winfix.co and logyou.net scam call from USA to UK on 20th Aug 2016

Dear all,

Please read below my experience of a very convincing scam call trying to gain access to my PC.  Has anyone else been almost convinced like I have ?

This morning I have been receiving calls from Indian accent call centre operators (one was called David and the other two were both called Steven Brown, claiming his email address was *** Email address is removed for privacy ***.

They called with a very convincing argument my computer had been hacked by Pakistan hackers, after asking me to run eventvwr, netstat, msinfo32 and assoc from the cmd box.

The initial convincing part for me was that they were able to read out my CLSID from the cmd then assoc action - then read out my CLSID, claiming it was only the call centre and myself that would know this CLSID number.

Another convincing part from my part (not too technical) on the netstat data were the IP addresses used for internet access.

They asked me to go to support.microsoft.com/help page to read confirmation that it is a free service provided by Microsoft they are trying to help me remove all the viruses by taking full control.  To do this, I had to then go to "winfix.co" and click "server2".

After I asked them to confirm why they are not giving me a support.microsoft.com/help 6-digit support code, they said the way for this free support was through the winfix.co site.  They also asked me to go to logyou.net website.

Fortunately, I was able to quickly research these sites whilst on the phone, which raised suspicion.

The next stage of the call after I was not keen to go to these websites

** BEWARE **  This SCAM call was very convincing, and I was left feeling stupid for not taking them up on their free offer to save my PC from being further infected.

** PRESSURE **  After I said I was not keen on doing and of this, they said that my PC would be blocked by Microsoft for ever due to my PC having virus issues affecting the Microsoft master server.  

My response was that I said I would buy a new PC.

The response back was that they said I would never be able to use a Microsoft product again and would have to buy an Apple PC or something other than Microsoft.

My response was that I would use a neighbours PC.

The response back was that that is my free choice to spend my money freely to live this way, and that the support team have spent a lot of time offering free support and they needed me to confirm I did not want this support.  Also that within 1 hour, my computer would be blocked, and my screen would go blank and the computer would not be able to be used!

Hopefully this will not happen, but it was a very convincing call.

It seems obvious from the support.microsoft.com/help page that you need a 6-digit code for Microsoft to access your computer remotely, but after this scam call, some feedback to Microsoft would be that the help page could be clearer that this is the ONLY WAY Microsoft would access a customer's PC remotely.

Thanks for reading and I hope this is of help to all non-super-users of PCs and Laptops!

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Original title: CLSID SCAM call USA to UK 20th Aug 2016

Was called this morning from by 3 Indian accent call centre operators claiming to be from Microsoft Support Centre offering free support to help save my PC from infections.

The convincing part was when they asked me to look for the CLSID through cmd assoc.

They claimed this was the ID of my PC, but for almost all PCs and laptops!

This CLSID is NOT the ID of the device but infact a standard ID on almost every windows PC!

The call went on to convince me to go to a secure website where they could take control of the PC.

DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT go to any of their sites.  I strung them along to find out all their 'sales' technique until the very end and told them I was not sure and would take the risk of the PC shutting down forever.

They then hung up, hopefully I won't receive any more calls.  However, if I do, I'll be prepared now and confident that this is a 100% SCAM.

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First question you should ask yourself with any unsolicited phone call is "Why would [name of company] call me directly and how would they know my personal phone number?"

Avoid tech support phone scams

Tech Support Scams

Of course it's a scam and if there's any question in your mind at all you already know this is true.  The key to a scam is gaining your confidence, which is a confidence scheme also known in slang as "a con", one of the oldest and longest running schemes that mankind uses on each other.

Doesn't matter what technology; phone, computer or ringing your doorbell is used, the basic trick is always the same.  The only relatively new twist is using the names of various international companies or organizations you know and trust.

Confidence trick

Rob

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Similar thing just happened to me. I kept questioning who they were. Were they working for MS, etc. Claimed they were from Windows Service Center. Called me three times. Even called back after I hung up on them. 

Wanted control of my computer through logyou.net. All the factors from the post above were present in the calls I received.

They present a convincing argument that they are legit. However, the two people I talked to spoke such broken English that I could hardly understand them. That made me suspicious. Does MS really have agents that have that much trouble with the English language?

Anyway, just beware!

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I was called by a young woman with an Indian accent yesterday afternoon, but her method was slightly different.  She said she was calling in response to an issue on my PC.  Coincidentally, I had been having issues with my InstallAnywhere program, and had contacted someone asking for help.  I had assumed this was the response and fell for it hook, line, and sinker.  Luckily, I was out at the time and not in front of my computer, so we agreed that she would call back at 5 PM to 'assist' again.  The email I was waiting for popped up on my phone before she called back, so I grew suspicious, though vaguely.  I'm a dangerously trusting (i.e. stupid) person, and have been burned like this before.  I answered her call at 5:30, and the confidence in which she spoke convinced me all over again.  Of course, she told me to go to logyou.net and click the second option.  Being the idiot I am, I did.  It looked quite professional.  Luckily, when it downloaded and asked for my permission to make changes to my computer, I was just skeptical enough to click the subtext options where I found the name 'bigdaddy' or something like that.  Not a very Microsoft sounding name.  That was when I was going to draw the line, but I didn't have to.  Somehow, I was barred from selecting any options, nor was there an x icon to close out.  I was worried that I'd been properly hacked by that point even without clicking "I Accept", but the lady on the phone seemed just as confused as I was.  She transferred me to her superior, who I wanted to have words with anyway, but he was so busy talking over me to 'troubleshoot' that I just shut up.  He wanted me to open the site again and start over, but by then I was pretty sure something was up.  I decided I'd 'troubleshoot' by logging off without saying so.  He sounded quite confused, so I know he knew the moment I did it.  He then hung up on me, I assume because he knew the game was up.  I was nervous that it was too late by this point still, as he obviously could see what I was doing, but if they had access to everyone's CLSID before opening their website, then that game was lost before it began.  I still had a niggling doubt that it might be real, but now I know for sure I was about to be scammed.  Thanks.

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