Upgraded to Access 2010, Now my buttons don't work

I have just upgraded to Office 2010, now none of my buttons work in Access 2010. How can I resolve this.

 

PS: Microsoft... it shouldn't have to be like this.

 

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Last updated November 10, 2018 Views 3,779 Applies to:

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efandango wrote:

I have just upgraded to Office 2010, now none of my buttons work in
Access 2010. How can I resolve this.

Most probably your db runs in disabled mode. Solutions:
- trusted document
- trusted location
- disabled macro security

All this is possible in the Trust Center:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/infopath-help/view-my-options-and-settings-in-the-trust-center-HA010354326.aspx?CTT=1

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access-help/introduction-to-access-2010-security-HA010341741.aspx

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/infopath-help/enable-or-disable-macros-in-office-files-HA010354316.aspx?CTT=1#BM4
 -- cu
Karl
*******
Access-FAQ (German/Italian): http://www.donkarl.com

Karl
-----
Access Developers Conference: http://www.AccessDevCon.com
Acccess-Entwickler-Konferenz: http://www.donkarl.com/?AEK
Access FAQ (de/it): http://www.donkarl.com

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Karl Donaubauer [MVP] wrote in
news:*** Email address is removed for privacy ***
m:

Most probably your db runs in disabled mode.

You know, every time I see people having this problem I have to ask:

Who benefits from this setup?
So far as I can tell, there is no real danger from Access files
being exploited by hackers, so it seems to me this is just an
unnecessary inconvenience.
Why was this implemented? It looks like security theater to me, as
what always happens is that people turn down all the "security"
settings to the lowest possible level.
Who asked for these settings?

I have a sneaking suspicion it was corporate IT departments who
wanted their uses to not use Access. So they complained to MS that
they wanted better "security" and the end result is that Access apps
don't run without changes to the registry keys (which are often
locked down and unable to be altered by the user). Result: users
can't run Access apps.
I just don't see who benefits from this at all.


David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ contact via website only     http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/

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I couldn't agree more David!

These road blocks serve no real purpose and in the end actually deter real users from actually using the software and I have seen were they simply get frustrated fighting with the App/Trust center... and move to other software altogether (Open Office for instance).  I have 4 clients thus far that have switched because of (a) not liking the change in interface after v.2003 (b) having issues with the Trust Center. And yes, like you, I have also walked into businesses where to get around these headaches they simply turn the settings down to the minimal setting which in turn opens them up to real issues!  Small businesses do not want to need an IT expert to get an app such as Access functional when they have already paid to have the app developed.....  They want a plug and play experience which sadly is no longer the case since V2007.

Anyways, well stated.


Daniel Pineault, 2010-2011 Microsoft MVP
http://www.cardaconsultants.com
MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net
--
Daniel Pineault
Microsoft MVP 2010-2018

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Would you like me to send you an Access attachment that installs a trojan?

This happened a few years ago when VBA viruses first appeared. MSFT had to respond to that, and they added security to Outlook but they don't control other email clients. They added security to the other Office apps as well so it would be users choice if they want to run the app or not.

I'm not saying they did a good job on the user experience level, far from it, but the basic idea of preventing code to run until the user approves it is a necessary evil in today's world.


-Tom. Microsoft Access MVP
-Tom.
Microsoft Access MVP
Phoenix, AZ

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If someone opens a db, it is because they wish to use that database.   Asking them if the content such be enabled is kinda 'Stupid/redundant'.

You'll tell me that certain viruses can execute files..., well this is true, but then this would imply you already have bigger problems.  As far as people opening files they know nothing about, this security has done very little to change that from what I see day to day.  Most users, when they see the message ...some option may not ... simply enable it anyways not having a clue what code is behind the scenes anyways, so the security doesn't do a thing in the end but irritate users. 

This is one debate that will never go away.  No matter what any company does to stop viruses, malware,..., hackers... will always find a way around.  This is the sad reality of our world.

It is just sad that at the end of the day the user is the one to always suffer the consequences.


Daniel Pineault, 2010-2011 Microsoft MVP
http://www.cardaconsultants.com
MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net
--
Daniel Pineault
Microsoft MVP 2010-2018

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I agree, and I do not want to start a flame war. Just wanted to point out there is some rational behind the security features.

Hopefully the confused will make it to this and other forums, and we'll be there to help them back on their feet.


-Tom. Microsoft Access MVP
-Tom.
Microsoft Access MVP
Phoenix, AZ

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Yes!


Daniel Pineault, 2010-2011 Microsoft MVP
http://www.cardaconsultants.com
MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net
--
Daniel Pineault
Microsoft MVP 2010-2018

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According to MS Support the Install wizard should be capable of setting the appropriate Macro security options but unfortunately it currently doesn't and the issue has been passed to the development team.

Until they have a resolution you either have to manually set the Trusted locations or use the Sagekey installer (but it's not cheap).

The best manual solution is to add the folder where your mdb resides to trusted locations. It is probably best to add 'My Documents' to trusted locations to avoid this issue with other applications as well. goto options>Trust Center>Trust Center Settings>Trusted Locations>Add new Location

The whole macro security seems poorly thought through.

The real answer to malicious software is to make anti malware software freely available which MS seems to be now addressing with Security Essentials.

 

 

 

Kent

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Tom van Stiphout [MVP] wrote in
news:*** Email address is removed for privacy ***
m:

Would you like me to send you an Access attachment that installs
a trojan?

I have software running to catch that.

This happened a few years ago when VBA viruses first appeared.

???

The first VBA virus that spread widely was ILOVEYOU, which was a
social engineering exploit that worked because it tricked people
into opening a disguised document.
The only way this could happen with an Access file would be for
somebody to send you something that was infected without their
knowledge. But how often do people send around MDBs/ACCDBs? Really,
the risk here is very, very small.

MSFT had to respond to that, and they added security to Outlook but they
don't control other email clients. 

And they did a really bad job of it, in that they blocked file
extensions, rather than creating a sandbox for opening attachments
taht would block nefarious activity.

They added security to the other Office apps as well so it would be users choice if they want to run the
app or not.

And all of it was mere "security theater" and almost all of it was
such an inconvenience that users disabled it or ignored it. Thus,
they actually made things LESS SAFE.

I'm not saying they did a good job on the user experience level,
far from it, but the basic idea of preventing code to run until
the user approves it is a necessary evil in today's world.

There is no significant threat with Access files. Period.


David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ contact via website only     http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/

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Tom van Stiphout [MVP] wrote in
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m:

I agree, and I do not want to start a flame war. Just wanted to
point out there is some rational behind the security features.

I think it's worse to have "security theater" than it is to have no
protection at all because it causes people to disregard the notices.
This was the lesson learned about UAC between Vista and Windows 7,
that you have to strike a balance, and if you choose the wrong level
of user confirmation, people will simply turn off the security
entirely.

Hopefully the confused will make it to this and other forums, and
we'll be there to help them back on their feet.

It's a constant annoyance and I really don't think the MS approach
to "security" in Office programs makes a lick of sense.


David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ contact via website only     http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/

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