Office 2000 need upgrade

If I have Microsoft Office 2000, how do I upgrade to a newer version?  Do I have to purchase another disk?  Thanks.
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In addition to Rohn's most excellent information, I would suggest that you do a custom install and avoid letting the trial version to overwrite your Office 2000. Except for Outlook you can run multiple versions of Office on the same computer, and until you decide whether you want to move to Office 2010 or 2013, I would suggest you not burn that bridge.


Reference: Keep earlier versions of Office programs when installing Office 2010
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/keep-earlier-versions-of-office-programs-when-installing-office-2010-HA102597134.aspx

 

Reference: Working with Multiple Versions of Office:
 
Personally I have installed the many versions of Pubilsher in individual custom folders rather than default location.
 
By the way, why do you need an upgrade? I know of a number of people that prefer Publisher 2000 to all the newer versions...
 
DavidF

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Yes, you will have to buy a whole new copy of Office, to get the current version.

Starting with Office 2010 MS no longer felt they had to offer loyal customers a discount to keep them coming back, or as recognition of loyaty. MS no longer offers a discounted "upgrade" version. All Office 2010 versions are "full" licenses.

Have you seen what Office 2010 looks like. It has a totally DIFFERENT user interfact. The menus are gone, replace by a phat "Ribbon".

Right now Office is on a cusp. You can buy Office 2010 right now, or if you wait a little longer you can get a copy of the "future", Office 2013.  If you have no experience with 2010, I suggest you download and install a trial to see what it is about.  AND, you should download a 2013 beta trial copy, to see the new look.

NOTE: Office 2010 introduced a new marketing "scheme" (very much like 3-card monty) called the "Product Key Card". It is trivially cheaper to buy than a "full retail" license. That is because the average buyer is not aware of the severe limits of the new license type. PKC is good to install only on one computer, retail licenses allow you to install on 2 (3 for Home and Student only).  As well, the PKC is disposable. It it permanently tied to the first machine it is installed on. When the hardware dies or is sold, Office goes with it. The retail license allows you to transfer installations to new machines as required.

If you go with the trials right now, the 2010 trial will last  60 days (plus you can use the other 2 trials). The 2013 trial will last at least into April or later.   But the key thing to be aware of when using 2013 is that it is NOT yet ready for production, it is intended for testing only. It could crash or do other rude things.

2013 Technical Upgrade Offer

The advantage of holding off your purchase briefly is that rumor has it that MS will be announcing the final release date of 2013 in the next month or so. At that time they have "historically" also announced a "technical upgrade" program that gives new purchases of the current version (2010) a cheap or free upgrade to the new version.  For example people who buy a Win7 PC now, will be able to buy Win8 for $15 when it comes out at the end of October.  So if you wait to buy 2010, you effectively get a "2 for 1" deal.

 

NOTE: Pricing for 2013 has been announced and it is substantially MORE expensive for “retail licenses” than the 2013 equivalent because they are really pushing people to go with the “rental” scheme, that will cost you more money in the long term.



2012 09 17- MS announces Office 2013 prices and packaging

http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-announces-office-2013-prices-and-packaging-7000004381/

  • Office Home & Student, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote, will cost $140, up 17% from the current $120.
  • Office Home & Business, which includes the above apps plus Outlook, will go for $220, up 10% from the current price of $200.
  • Office Professional, which includes the above apps plus Access and Publisher, goes up to $400, a 14% bump from the current sticker price of $350.

·         If you want to install the traditional versions of Office 2013 on multiple PCs, you’ll need to buy separate licenses for each one.

My math has it a little different comparing retail to retail rather than PKC to new retail. The 2013 “Retail” licenses are now only good on 1 machine at a time, but still include transfer rights:

·         H&S $150/3 users = $50 up to $140  is 2.8 times more expensive, 180% more

·         H&B $280/2 users = $140 up to $220 is 1.8 times more expensive, 80% more

·         Pro $500/2 users = $250 up to $400 is 1.6 times more expensive, 60% more

·            

2012 09 17- Will a household license convince you to go with Office in the cloud? - $100/yr

http://www.zdnet.com/will-a-household-license-convince-you-to-go-with-office-in-the-cloud-7000004385/

 

2012 09 12 – Rumor says - Microsoft readies Office 2010 to Office 2013 Tech upgrade (free/cheap) program – Oct 19 – Apr 30    (PKC)   G.A. Feb

http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-readies-office-2010-to-office-2013-upgrade-program-7000004138/

 

2012 09 17- What you gain and lose with Office 2013 subscriptions – Price and features

http://www.zdnet.com/what-you-gain-and-lose-with-office-2013-subscriptions-7000004386/

 






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*****
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As computer scientists we are trained to communicate with the dumbest things in the world – computers –
so you’d think we’d be able to communicate quite well with people.
Prof. Doug Fisher

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Last updated March 2, 2019 Views 577 Applies to: