Why doesn't Microsoft Improve MSE Performance

As I ve been using MSE since V2, one of the negative features that I ve been experiencing is MSE's slowing down Windows Explorer.
This issue causes slowness especially when openning folders with lots of setup files....the icons will be shown with a delay.

Disabling Realtime Protection will repair the slowness,Installing other light AVs will also come to the solution.

Microsoft claims that their AV is fast and compatible but this issue has never been fixed among the versions.

I ve seen lots of complaints about that and surprisingly the answers were far from reality .there were tips recommended to speed up system such as Defragmentation, and so on ,but the system is not the cause....My system is  a AMD Quadcore with 6gb ram and an original windows....No interfering program is installed.....it is working well without MSE,,It s working well with other AV,It s working well with MSE(and excluding Win Explorer from MSE monitoring)....I ve seen this problem on a Corei5 system....I m sure lots of people have the same problem and I can give you lots of links regarding that.

Some say maybe it lacks technologies like fingerprinting or whitelisting, which third party AVs use to manage resources better.

So please....MS Experts....I know you are best in anything concerning WINDOWS....please fix the issue



Thanks in advance
 

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Last updated May 16, 2018 Views 356 Applies to:

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Performance of the antimalware engine is constantly under review. Note that MSE is actually the interface, but the real time protection components are shared with Forefront and Defender.

I agree that we've seen a number of reports of the slowness you are describing, but millions of others, myself included, have never experienced this behavior.

-steve

^_^
Windows Insider MVP (Security), Moderator Microsoft Community
As I ve said,I ve seen lots of system with Intel or AMD processor and they all have the issue.
Whenever I ask about the issue on every forum I got the same result about others having this slowness.

Post#705
http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=322765&page=29

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1541342

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1541342



Have you ever opened a folder containing lots of setup files?!!
What windows are you using?(I m talking about Win7)

Does anyone else have any idea?

I think it s better to have a survey about it and I think lots of people will come complaining about the problem

Yeah sure, a survey will let every clueless person out there moan about the problem and as with all surveys do nothing else, because surveys are just another form of likes, or voting, which resolve nothing.


The "problem" here is the storing of many executable installers in a single folder, since this isn't a normal situation for a typical PC and only occurs when people "collect" software, which is a small subset of the population.  However, since these people tend to frequent the same few forums and "techie" sites, they have the distorted belief that everyone else is like them, since everyone they hang around with is.


Actually this population is a minority of maybe 10 to 15% if that many, but then most of the regular PC user population doesn't frequent forums of any sort, only Facebook, Amazon or similar social and selling sites and they don't collect software, they install and use it.


So now to the key question, why does this delay occur?  Quite simply because when a folder is accessed MSE performs an initial quick inventory of the files in the folder and then it targets executables of any sort to perform a pre-execution emulation test on these files.  This way once a file is actually clicked by the user it has already been tested and doesn't cause a delay at that moment.  Unfortunately, when a pathologically large number of executable files exist in a folder, this results in exactly the opposite problem of a delay when opening it.


So though this could potentially be resolved by removing this ability, it's not likely to occur since a far greater number of people are aided by this pre-scan than are affected negatively without it, most likely including those with the problem since they also avoid the delays when using normal application folders.  Only when these storage folders are accessed do the significant delays occur.


Rob

As I ve said,I ve seen lots of system with Intel or AMD processor and they all have the issue.
Whenever I ask about the issue on every forum I got the same result about others having this slowness.

Post#705
http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=322765&page=29

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1541342

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1541342



Have you ever opened a folder containing lots of setup files?!!
What windows are you using?(I m talking about Win7)

Does anyone else have any idea?

I think it s better to have a survey about it and I think lots of people will come complaining about the problem


I am aware that many report the issue and have done so for quite some time.

Setup files are an interesting file type -- they contain instructions that may point to other locations, but usually they point to the nested compressed files within the package. I can't tell you that it is the most efficient method, but the Microsoft Antimalware scan will follow the paths and loads the file(s) into memory to scan them.

The other twist that people have reported is a delay introduced by MSE when opening a folder containing shortcuts to exe files, often on a mapped drive or Server Share location. The scan apparently follows the shortcut to the source and again, checks each target for infection.


I have used MSE on XP, Vista, and Windows 7 and also use Defender on Windows 8 and Win/RT. I've never encountered the issue personally, but I don't typically save setup files and I don't map drives.


-steve

^_^
Windows Insider MVP (Security), Moderator Microsoft Community
I have used several antivirus on different different pcs.. Among them MSE was very light weight.. 

you can check the resource allocation (CPU/MEMORY?DISK/NETWORK) currently occupied by mse by using resource monitor



H.A.V. Aravinda
First of all Thanks for the replies

I dont think gathering setup files in one folder is abnormal.....when you have a laptop you will categorise your files ...... pictures,movies,ducuments etc....you will put the same files in one folder in order to access them whenever you want....gathering setup files is no exception....you may buy new laptop or you may reinstal your windows and you should have the setup to install them immediately...

the problem is that this issue only happens with MSE....I dont know what other AV do about it but they have done the job well....this issue directly influences system performance.

KOCH said there are 15% of users gathering setup files(which I think there are more)....lets think he s right....is that litlle....Vendors should care about all of their custumers.....what should these users do?!!! should they go to other third party AVs because MS does not want to fix the problem....

MSE's slowing down windows explorer does not cause just that problem...It can make copy/pasting slower and this may be the cause of MSE's poor performance in lavest AV-Comparatives:

www.av-comparatives.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/avc_per_201304_en.pdf

www.av-comparatives.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/avc_per_201311_en.pdf
I too like MSE, but the slowdown described above is a real drawback to me.
Combined with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware, it makes a great combo.

Now, should MSE do those pre-scans on folder's files?
Why not scan only when copying and executing?

Best regards, and thanks for your attention to try to solve this issue.

And Merry Christmas, by the way!
:)


Ce message provient du Québec!
I too like MSE, but the slowdown described above is a real drawback to me.
Combined with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware, it makes a great combo.

Now, should MSE do those pre-scans on folder's files?
Why not scan only when copying and executing?

Best regards, and thanks for your attention to try to solve this issue.

And Merry Christmas, by the way!
:)



Yes...it can be one of the ways to improve the perfoemance.....I m not sure but I think some AVs scan the files on openning the folders(as my older Avira caught the malwares(setup types) before I clicked on them)but there were no such delay(maybe there was a delay but not as much as MSE)

Merry Christmas
Yes...it can be one of the ways to improve the perfoemance.....I m not sure but I think some AVs scan the files on openning the folders(as my older Avira caught the malwares(setup types) before I clicked on them)but there were no such delay(maybe there was a delay but not as much as MSE)

Merry Christmas

A simple change as adding an option for this behaviour would be simple to implement in MSE.
(regular behaviour vs scan only when copying/executing/creating files)

We could very easily see the results.

An "expert" mode in MSE with more granularity in the options would be very welcome, as far as I'm concerned.

Ce message provient du Québec!

And as usual you've walked right into the main reason Microsoft hasn't and won't ever add such a mode, since MSE was specifically designed for the non-expert users who also don't collect software.


The typical user has a few programs he has installed and uses regularly.  He may have even quite a few more that he has added over time, but uses only rarely if at all and if he had looked carefully or chosen better, probably could replace with a few better programs or even something included in Windows itself.


The other truth is that most software today is downloaded from the Internet and if it's worth having is updated regularly for either feature or security improvements.  So with most software, downloading what you need after a rebuild is really more effective unless you're stuck on dial-up or are rebuilding way too often.


The main point here is that MSE was originally built for the typical user of Windows who often didn't even keep their AV up to date, sometimes because they weren't even aware that the "free" AV installed by the PC manufacturer required annual payment to keep definitions current.


So this and the similar small home business user have always been the focus of MSE and thus it is designed and tuned for them.  Since attempts to add "expert" modes to security software always fail, as the self-appointed "experts" always drive unknowing novices to use them, often incorrectly, this supposed solution is a non-starter.


MSE was created by Microsoft to serve an often ignored group of non-technical users who just want the security software to work and don't want to wade through dozens of menus to control it.  Since this same group of people rarely does the sorts of things that programmers and techie users do, MSE may not be suitable for these other groups.  Microsoft have always stated that this is the case and never intended to provide the security software that will work best for everyone, just a very large proportion.


Unfortunately all of the other 3rd-party security products that were once designed this way have eventually succumbed to "feature creep", by adding more and more requested features until their programs became bloated and complex.  Microsoft has not only avoided this tendency by retaining a relatively small set of menus, it has in fact even removed one set of sub-menus during an earlier major beta revision, resulting in less feature controls for a complex set of items that most users frequently misused and so resulted in reduced security and the increased risk of malware infection.


Rob

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