Windows Defender. > Windows Security > Web Protection. = NONE!

A couple days ago I switched from McAfee LiveSafe to Norton Antivirus Plus.

I just now (can't remember why) opened Windows Defender. In the Windows Security Section, it does list Norton for a few things currently being covered. However, in the middle of that list, it reads Web Protection, NONE. Meaning there is no web protection.

How can Norton Antivirus Plus cover my device, through the internet yet it says I have NO WEB PROTECTION? Is that a mistake or do I have web protection? Can't get a hold of Norton because of this stupid Covid-19 crapola!

Thanks,

Barry

Answer
Answer

That Web protection item in Windows Security Center is actually designed for Microsoft Defender ATP, which is the commercial product for larger businesses, though it's possible some 3rd-party products may provide similar products with the specific Web threat protection and content filtering capabilities that this provides.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/microsoft-defender-atp/web-protection-overview

In fact, if you didn't have Norton installed and were instead using the built-in Windows Defender security product, you'd still notice that this Web protection item would indicate NONE, since it doesn't contain these specific added features either.

What Microsoft provides to do portions of this with Windows 10 itself is the SmartScreen filtering product, which is embedded both within the Microsoft Edge browser as well as Windows.

With SmartScreen, you get basically the same features Windows Defender ATP provides within Web Threat Protection as follows; "Stop access to phishing sites, malware vectors, exploit sites, untrusted or low-reputation sites, as well as sites that you have blocked."

However, SmartScreen doesn't provide the Web Content Filtering portion of Windows Defender ATP described as; "Track and regulate access to websites based on their content categories.", though I believe the Family Safety add-on ability which still exists for Windows 10 supports a limited version of this capability.

What you're really seeing here are the typically confusing set of minor differences between commercial and consumer versions of Windows and the security features these support, resulting in apparent anomalies that actually don't mean anything.  In other words, you're getting caught up in the trap of taking everything in Windows literally, which due to the speed at which Windows 10 is being updated and modified on its way to a much different future, is often leading to temporary anomalies like this one.

Moral of the story?  Web protection in the scope of consumer versions of Windows 10 really means nothing, so just ignore it.

Rob

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Last updated October 18, 2020 Views 233 Applies to: