Discussion: How to create a system restore point and restore your system from it?

Hi there!

Windows has a lot of advanced recovery tools, which help to recover your OS after some crash or unexpected behavior.

A system restore point is one of those. It helps you recover your system to the date you recorded the point.

I'll be using Windows 11, but this method will work on Windows 8./8.1/10 too.

First of all, boot into Windows.

It's a good practice to create restore points on weekly or monthly basis.

To do it:

  1. In the search bar, type System restore point. Open the app.

  2. Then click on Configure.

  3. Click on Turn on system protection

  4. If you have a large hard disk/SSD size, select about 5 to 10%. I recommend to keep it around 2 to 3%.

  5. Click on Apply > OK.

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Now let's create a system restore point!

  1. Select your Windows drive and click on Create.

  2. Name the system restore point, so that while restoring, you can understand what it is. Then click on Create.

  3. This will create the system restore point. Depending on how many apps, programs and files you have in the C: drive, it might take a while.

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How to restore from the restore point when you are able to use Windows?

It's not that hard as expected.

Open the system restore application.

  1. Click on System Restore.

  2. Windows will automatically select the recommended restore point.

  3. If you want to use some other point, select Choose a different restore point.

  4. Click on Next. Now it will show you a list of all restore points recorded on the system. Select the one you want and click on Next.

  5. Finally, click on Finish and it will start restoring from that point.

  6. When done, it will automatically restart your system and began restoring.

  7. And done!

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How to restore from the system restore point when you're unable to use Windows?

This is easy too.

  1. Turn off your PC completely.

  2. Turn it on.

  3. When you see the spinning dots, immediately press and hold the power button for 5 seconds. This will hard shut down.

  4. Do this more 2 times. On the third time, you will see a blue or black screen. Or, you will see a message saying Preparing Automatic repair. Wait till you see a blue or black screen.

  5. Then, press F8 to enter Startup settings.

  6. Then press F4. This will enter safe mode.

  7. In the safe mode, click on the start menu. Then click on Power.

  8. Hold down Shift and click on Restart.

  9. You'll again see a blue/black screen.

  10. Click on Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > System restore.

  11. You will be shown a Vista-style window. Just click on next.

  12. The steps after this are the same as above (restoring when you're able to use Windows)

  13. All you have to do is just wait until it finishes.

Thanks,

Ishaan

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A system restore point is one of those. It helps you recover your system to the date you recorded the point.

Actually, that is not correct. Only an image can restore a computer to the way it was on the day (and at the time) the image was made.

A restore point is a collection of critical Windows components (system files, system drivers and registry hives) whose goal is to restore enough of the essential functioning of Windows to enable a user to solve a problem that prevents Windows from working properly. An image is an exact copy of a hard drive at a point in time. When you restore an image, the computer goes back in time to exactly the way it was at the moment the image was made.

Restore points have a limited useful life after which they are erased by the system. In addition, all existing restore points are erased after a major upgrade to Windows, like a feature upgrade. But an image exists for as long as you wish it to exist.

In view of the wide variety of consumer-friendly image programs available today, system restore has limited usefulness. Users will be much better served by adopting the habit of regular image backups.

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"I'm a naughty Rottie."

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I know

It cannot be used if Windows is wiped out.

I said it can be useful when you have a corrupted system or you want to go back a few days before.

But thanks!

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I said it can be useful when you have a corrupted system or you want to go back a few days before.

A restore point cannot do this ("go back a few days before.") It can restore large portions of Windows to the state they were in (the 'system state') when the restore point was made. The remainder of Windows, and all applications and personal files are unaffected by a restore point.

By contrast, an image has two advantages:

1- you know the exact point in time to which the computer will be restored; and

2- the entire computer will be restored to the same point in time, which avoids the possible problems of having portions of the computer set to different dates.

-------------------------
"I'm a naughty Rottie."

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Hi there!

Windows has a lot of advanced recovery tools, which help to recover your OS after some crash or unexpected behavior.

A system restore point is one of those. It helps you recover your system to the date you recorded the point.

You can create these points when updating/upgrading Windows, installing some other OS (dual booting), changing anything with the registry, etc.

Today, I'm going to guide you, how to create a system restore point, and restore your system from it when it's damaged or corrupted.

I'll be using Windows 11, but this method will work on Windows 8./8.1/10 too.

First of all, boot into Windows.

It's a good practice to create restore points on weekly or monthly basis.

To do it:

  1. In the search bar, type System restore point. Open the app.

    Image

FYI:

This is wrong that you wrote and there is no use saying you know; if you knew you would not have posted this:

You can create these points when updating/upgrading Windows, installing some other OS (dual booting), changing anything with the registry, etc.

If you upgrade an operating system you have a new operating system so there will be no system restore points left as there will be no system settings to go back to.

That is why Microsoft creates a process to revert within so many days, or you create a system image backup of the old operating system.

It's a good practice to create restore points on weekly or monthly basis.

Windows automatically does that on a weekly basis; besides creating restore points for other events.

I will leave you to do some research and find the other events!

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Bill Smithers - Microsoft MVP July 2013 - Dec 2020

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If you upgrade an operating system you have a new operating system so there will be no system restore points left as there will be no system settings to go back to.

1. By upgrading I mean installing a new build (like upgrading from 20H2 to 21H1, etc.)

Windows automatically does that on a weekly basis; besides creating restore points for other events.

2. On some PCs, I have seen it disabled by default, so I added it.

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If you upgrade an operating system you have a new operating system so there will be no system restore points left as there will be no system settings to go back to.

1. By upgrading I mean installing a new build (like upgrading from 20H2 to 21H1, etc.)

Windows automatically does that on a weekly basis; besides creating restore points for other events.

2. On some PCs, I have seen it disabled by default, so I added it.

Wrong.

1. You are not authorized to write articles for other users to read and rely on for correct information.

2. I'll be using Windows 11, but this method will work on Windows 8./8.1/10 too.

Go and upgrade 8 > 8.1 and tell me that you have your Restore Point you made still there.

Everything has been referred to Forum Management

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Bill Smithers - Microsoft MVP July 2013 - Dec 2020

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Last updated April 9, 2022 Views 3,006 Applies to: