Continuous Form with a header to be fixed, such as a Split Form - Possible?

Hi MVP's

Initially, I had a split form, which had a header area that was fixed, even though the detail area was longer than the screen.

as you scroll to the right, the data displays with the scroll bar movement, but the header is fixed.

The detail area was a crosstab query which displayed as a datasheet.

Now i tried to implement a progress bar in the detail area, but because this was not possible to have in the detail area, 

I then tried to place the progress bar in the header area.  

So I tried changing this to a composite form.  This solved the issue of being able to have a progress bar, in the header area.

So as we scroll across to the right, we can see the progress bar, and label headings aligned with the detail area which contains the crosstable query via text elements.

But the issue with this composite form, is such that there area command buttons in the header area, and date text element, that should not disappear, when we scroll to the right.

My question is therefore what is the best solution to use the continuous form for data in the detail area, with progress bar in header area, that are both aligned.  And then to have a header area that contains pushbuttons and text elements that should be fixed in their header location.

Would a subform holding the pushbuttons/text elements be fixed to not scroll as the user uses the scroll bar. ie. similar to using a split form.

Thank you kindly

 

Question Info


Last updated March 15, 2019 Views 450 Applies to:
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So i still believe i need what is described

a continuous form

with the heading area to behave like a split form to fix the controls in a fixed position


You cannot scroll the bound controls in a form in continuous forms view independently of the form header.  You can simulate a split form, however, by means of a conventional parent form in which is embedded a subform in continuous forms view.  You'll find an illustration of how to do this in FindRecord.zip in my public databases folder at:

https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=44CC60D7FEA42912&id=44CC60D7FEA42912!169

Note that if you are using an earlier version of Access you might find that the colour of some form objects such as buttons shows incorrectly and you will need to  amend the form design accordingly.  

If you have difficulty opening the link, copy the link (NB, not the link location) and paste it into your browser's address bar.

In this little demo file the parent form is bound, and shows the currently selected record from the subform and vice versa, but if you merely want to include unbound controls in the form header, then you would, much more simply, use an unbound parent form.

_____________________
Ken Sheridan,
Stafford, England

"Don't write it down until you understand it!" - Richard Feynman

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You don't need any 'diagrams'.  All you need to do is create your bound form in continuous forms view.  Then create a new unbound form in single form view and drag the bound form from the navigation pane onto the unbound form in design view.  This embeds it as a subform.  Size and position it in the unbound parent form, leaving space above it for your progress bar and any other controls you want to remain static above the subform.  Then add those controls to the parent form.
_____________________
Ken Sheridan,
Stafford, England

"Don't write it down until you understand it!" - Richard Feynman

2 people were helped by this reply

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