Why can't I mark something as spam in windows 10 mail?

I get emails to my box from a certain career website. It didn't bother me for a while, but the last week they literally buried me with an avalanche of email and I missed another email that was actually important.

I go to unsubscribe on one of their emails and surprise, I can't. Clicking unsubscribe takes me to a web page where there's no option to unsubscribe. Instead I get a huge ad where they try to sell me something instead! That's a 'violation' of email practices/etiquette. That makes it spam and an undesirable sender so I won't be dealing with them anymore. Black list them, right?

Okay. So, theoretically I should just be able to right click the message and tag the sender or email as spam. I used to be able to do that anyway in Windows live 2012 mail.

But for some insane, ridiculous reason (most likely, "how can we be more like Apple?"), the windows 10 Mail developers decided to take out the handy "mark as spam"  feature that windows email products have had for over a decade.

 Oh, wait, I'm now supposed to do 4 extra steps (clicks) to move it to my junk folder. Really? And "move to junk", a folder that looks exactly the same as 20 of my other folders (had to spend 10 minutes figuring that out). What exactly does that mean? No. I want to "mark as spam and block sender". I used to have that option. [Plus I want to be able to send code that nukes their harddrive... now THAT would be something.]

Put back the 'mark as spam' right click feature please.

Stop taking useful stuff that we're all used to out for the sake of streamlining. This is an example of Windows 10 design decision over thinking without stopping to ponder why stuff was there in the first place. Stop trying to be Jobs. Be Gates instead.

Thanks.

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I think you are misunderstanding what is happening.

The Windows 10 Mail app is a total rewrite.

As such it could very well be not that they are making any kind of judgement on if feature A or B is useful.

They are simply not able to put all the needed features in, in the current schedule.  New features will surely follow in time.  The same is true of Microsoft Edge and other apps.

In the meantime that is of little comfort for people that need to get their jobs done.

And the best suggestion for that is download and install another email program.

Windows Live 2012 mail is still available.  There are several threads on  here talking about.  Some people have problems, but it seems most people can make it work.

Note I'm just another user trying to help.

Well, I certainly don't know what the design directive is any more at Microsoft. Who are they making this product for now?

 

Microsoft made its mark as software for business - and you know what? That strategy actually worked. Now I see Microsoft ads featuring toddlers saying, "she'll use her smile instead of a password" and "He'll be able to scribble on the Internet" complete with a doodle over the page.

I mean, how far are they trying to dumb this down?

Since I upgraded to Windows 10, I've disabled Cortana (who insists on helping me find OTHER people's stuff instead of my own), stopped using the crashy Edge, where you can't even save a file to a folder you choose. I stopped using Mail whose 'simplified' monotone blue design is so unclear (so it can make room for a super useful picture of the sky) that I can't see what I've read and what I haven't. Plus I can't right click to manage junk. Bing cannot compete with Google. I disabled all the privacy invasion and cloud stuff, removed Gallery (which automatically features every picture I don't need to see)... and the list goes on.

I mean, instead of targeting business enterprises and working to impress the people who run them, Microsoft seems to have decided that a 24 year old stay at home mom with no more than a high school education is target number one?

Nothing against 24 year old stay at home moms, but they're not exactly running an IT department with a thousand plus users.

Well I can see with each upgrade, Windows loses its features and so the trust. There were days when nothing can compete windows... Not anymore.

I too have Windows 10 and it has already taken me 3 days to set it up in an almost functional manner. And setting up is still going. (I dont remember I need to service.msc or group edit policy as soon as I installed Windows to manage very basic things.)

I think you are misunderstanding what is happening.

The Windows 10 Mail app is a total rewrite.

As such it could very well be not that they are making any kind of judgement on if feature A or B is useful.

They are simply not able to put all the needed features in, in the current schedule.  New features will surely follow in time.  The same is true of Microsoft Edge and other apps.


I wonder from when a big enterprise company like Microsoft starts releasing non-functional/ half-functional apps. Being buggy is alot different thing.

Well, I certainly don't know what the design directive is any more at Microsoft. Who are they making this product for now?

I mean, how far are they trying to dumb this down?

... and the list goes on.
Nothing against 24 year old stay at home moms, but they're not exactly running an IT department with a thousand plus users. 

I feel same when things doesn't work out as expected.

For now, the only thing I can see is to manually delete mails or use different mail program. If you use any office suite, Outlook will be preferred choice (it also has calendar and other contact management stuff, which is good to replace functionality of apps). Otherwise, these days browsers have their own mail client.

I, indeed, appreciate the fact QPW_Test admitted that theres a missing functionality and it may (should) be implemented in future releases.

Hello, good morning,

I am just as frustrated as you are to eliminate all the advertising which I did not order and don't want to look at.

If I search something, then this is my decision and not anybody else business.

I am sitting at my computer already for one hour to get rid of all the junk and spam information and I still did not finish what I wanted to do.

I also agree fully with you, that these employees are getting paid to confuse us users. Why? So that they keep their jobs and get paid for it. I totally object!!!

Monika

There are a few simple ways to control spam, one of which is to stop using the simplistic Mail app which was not intended to be a comprehensive email client.  You can use Windows Live Mail or Mozilla Thunderbird, which I've been happily using for years.

The other way is to go to the web interface of your mail provider and use its junk controls.  When you see spam in the Mail app, go to the web interface and mark the offending message as junk.  This way mail from the same sender will be caught at the server and not be seen in the Mail app.

... stop using the simplistic Mail app which was not intended to be a comprehensive email client...

...You can use Windows Live Mail or Mozilla Thunderbird.....

... This way mail from the same sender will be caught at the server and not be seen in the Mail app....

Long story short: Do you intend MS should not improve mail client or like the way it is currently? :D

Long Story:

I don't think any other mail client provides anything extra than what were there in Mail App. It was indeed, intended to be comprehensive mail client. Infact, I never used mail client in Windows until Windows 8 because of its light weight and low effect on bandwidth.

This is where the problem starts. Duplicate software for almost everything is fed into our Windows system. You should consider other Windows devices too where storage is meagre just enough to hold Windows itself.

I guess mail client functionality is not restricted to local system but also to server. If I delete mail from client, it is deleted from server. And so if I select mail as junk, it should also reflect in server. So "This way mail from the same sender will be caught at the server and not be seen in the Mail app" was never true. Atleast, till I used other mail clients and Windows 8... I don't know about Windows 10 though.

Anyways, currently I am ignoring all notifications from Windows 10 mail app. Until mail app matures enough, I will stick to my android for such trivial tasks.

I, indeed, appreciate the fact QPW_Test admitted that theres a missing functionality and it may (should) be implemented in future releases.

I hope everyone here realizes that no one on posting on this thread is from Microsoft, so I'm not sure what you mean about "admitted".  I'm stating an opinion based on what I have seen and what Microsoft has stated.  As in I can see that even in comparison to the Windows 8.1 Mail app some functionality has been dropped.  And Microsoft has said that Windows 10 is going be done as a "Windows as a service" with continued improvements.  There is a Windows Feedback app, and they are listening, because as an Insider (And Insider is just a person that is willing to test pre release builds) I have watched them continually fix and add things.

Now in the overall scheme of things.  I don't think it is reasonable to believe that these "apps" will ever be "full functional" in comparison to the desktop applications.  And I base that on two things.  One is the whole idea that an "app" needs to be "touch friendly", work on small devices, and be "simple".  These goals pretty much restrict how many features you can put in.  A desktop application can put in more functionality in a smaller space simply because you are using a mouse instead of a finger.  There is also a limit to how much people will scroll and switch to other windows and such until they call the program too complicated.  And the other deciding fact is making money.  The full featured products like Outlook, make lots of money and Microsoft is certainly not going to make anything that has all its features for free that directly competes with that.

As for practical workarounds for now, the more I think of it for the problem of spam I have better suggestions than my first suggestion.  Some of which have already been suggested by others.

I suggested a new email client, because that directly addresses the request, but it is actually not the most effective.

I have almost no spam in Outlook.  In fact the few times that I have had spam in Outlook, Outlook is mistaken about it.  And I mark it not as junk.

Why?

It starts with good practices.  How much spam you are going to get is going to be directly related to what kind of things you sign up for with your email address.  A little pre-thought can save a lot of headache later.  Second plan for "risky" email use.  For instance anything to do with a forum is "risky" in my opinion.  The QPW_Test user name is connected to a throw away email address.  As if I ever get too much email I will just dump the email address.  In general I have four main email addresses, personal, business, financial institutions, "the rest/possible spam".  My email client reads the personal and business, and the others are setup to be forwarded to the personal email address.

The second part of this is the quality of the ISP/mail server software.  I have a business support account that clearly I don't what to shutdown for spam, and clearly has to be very public (It is on my website).  Along with my domain account I get email addresses, and they are serviced by Google.  And they do an excellent job of catching the spam.  My regular ISP does an excellent job too even though they don't have much work to do because I have already limited the spam by my practices.  They are servicing the personal accounts.  I use Yahoo mail for the "questionable" ones.  and actually I'm not sure about their filters because I seems I do a pretty good job of not signing up with too many spammers, but I could simply abandon the email addresses I use for this if I needed to.

The point here is that you have to realize that even if you are using a good full functional email client, the first line of defense is always the mail servers, and you control it with their web client.  I have never seen a email client where you can control all the rules and such from just the client.  The spam filtering for the clients is just applied to what the server sends on.  And in a lot of cases it would be better to use the server's web client to tell it about spam, so that their spam filtering can learn from it.

Note I'm just another user trying to help.

you should still be able to mark as spam but you have to log into "outlook" version of email. see screen shot below. not ideal when you have shortcut right to email from your start menu.

Also, clicking unsubscribe may not help you, so many sites use your viewing habits and send you advertisement based off what you search for. many sites have a privacy notice and you can opt out of having your information shared and eliminate use of your personal info for advertising. There is way to download app so that it will prevent sites from collecting/sharing your data. I am still trying one out myself and so far I have had to reset my windows privacy settings every time I log in. you can check out windows privacy info at here, below is from opt out section of notice.

here is portion from opt out page about choices for advertising

What Choices Do I Have About Interest-Based Advertising?

On this page, you can opt out of receiving interest based advertising from Microsoft.

You can also opt out of receiving interest-based advertising from all self-regulatory members, including Microsoft, AOL, AppNexus and other third party ad networks, at the following sites:

In the US: Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA)

In Europe: European Interactive Digital Advertising Alliance (EDAA)

In Canada: Ad Choices: Digital Advertising Alliance of Canada (DAAC)

You can control interest-based advertising in Windows apps by turning off the advertising ID in Windows Settings.

I have found the more times I select to unsubscribe the more emails I get from random email addresses. Funny I don't have this kind of problem with Google just my MSN email that I have had for over 20yrs..

Also, don't forget to check your internet settings. Make sure you have do not track set correctly, this can be found under advanced settings in windows edge

and update your cookie settings as well while your are there

not perfect solutions but it helps..

PS- I am a windows user not employee of Microsoft

well I see a portion is not showing even after I went in to edit again: so hopefully copying the opt out section here works. just in case attaching screen shot :-)

you can view or edit your personal data online for many Microsoft services. You can also make choices about Microsoft's collection and use of your data. How you can access or control your personal data will depend on which services you use.

You can always choose whether you wish to receive promotional email, SMS messages, telephone calls and postal mail from Microsoft. You can also opt out from receiving interest-based advertising from Microsoft by visiting our opt-out page.

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Last updated September 20, 2020 Views 42,296 Applies to: