Possible issue with KB4566782, wherein it breaks Automatic driver update in Device Manager

Hi, I would like to report a potential bug/issue with August 11, 2020—KB4566782 (OS Build 19041.450)

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4566782/windows-10-update-kb4566782

 I'm using Windows 10 build 2004.

Installing this update kb4566782" caused "Automatic driver update" functionality in device manager mmc plug-in to break. 

Describing the problem behavior after kb4566782 is installed:

Within device manager , either in computer management or standalone devmgmt.msc, select any device - right click - update driver - search automatically for drivers - the wizard DOES NOT go to "Searching online for drivers..." stage and comes back with the status "You are already using the best driver..." within 1 second.

I used procmon/process explorer to compare this behavior to 2 known working instances : 

A July07, image from same machine, and another machine running build 1909; And in both these cases, mmc.exe hosting device manager is showing making calls through wininet.dll to discover proxy, IE zones and finally going out to the network.

While in broken instance, no calls to wininet.dll are made. Process explorer confirms that wininet.dll is NOT loaded on device manager launch on the broken instance, while it is in both working instances. I uninstalled/reinstalled the kb4566782 twice to confirm, and was able to reproduce the issue. 

Note: this behavior is exhibited only within device manager, other apps/processes continue to load wininet.dll as expected. 

Additional finding: Attempting to repair through DISM or sfc commands does not work.

The only recoruse is to either uninstall the update, or to revert to an earlier image. 

As well as in some cases, device manager might disappear altogether from computer management after kb4566782, though standalone devmgmt.msc still loads the mmc console. But the above issue with driver update is still exhibited. 

Steps to repro: 
Install kb4566782 on Windows 10 Build 2004

Launch device manager mmc

Locate the mmc.exe instance for devmgmt.msc, it should be a child process of runtimebroker.exe

User process explorer to check if wininet.dll is loaded inside this mmc.exe instance

Attempt to perform an automatic driver update for any device, and verify if it goes to "Searching online...." stage or not 

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Answer
Answer
Hi RS. I'm Greg, an installation specialist, 10 years awarded Windows MVP, and Volunteer Moderator, here to help you.

1) If you want to report this to Microsoft use the Feedback Hub app in Start Menu where developers are tasked to process consumer feedback. They will not even see it here. This is a tech forums staffed mostly by volunteers trying to help others with your problems.

If you want to post back a Share link from your Feedback here others who see this thread can vote it up and add to it.

2) See if you can System Restore to a point before the problem began following this guide: https://www.windowscentral.com/how-use-system-r...

System Restore is your first line of defense and can take you back to a point before a problem began. If it doesn't help then you can undo it. Read about it first in the tutorial above and then try restoring to just before this started.

If the problem repeats or System Restore doesn't work then check which Windows Updates were installed at Settings > Update & Security > Windows Updates > Update History, uninstall them there or System Restore again, then immediately check for and block the Updates with the Hide Updates tool explained here: https://www.howtogeek.com/223864/how-to-uninsta...

3) If this was caused by a Version Update then for 10 days you can roll it back in Settings>Update & Security>Recovery and then hide it until it matures using the Hide Updates Tool which is explained more here:
https://www.howtogeek.com/223864/how-to-uninsta....

If that doesn't work you can also Go Back in Repair Mode as shown here:
https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/2294-advanc...

4) Update your drivers and BIOS/UEFI firmware from PC or motherboard maker's Support Downloads web page, using the full model number, Serial Number or Dell Service Tag on sticker. Compare the latest drivers available for download with the ones presently installed in Device Manager reached by right clicking the Start button. Make sure you have the latest Chipset, Display (Video), Sound, USB3, Bluetooth, Network and all other drivers, or else download and install the latest now.

Then type System Information in Start Search, compare the latest BIOS/UEFI firmware version with the one showing in System Information, and install it following closely the instructions on the download page, and on any Read Me file included in download.

Updating drivers from the Device Manager or Windows Update is rarely enough. The most basic thing we need to learn to maintain a PC is keep the latest manufacturer's drivers installed from their Support Downloads web page.

5) Go over this checklist to make sure the install is set up correctly, optimized for best performance, and any needed repairs get done: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wiki...

Start with Step 4 to turn off Startup freeloaders which can conflict and cause issues, then Step 7 to check for infection the most thorough way, then step 10 to check for damaged System Files, and also Step 16 to test a new Local Admin account. Then if necessary continue with the other steps to go over your install most thoroughly.

6) If nothing else works then do a Repair Install, by installing Media Creation Tool, open tool and choose to Upgrade Now. This reinstalls Windows while keeping files, programs and most settings in place, is the most stable method to advance to the latest version, and solves most problems. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/m...

I hope this helps. Feel free to ask back any questions and keep me posted. If you'll wait to rate whether my post resolved your problem, I will keep working with you until it's resolved.

______________________________________________
Standard Disclaimer: There are links to non-Microsoft websites. The pages appear to be providing accurate, safe information. Watch out for ads on the sites that may advertise products frequently classified as a PUP (Potentially Unwanted Products). Thoroughly research any product advertised on the sites before you decide to download and install it.
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Millions helped via my tutorials and personally in forums for 12 years. Now an Independent Advisor.

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Last updated May 8, 2021 Views 478 Applies to: