Merging three unallocated partitions into one.

I,due to lack of knowledge,created three separate unallocated partitions by windows 10 disk management.Now can I merge these three into one single drive without inflicting any harm?Please Help?

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Hello,

Thank you for your interest in Windows 10.

As per the issue description you are willing to align all unallocated space to one drive. Correct me if I am wrong. If that is the scenario then you may try he steps provided below and see if it helps.

  • Open the Disk management window.
  • Right click on the first unallocated partition and select the option to create a volume.
  • Follow the on screen instruction to create a volume.
  • After creating volume right click on that and select the option extend volume.
  • Now a new window will pop up from where you can add the other unallocated partition to this newly created volume.

Hope the information provided is helpful. Do let us know if you have any more concern related to Windows. We will be more than happy to assist you.

 

Regards,

Ramesh Kumar.

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Hello,

Thank you for your interest in Windows 10.

As per the issue description you are willing to align all unallocated space to one drive. Correct me if I am wrong. If that is the scenario then you may try he steps provided below and see if it helps.

  • Open the Disk management window.
  • Right click on the first unallocated partition and select the option to create a volume.
  • Follow the on screen instruction to create a volume.
  • After creating volume right click on that and select the option extend volume.
  • Now a new window will pop up from where you can add the other unallocated partition to this newly created volume.

Hope the information provided is helpful. Do let us know if you have any more concern related to Windows. We will be more than happy to assist you.

Regards,

I followed these steps but I do not get the option to extend the volume only to shrink it as the extend option is gray.

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This does not solve my issue because one partition was allocated when I did an image copy to rescue a failing hard drive. Now my data is safe on the new drive, but I can't seem to expand the copied partition to use the whole drive.

I would assume my situation is common for anyone who has to hurriedly replace a failing drive.

Worse, I changed the drive type to dynamic because I misunderstood the documentation on dynamic drives. I assumed changing the drive type would enable expanding the partition, but instead, it has made third-party partitioning software unable to correct the problem. 

SInce I did this, a new problem has come up. Somehow Windows 10 now thinks my computer is part of an organization, and many of my settings are now hidden and unavailable. I keep going to Control-Panel>System> Advanced_System_Settings>Computer_Name>Network_ID> and selecting the option "This is a home computer; it's not part of a business network" which forces an immediate reset of the computer, but each time it resets, this setting is back to "This Computer is part of a business network; I use it to connect to other computers at work"

The fact is, I am disabled and I live at home. I have limited income, and when I must upgrade a computer, I network the old ones. I have several old Linux computers (because old computers work a lot better with Linux) and an XT computer, none of which are compatible with Windows Home networking. I use the Linux computers for all device and file sharing and I avoid using Microsoft networking because Linux-based networking works consistently and isn't affected by Microsoft's ever-changing non-standard ways of doing things. I suspect that's why Windows won't believe I'm using a home computer.

I know the old technology well, but when Windows hides and blocks user settings, and installs unnecessary services to support features I will never use such as "Cortana" (I was using an intelligent assistant for five years before Microsoft came up with this security nightmare imposter that requires opening up lots of extra ports and exposing everyone to increased risk of ID theft. )

Microsoft seems to equate "security" with hiding security threats from users, rather than giving users full access to all settings so they can ensure their own security. Microsoft's backward approach to security threatens the REAL security of my entire home network!

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Last updated May 12, 2021 Views 28,257 Applies to: