Desktopini created instead of a folder renaming

Every time I try to rename a folder on my PC (Windows 10 Pro), instead of renaming the file, it creates a desktop.ini folder, and inside of it is the following information

[.ShellClassInfo]
LocalizedResourceName=

After LocalizedResourceName= is the name of the folder that I renamed it to. So if it was Folder1 and I rename it to Folder2, that file will say:

[.ShellClassInfo]
LocalizedResourceName=Folder2

... but the actual foldername will still be Folder1

Searching the Internet lists a bunch of random suggestions, none of which work.  Anyone know why this happens?  I'm pretty close to abandoning File Explorer, as it seems to be the cause of this issue.

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Hi,

Desktop.ini folder/file is a required system file. This type of system file will be recreated automatically so you can leave it on your desktop or File Explorer. This is also set to "Hidden". You may follow these steps and check if you encounter the same difficulty in renaming your files:

  1. Type File Explorer Options on your Windows Search.
  2. Click the View tab.
  3. Under Hidden files and folders, make sure that Don't show hidden files, folders, or drives is selected.
  4. Ensure that Hide protected operating system files is checked.

If you need additional assistance, do not hesitate to reply.

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Definitely not the solution; that's what I had to do to diagnose the problem (the reverse of that).  And desktop.ini files are DEFINITELY not required system files; this is evidenced by the fact that, if I delete them, my system works as designed.  I'd consider them as more of a virus than anything; polluting my file system and fooling ONLY File Explorer.

Many people might think that your File Manager lying about whether you renamed a folder is not an issue, except I work on this PC, and I give files to vendors who have very specific rules about folder structure and useless files.  If I have a folder called "Originals - engineering print screwed up" and rename it to "Complete" ... they will get the folder @ their end still called "Originals - engineering print screwed up", and there will be a visible desktop.ini file @ their end.  As well, I pretty extensively use VB/VBA apps, and much like every piece of software other than File Explorer, they don't recognize the fake renaming that desktop.ini enables.

I am looking for a solution that actually fixes the problem (forces File Explorer to actually rename folders); was not an issue in previous versions of Windows file managers.  I was even having this problem with a previous Windows 10 installation; I reinstalled Windows recently, and the issue is back.

Edit: I wonder if this has anything to do with File Indexing and file searches being defaulted to that useless Content mode? The folders generally contain .DXF, .DWG, .7z, .XLS,M,X... , .ZIP, .PDF

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We appreciate the details you shared. This may continue to happen due to a system file corruption. For us to make sure that you're not in the same situation, we suggest running the System File Checker. This tool will allow you to scan and diagnose any corrupted files in your system and enhance its performance. Check this article: Use the System File Checker tool to repair missing or corrupted system files for the procedures.

If you need more help, do not hesitate to reply.

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I ran this checking tool, and it reported "Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations."

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Hi,

Are you still having the same concern? If yes, may we ask if you have installed any software applications or changed any hardware device on your device recently?

Regards.

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I had this problem previously on an Intel 4770k computer.  This motherboard died, and I replaced it with a new Ryzen system, and felt a format was in order.  The issue persisted after a format, and completely different hardware. As such, every single piece of software I have installed is "new", and was the same software used in Windows 7.

This issue showed up when I had originally upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10; no software changed, just the upgrade.  With a "clean" install of Windows 10, the issue still persists.

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If the solution did not work for you. We suggest to run the Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT). This helps remove malicious software from computers. Kindly click on the article below to run the tool.

Remove specific prevalent malware with Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool

After running MSRT suggest you also run the Microsoft Safety Scanner. It is a free downloadable security tool that provides on-demand scanning and helps remove viruses, spyware, and other malicious software. It works with your existing antivirus software. Kindly click on the article below to run the tool.

Microsoft Safety Scanner

For any concerns. don't hesitate to get back to us.

Regards.

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Malicious Software Removal Tool - no problems (Full scan)

Microsoft Safety Scanner - no problem (Full scan)

I wonder if it has anything to do with renaming things from the File Explorer search window?  I'll pretty often search for "Reference" and rename them to "Ref" from the File Explorer search.

This is a whole lot of beating around the bush; does anyone know if I can ensure File Explorer actually renames a file when it is told to?  Is there a way to disable it's ability to fake-rename a file? This was a "feature" that could apparently be disabled in Win 7, and earlier builds of Win 10:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer]
"UseDesktopIniCache"=dword:00000000

... but not anymore.  It's obviously a built-in feature for some reason, so is there a registry setting I can add that makes it so it can't do it?  It's not some rogue software that is intercepting file renames and creating a desktop.ini file that, conveniently, only File Explorer recognizes; why would anything do that?

I'd even settle with File Explorer simply not renaming the file if it can't do it.

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Do you have the latest updates? We suggest to update Windows. Generally speaking, updated systems deliver better functionality and improved performance. For the most part, you certainly want to upgrade your drivers unless you have a very specific reason for not wanting to do so.

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All drivers are updated to the newest possible.  As well, none of the drivers related to this issue (harddrives) are common to the drivers that were used in my previous system with the same issue.

Windows is fully updated.  In fact, I don't believe it is possible to not have my system updated unless I disconnect it from the Internet.

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Last updated August 9, 2020 Views 846 Applies to: