Windows Core OS - an open-source operating system platform to beat AOSP.

As you know, Windows 10 is a "service", meaning that it is a version that will evolve overtime non-stop. It will receive feature updates semi-annually. Mainstream Support ends on 2020, while Extended Support ends on 2025.

So we need a new version of Windows that will remain supported forever. And the first one to be "open-source".

Recently, Microsoft has begun developing a next-generation Windows Platform, namely "Windows Core OS". This platform is like the Android Open-Source Project, which is the "bare-bones" for a proprietary Android operating system. Like the AOSP, Windows Core OS will not include any proprietary binary-blobs or software. Without those, the platform can be open-source.

Just to let you know, Windows Core OS is not for everyday users. It is for device manufacturers and developers to build custom Windows operating systems for their devices. This platform is "modular", meaning that a version of Windows can be tailored to a device's needs. To make a proprietary Windows operating system, you would have to inject proprietary binary-blobs and software into the source code.

Microsoft can still make proprietary editions of Windows, based on Windows Core OS. The "Home" edition could be proprietary freeware, while the "Pro" edition will be commercial software. The "Enterprise" edition will be subscription-based, and will be sold at volume licensing as usual.

With Microsoft's first open-source Windows platform, it could certainly beat AOSP, and could see device manufacturers give up Android on their devices.

 

Discussion Info


Last updated September 18, 2019 Views 14,960 Applies to:
From the perspective of a hardware manufacturer, if I already provide software support for Linux (and thus Android), why would I want to expend the effort to also support Windows Core?

If I want to support devices that can run Microsoft Office, or Windows games, then this makes sense. This is the traditional Windows/PC market. Outside the Windows/PC market, there is not the slightest chance this will seriously compete with Android or Linux. 

For Microsoft to do an open-source core is a reasonable step. The odds of displacing Linux at this late date is slim.


Wow. 

Very cool.

So is this just a wisher's dream?

Or is this something the Powers That Be at Microsoft corporate is actually considering or actively developing.

Because at this point in time they appear to be blind to the current state of affairs in Windows land.

From the perspective of a hardware manufacturer, if I already provide software support for Linux (and thus Android), why would I want to expend the effort to also support Windows Core?

If I want to support devices that can run Microsoft Office, or Windows games, then this makes sense. This is the traditional Windows/PC market. Outside the Windows/PC market, there is not the slightest chance this will seriously compete with Android or Linux. 

For Microsoft to do an open-source core is a reasonable step. The odds of displacing Linux at this late date is slim.


Preston,

Your premise is very narrow minded if you think about it. Microsoft's Core OS is more than a conduit to Office Suite, but rather an alternative that would enable existing Microsoft development shops to enter a market dominated by AOSP. It is more about competition and less about increasing market shares for MS Office. To suggest otherwise demonstrates an egregious lack of confidence in the Microsoft developer community.

So is this just a wisher's dream?

Or is this something the Powers That Be at Microsoft corporate is actually considering or actively developing.

Because at this point in time they appear to be blind to the current state of affairs in Windows land.

Q-U-I-G-M-O,

I agree with you whole heartedly.  Microsoft needs to stop testing the waters and just jump in.  What they did with their Windows Mobile OS stands as a testimony to their wish washy attitude and lack of respect for their customer's investments into their platforms. 

Depends on how Microsoft addressing this issue (if they even adopt this kind of approach, i.e. open sourcing WCOS bare bones). Imagine this tiers:

  • WCOS - Open sourced core
  • WCOS + Proprietary services (like access to store, etc) - freeware for OEM
  • WCOS + Proprietary services + support for x86 (non-native and what not) - paid version for OEM
  • WCOS + Proprietary services + support for x86 + enterprise environment administration tools - for enterprise workstation (well... this might in fact quite enticing knowing that Windows is highly susceptible against viruses, and closed garden are less likely infected by viruses).

As for Pro or advance usage, Windows 10 is still the way to go. Heck, even if Google already have Android and Chrome OS, they still using Linux as their development rigs. So in Microsoft realms, Windows 10 is here to stay.

I do get your concern regarding OEM though. Depending on how Microsoft addressing consumer device issue (i.e. app gap), OEM might or might not jump into this bandwagon.

*to be or not to be*

Como saben, Windows 10 es un "servicio", lo que significa que es una versión que evolucionará sin parar. Recibirá actualizaciones de funciones semestralmente. El soporte principal finaliza en 2020, mientras que el soporte extendido finaliza en 2025.

Entonces, necesitamos una nueva versión de Windows que siga siendo compatible por siempre. Y el primero en ser "de código abierto".

Recientemente, Microsoft comenzó a desarrollar una plataforma Windows de próxima generación, llamada "Windows Core OS". Esta plataforma es como el Proyecto de código abierto de Android, que es el "bare-bones" para un sistema operativo propietario de Android. Al igual que el AOSP, Windows Core OS no incluirá ningún binario-blobs patentado o software. Sin ellos, la plataforma puede ser de código abierto.

Solo para hacerte saber, Windows Core OS no es para usuarios cotidianos. Los fabricantes y desarrolladores de dispositivos deben crear sistemas operativos Windows personalizados para sus dispositivos. Esta plataforma es "modular", lo que significa que una versión de Windows se puede adaptar a las necesidades de un dispositivo. Para crear un sistema operativo Windows propietario, debería inyectar código binario y software propios en el código fuente.

Microsoft todavía puede hacer ediciones propietarias de Windows, basadas en Windows Core OS. La edición "Home" podría ser un software gratuito patentado, mientras que la edición "Pro" será un software comercial. La edición "Enterprise" estará basada en suscripción y se venderá en licencia por volumen como de costumbre.

Con la primera plataforma de Windows de código abierto de Microsoft, sin duda podría vencer a AOSP, y podría ver a los fabricantes de dispositivos renunciar a Android en sus dispositivos.

Esto alcanzaría también a la población mundial