Mobile Push Notification services are ending for Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0


On February 20, 2018, Mobile Push Notification services will be turned off for Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0.  Once this happens:

  • Your phone will no longer receive notifications.
  • Your phone will not receive additional live tile updates.
  • The “Find my phone” feature will no longer locate your phone.

 

Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0 have reached their end of support dates, and thus services for these versions of Windows will be discontinued over time. 

 

Note: 

Notification services will continue to function for Windows Phone 8.1 at this time, and newer phones running Windows 10 Mobile are still fully supported.

 

You can find information at the Windows Phone 7 FAQ and the Support Lifecycle policy.

 

Discussion Info


Last updated October 23, 2018 Views 8,216 Applies to:

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When I first got this HTC m8, I really like it. In a few ways I still like it more than an android. However, the limited and limited quality of available apps, the decision to cut HTC out of the windows 10 update, pushed my hand. I am going back to an android as soon as possible. I'll deal with less storage, and a phone interface I like less.

Microsoft needs to pick the ball up, they dropped it in the first place.

The cut of HTC, the limited limited quality of apps, the inability to obtain apps, from other spots(google play, etc.), the cut off for support for 8.1 while keeping HTC out of the 10 update, is just to much for me. I'd say, I'll keep my m8 just incase Microsoft changes/adds things, but I'm not going to hold my breath.

Its kinda sad to.

Verizon did the same thing with iPhones, even to the detriment of Verizon Android phones. I once sold cameras, and the various offered us "spiffs," or bonuses and incentives to sell their products rather than their competitors. Lexmark reps do the same with their products, so I assuming that similar practices occur in phone sales.

 Verizon stopped carrying even the last few Nokia Windows phones because of their squabble wit Microsoft over who would control when updates were pushed through. Obviously, when Verizon refused to even drop Windows phones, that helped to gut Sales of Windows phones. 

Verizon not carrying Windows Phone did seriously hurt the platform in the US.  Verizon's requirement that phones be certified for their network made it very difficult for people to bring their own phones to the network.  That basically blocked Windows Phone from 50% of the US market.  The mobile phone market is a global market, but when you are writing apps and 50% of one the largest markets by app purchases can't use Windows Phone, there isn't a good ROI for writing for that platform.

Microsoft spent a lot of resources helping companies get their apps on the platform, but they couldn't port everyone's app.


Chris Miller @anotherlab
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As mentioned before, the cost is measured in man hours to keep the servers running and updated.  Even if you do not make any changes to the service, you have to make sure that they continue to run correctly after security patches have been applied.

For a company that takes backward compatibility seriously, this was a short sided business decision.

Interesting. So Apple & Google can leave the server for the olde stuff running forever, while MS has to cut everybody off. I can understand not updating the OS any more (they've even dropped W10 support for the version that many if not most phones that upgraded from 8.1 are (without significant hacking) stuck at), even though they could (Enterprise still gets updates of that version), because Google does that too (anything over 2 years old is unsupported, in general, and cheaper stuff is never updated at all). But how much does it really cost to keep a server running for the old stuff essentially forever? 

Chris Miller @anotherlab
Please click "Helpful" or mark as Answer if you found my answer helpful

Interesting. So Apple & Google can leave the server for the olde stuff running forever, while MS has to cut everybody off. I can understand not updating the OS any more (they've even dropped W10 support for the version that many if not most phones that upgraded from 8.1 are (without significant hacking) stuck at), even though they could (Enterprise still gets updates of that version), because Google does that too (anything over 2 years old is unsupported, in general, and cheaper stuff is never updated at all). But how much does it really cost to keep a server running for the old stuff essentially forever? For Apple & Google, apparently, the pocket change involved isn't an issue. It's not like MS could force the phone users to replace their hardware with new Windows phones - there are no more new MS phones at any price, so anybody they force out of Windows will have to get a competitor's OS in their phone. Grrr...

The key thing here is that Google and Apple have not changed how push notifications work in ages, if ever.  The functionality has improved and new features added, but it didn't introduce breaking changes with each version of Android and iOS.  It doesn't cost them much extra to support older versions of the OS for push.

Microsoft changed their push notification protocols multiple times. This means that Microsoft was running multiple versions of push notifications. Someone probably looked at the 7.5/8 version and said there was no point keeping it running for X number of people. And X is a number that is dropping. The actual cost to keep the servers running was trivial, probably (and I'm completely guessing here) somewhere in the range of $150,000 to $200,000. Those costs being mainly the time for the support engineer to maintain the servers and services. Pocket change in the general scheme of things, but at the micro level it allows the Windows 10 team to spend that money on an additional engineer.


Verizon did the same thing with iPhones, even to the detriment of Verizon Android phones. I once sold cameras, and the various offered us "spiffs," or bonuses and incentives to sell their products rather than their competitors. Lexmark reps do the same with their products, so I assuming that similar practices occur in phone sales.

 Verizon stopped carrying even the last few Nokia Windows phones because of their squabble wit Microsoft over who would control when updates were pushed through. Obviously, when Verizon refused to even drop Windows phones, that helped to gut Sales of Windows phones. 

Interesting. So Apple & Google can leave the server for the olde stuff running forever, while MS has to cut everybody off. I can understand not updating the OS any more (they've even dropped W10 support for the version that many if not most phones that upgraded from 8.1 are (without significant hacking) stuck at), even though they could (Enterprise still gets updates of that version), because Google does that too (anything over 2 years old is unsupported, in general, and cheaper stuff is never updated at all). But how much does it really cost to keep a server running for the old stuff essentially forever? For Apple & Google, apparently, the pocket change involved isn't an issue. It's not like MS could force the phone users to replace their hardware with new Windows phones - there are no more new MS phones at any price, so anybody they force out of Windows will have to get a competitor's OS in their phone. Grrr...

The key thing here is that Google and Apple have not changed how push notifications work in ages, if ever.  The functionality has improved and new features added, but it didn't introduce breaking changes with each version of Android and iOS.  It doesn't cost them much extra to support older versions of the OS for push.

Microsoft changed their push notification protocols multiple times. This means that Microsoft was running multiple versions of push notifications. Someone probably looked at the 7.5/8 version and said there was no point keeping it running for X number of people. And X is a number that is dropping. The actual cost to keep the servers running was trivial, probably (and I'm completely guessing here) somewhere in the range of $150,000 to $200,000. Those costs being mainly the time for the support engineer to maintain the servers and services. Pocket change in the general scheme of things, but at the micro level it allows the Windows 10 team to spend that money on an additional engineer.


Chris Miller @anotherlab
Please click "Helpful" or mark as Answer if you found my answer helpful

Simple, they are actually better developed, maintained and updated/improved more regularly than the equivalents on WM, feedback is taken into account and applied without much of a delay.

Minor tweak: since they are actually still developed and maintained, period. MS as far as I can tell has dropped all app support for WM as well as all but security updates for the system (if even them, for all but the latest W10 releases). If you want a supported MS app, you must get it on Android or Apple. While obviously, for marketing purposes, this is necessary in the real world, I don't see how it's going to turn out well for MS in the long run.

Interesting. So Apple & Google can leave the server for the olde stuff running forever, while MS has to cut everybody off. I can understand not updating the OS any more (they've even dropped W10 support for the version that many if not most phones that upgraded from 8.1 are (without significant hacking) stuck at), even though they could (Enterprise still gets updates of that version), because Google does that too (anything over 2 years old is unsupported, in general, and cheaper stuff is never updated at all). But how much does it really cost to keep a server running for the old stuff essentially forever? For Apple & Google, apparently, the pocket change involved isn't an issue. It's not like MS could force the phone users to replace their hardware with new Windows phones - there are no more new MS phones at any price, so anybody they force out of Windows will have to get a competitor's OS in their phone. Grrr...
The lack of any new phones that outshine the Nokia 1020 has been a game killer for me. As an avid Microsoft Windows user, it was a sad day when I moved over to an android phone. But then again, it has open my business to chage, as we only dealt with Windows products in our retail business, I have opened the flood gates and now sell and work on multiple OS's and devices. Times continue to change.
That, and AT&T pushing iPhones above all else.  I obtained 3 Windows phones from AT&T over the years, and every time it was, "Are you SURE you don't want an iPhone?"  This last time I picked up an Alcatel Idol 4S unlocked from Microsoft so I only had to deal with AT&T for a nano-SIM.

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