he should be able to let a program run as Admin.

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Last updated January 21, 2021 Views 13,769 Applies to: