EDIT: Installing windows 10 on 8.1 with bing tablet, error 0xc1900101 - 0x30017 from upgrade, custom install wont detect touchscreen,

Hi all.

Basically I was looking into getting a Windows 10 Tablet for Xmas. More specifically, a linx 10 (2gb ram, 32gb SSD, 1.86ghz Intel CPU, 1280x700 10inch screen, WIFI, Bluetooth, keyboard and touchpad included, MINI HDMI).

if I was going to install Windows 10 TP, how would I go about this? It wouldn't be my main PC, more for hobby's, running my website and gaming.

Thanks for any help.

TK

EDIT:

everythings ok with install until final bits, like preparing your pc, then BSOD and back to windows 8.1. Custom Install wont detect touchscreen.

 

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Last updated July 11, 2019 Views 18,246 Applies to:

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Does it have a USB port? Because, you would have to download Windows 10 .ISO file and prepare it on another computer. Also, you would have to prepare to wipe out the existing Windows 8.1 installation thats already on it.

Before you do that, I would recommend you backup the existing installation on it.

Also, see if you can download the drivers for your Tablet from the manufacturers website, because you are gonna  need them if you need to install a particular driver:

- Network/Wi-Fi

- Graphics

Create a complete System Image Backup with Windows 8.1

Why you have to do a clean install is because of the limited disk space, Windows 8.1 plus all the bundled apps I am sure are on your Tablet use a significant amount of disk space and Windows 10 requires a minimum 16 to 20 GBs of free disk space.

You probably could do an in place upgrade by starting the Windows 10 installation from within Windows 10 on the Tablet.

Since Microsoft made available the first pre-release build of Windows 10 in early October 2014, there has been some misunderstanding that this is not a product you should use to replace a production installation of Windows such as Windows 8 or 7 or Vista. Instead, if you must test it on a single machine, the best recommendation is to create a partition or have an a spare hard disk ready where you can install it. Windows 10 in its current pre-release state will expire and at the same time, it is unfinished work. So if you must evaluate it, the best way is by installing it beside your commercial installation of Windows.

Download and Prepare Windows 10 Preview .ISO file

There are a number of ways to start the Windows 10 setup, but before we even do that though, we need to ensure we have our copy of Windows 10 downloaded and turned into a bootable copy.

You need to download the .ISO file for Windows 10 Technical Preview:

Download Direct Links: x86 | x64

If you want to use the latest build which is the November Update (build 9879), you can download it at the following link. Future builds will be released by Microsoft, so the same principles can be applied.

Download: Windows 10 9879 ISO | US x86 - x64 | UK x86 - x64

Additional languages can be found here:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/preview-iso-update?os=win10

Determine whether 64 bit or 32 bit is right for your needs:

The following article will help determine the difference between both:

32 vs 64 bit

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/32-bit-and-64-bit-Windows-frequently-asked-questions

The article references Windows 7, but the same principles apply to Windows 10.

Preparing the .ISO file for installation.

See instructions for burning .ISO files in Windows 7 or later:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Burn-a-CD-or-DVD-from-an-ISO-file

You can also use the Microsoft USB/DVD Tool, which is recommended for Windows XP users.

After obtaining the .iso file you use the Microsoft .iso to USB/DVD tool to create a bootable DVD or USB (requires a blank DVD or USB flash stick of at least 4 GB).

Best,
Andre
Windows Insider MVP
MVP-Windows and Devices for IT
twitter/adacosta
groovypost.com

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As this is a technical preview I wouldn't rely on it for running (meaning managing) anything - it's for testing and trialling only.

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I have one of these Linx 10 tablets, but without the optional keyboard. I have been thinking of trying to image the drive with a view to trying 10 on it, but have not been brave enough to start yet.

It's a nice unit, and amazing value especially during the recent half-price offer from a well known office supplier.

It has one mini usb port and comes with an "otg" adapter lead. This can power and use an external 1TB usb drive, but I'm not sure how it would work with an external hub. Presumably the hub would have to be powered to run, say a drive and a usb memory drive.

It comes with the 32GB internal drive partitioned for  a 24GB C: drive and a recovery partition. There is no information anywhere that I have been able to find about how to use the recovery partition. As first installed W8.1 used about 4GB of the C: drive. The first updates used an additional 3GB. It doesn't seem to me that this is really a big enough drive for long-term use on either 8.1 or 10.

I have taken an image of the drive using the inbuilt Windows imaging software. I am not sure whether this can image the recovery partition as well as the main partition. I would probably use other imaging software. The "bios" is EFI and I have no idea how to see what the settings are or to adapt anything, such as the boot menu.

Final comment: used as a tablet, it took me a day of solid research to discover that I was holding it in a way that held an audio volume button down and then swiping upwards across the virtual Windows button to get to the login screen. This puts the tablet into "Narrator" mode before it can be logged in, which then can't be done. Recovery from this is only possible if you know the magic Volume + Windows key combination or by rebooting.  

 

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I tried W10TP on my Lenovo miix2 8. After a few days I returned back to W8.1, because W10 is not ready for tablets. There are few things why not, for example:

- Display automatic orientation does not work

- Metro style IE is not available

I have decided to wait the new build will be released on January. Maybe I will try then again.

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Thanks everyone for your answers.

Billaboard, I thought the same. Just seen a 50% off deal in Staples. Ao if it has that adapter lead, surely I can prepare a windows 10 USB install and install it from Windows 8.1? Why recovery menu?

thanks for the info Andre.

yeh, I'm thinking the same now salltu

TK

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My Linx 10 came from the Staples deal, and I've added a 32GB SD card. I've thought about this a bit more and seen the other comments here. I am trying W10 on a 32-bit Lenovo X60 pen tablet convertible and 64-bit on this X201 laptop. I think I can guess enough about the Linx if I leave it on 8.1 and extrapolate.

I don't know who the actual builder of this Linx tablet is. Someone posted a rar file that supposedly contains the drivers, but information about the device is as yet very thin on the ground. I will retain the recovery partition in case it helps in the future. A 20GB OS on a 24GB drive seems far too close for comfort. It doesn't seem possible to obtain an iso of the "Windows8.1+Bing" OS from anywhere, so I'll proceed very carefully with anything that might need a re-install.

I have wondered if it might be possible to dual-boot using the SD "drive", which shows up as a primary partition, as the  host for the second OS. Is this a stupid thought?

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My linx will be from Argos, it coms with a keyboard and touchad set, plus I will probs be buying either a 64gb or 128gb.

I'm thinking about dual booting it from the sd, therefore able to delete/wipe Windows from the sd, therefore not having the edit the actual device or seeting so that you can then just revert to windows 8.1.

maybe you just need to download a normal windows 10 TP x32 iso and install it via a usb or sd card, and see what happens.

how is it on the Lenovo?

TKA

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Tyler, this is now a bit off-topic, but I'll carry on. :-)

My son had an Acer W8 tablet with plug-in keyboard for use on train journeys. The problem was that the weight on one of these is in the screen tablet part, and it's very likely to fall over in anything but ideal conditions. He swapped it for a very light and expensive MacBook, which he can also run Windows on. The Linx tablet part is moderately heavy, so I would imagine that it would be similarly cumbersome  in real world use.

I have a few of the old Lenovo X60 laptop-come-tablets that I have been getting off ebay and doing up for family and friends. Unlike the later X201, they don't have a touchpad, but do use the IBM/Lenovo trackpoint that people either love or hate. I have had one running 8.1 for ages now, and it is fine after I had added a Charms button and a start menu to the task bar. Neither of these need 3rd party apps. The weight is in the keyboard area, so it's stable as a laptop, and twist the screen and it works well as a chunky tablet once you have found all the drivers.

These use a Wacom pen as the tablet input device, and this is precise and pressure sensitive, and fine on the desktop screen, where my fingers on the Linx are a bit crude. The pen gestures and swiping don't work too well in 8.1.

Windows 10 is far better than 8.1 on the Lenovo tablet, and I haven't added the Charms button to the Taskbar. I have added the start menu, though, as it seems better than the W10 one. I haven't yet tried to install all the drivers on W10, so there are a lot of things (eg auto-rotate) I haven't tested on the Lenovo, but it has a great keyboard plus usb and firewire sockets.

As delivered as a tablet, the Linx works well and I've been using it quite a lot. I haven't yet found any sort of precise pen for use on the desktop screen and haven't yet investigated alternative virtual keyboards. The initial one has no alt or up/down keys, but has a smiley button screen. I need to find one that's a bit less "toy".

I hope this gives a bit of insight into my (possibly warped) thinking.

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I got the tablet.

slight issue.

everything install o.k, until reboot where it prepares everything, then BSOD and back to windows 8.1. tried booting from usb, touch screen dont work and it will only custom install.

weird.

any solutions?

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I got the tablet.

slight issue.

everything install o.k, until reboot where it prepares everything, then BSOD and back to windows 8.1. tried booting from usb, touch screen dont work and it will only custom install.

weird.

any solutions?

I have no solutions, but where I am up to is as follows, and I'd welcome corrections from anyone who believes that I'm wrong:

1. I will not attempt to load W10 onto my Linx tablet until I have really got to grips with how the existing installation of 8.1+Bing works.

2. AIUI, 8.1 with Bing is very different from the normal Windows in the way it is installed. Instead of a straight installation on the C: drive, it operates by referring commands given to it via pointers into the compressed Recovery files on the recovery partition. Because it is working with an SSD rather than an old-fashioned main drive, these compressed files are decompressed and used as and when requested. This means that this 8.1 can operate fast, but takes less disk space than "normal" 8.1.

3. The C: drive only holds normal files (documents etc.) plus updates to the Windows OS. This means that the machine can always be recovered back to its factory installation using the inbuilt Windows 8.1 recovery - just like Android. I believe the recovery partition holds all the drivers (eg for the touch screen) and has to be built by the manufacturer of the device.

4. I think Windows 10 does not exist in this format yet, so you can only install to the standard C: drive, using most of it, and your Windows 10 won't understand or use the pointers to the compressed files that came with the tablet.

5. It might be possible to find the drivers for this tablet online (Google did once find a reference to a rar file, but I haven't been able to find it today), but these might or might not work with 10, and would take more of the small C: drive. If you blow away the recovery partition, the tablet will never work again unless you can get the re-installation files from the manufacturer.

6. There is Microsoft documentation on this http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/dn594399.aspx and it would be interesting to know whether or not the inbuilt Microsoft image file maker actually does image all the required partitions (they seem to have different names on my machine).

I have to say that I like the tablet as it is. I have had a few scares - such as dropping into the "bios" and having to borrow a usb keyboard to be able to navigate at all (luckily it works). I don't really understand how things like the OTG settings in the bios works with Windows or whether any apps or programs need this.

I'm very interested to know how you get on!

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