Windows 10 conflicting with Intel cpu Turbo mode?

I'm experiencing a very strange cpu/power issue in Windows 10.  Before I go into a necessarily long-winded explanation, here's the tl;dr:  using the Windows 10 Preview, my system appears to be ignoring Turbo mode.  The Intel Xtreme Tuning Utility reports that the cpu IS Turbo enabled, is NOT throttling, and IS set to receive additional voltage in Turbo mode.  Under heavy workload, the core clock increases per my multiplier, but the system does NOT give it extra Turbo voltage.  Making absolutely NO changes to the bios settings, I can dual boot into Windows 7 and all clocks and voltage are reported to be working as expected.  In other words, something in Windows 10 is telling my hardware not to give my cpu the right amount of power.

Now, in greater detail....

CPU:      Intel i7 4930K @ 4.6ghz (multiplier = x46)
Mobo:   Asus Rampage IV Black Edition
vcore:   +offset = .025
Turbo:   enabled
EIST:      enabled
cstates:  enabled

This all started in Windows 8.1 a few weeks ago when kb3000850 ("November 2014 update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2") was released.  This 8.1 update had the same effect.  After installing it, my system was unstable and reported lower voltage than it should have been receiving in Turbo mode.  I have my system set to use efficient power settings so the voltage increases and decreases as necessary with the cpu load (called "Additional Turbo Voltage" in the asus bios & Intel XTU software interface).  Once the update was applied, the system would apply vcore (vid + offset), but it would NOT apply any "Additional Turbo Voltage".  In order to achieve stability again, I had to set the base +offset vcore to compensate for the Turbo voltage that was not being applied because the system no longer recognized Turbo mode.

 

i.e

before the update, under heavy load:    VID 1.27 + Offset .025 + Additional Turbo Voltage .05 = ~1.34v 

since the update, under heavy load:      VID 1.27 + Offset .025 (Additional Turbo Voltage .05) = ~1.29v

for stability since, under heavy load:      VID 1.27 + Offset .07 + Additionaly Turbo Voltage .00 = ~1.34v 

 

I corrected the problem by rolling back the update and hiding it so it would not reinstall.  Once the update was removed from my system, the clock, voltage, and stability of my system returned to normal.  Since then, I decided to ditch Windows 8.1 for now and set up a dual boot with Windows 7 & Windows 10 Preview instead.  

In Windows 7, using the exact same bios settings, the system reports the expected clock & voltage, just as Windows 8.1 did before kb3000850.  With EIST & cstates enabled, the cpu downclocks to x12 when it's idle, and ramps up to 4600mhz (x46) with vcore= ~1.344v.  This is with offset +.025v & "Additional Turbo Voltage" +.055v. (as shown above).

 

In Windows 10, however, again with no change to the bios settings and using identical Power Options in Windows, the system behaves exactly as it did after kb3000850 in 8.1.  Which is to say, again under Windows 10 the system seems to not recognize Turbo mode even when the cpu thinks it is in Turbo mode. Intel XTU reports that the cpu is NOT throttling, IS Turbo enabled, and IS set to .055v Additional Turbo Voltage.  

After a LOT of troubleshooting, the only thing I've concluded that while at first glance this may seem like a hardware problem, it actually MUST be related to the OS environment, because the hardware, with the exact same settings, is acting exactly as expected in Windows 7 (and Windows 8.1 without the kb).  I'm perplexed how Windows could block voltage set up in the bios, or how Intel software used within the Windows 10 environment can "see" the Turbo settings and report Turbo success when every sensor in the system, MS or otherwise, says it is not.  Also, I don't think this is just a sensor malfunction, as the system actually crashes under a stress test load which it easily passes at the same settings in the other OS.

Anyway, I've shared this problem on several tech hardware forums, but nobody else seems to be seeing anything like this. I don't know if that means there something unique to my setup that is causing a conflict, or if my settings are just so specific and so finely tuned that I've found a problem nobody else has noticed yet.  Either way, I figured it was worth sharing here since it seems to be something tied to the most recent Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 updates.  

If anybody has any ideas or suggestions they would be most appreciated.  :)

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Make sure report these issues through Feedback App too.

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Thank you very much for the response, I did report it through the app also.

I've been doing exhaustive digging into it tonight, and I think I may have figured out the problem.  I pulled apart Asus's chipset installation file to extract the .ini's.  They are all set to identify the OS and then based on that identification install certain packages, hotfixes, dotnetfx, and then finally the INF catalog.  However, running the first AsusSetup.exe file in Windows 8 compatibility mode isn't enough, it's still hitting ini's deeper in the file that it can't identify and by default installing old broken files, drivers, & programs for Win NT 2003.... and all the drivers it's installing are dated 2006.  Pretty sure it thinks I'm on a Windows 2003 system. And being packed full of 7 generation old dotnet architecture and hardware INFs designed for devices that were around before HD TV is almost certainly what is causing my system to think the chip is over the power limit and can't go into Turbo mode. I'm gonna install each piece separately using the right compatibility settings and reinstall from scratch tomorrow, see if that fixes the problem.  No more time tonight, already WAY past my bedtime.

I'll report back if it works.  And I'll give Asus an ear full too. ;)

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Ok, I'm stumped.  I've tried everything from re-flashing the bios image, to reinstalling/updating the chipset, to doing a clean Windows reinstall and resetting EVERYTHING to stock.  No matter what I do, something in Windows 10 is conflicting with the bios delivering Intel Turbo voltage.  Something in the c-states, I'm assuming, but I can't figure out what.  For now, I'm abandoning the Preview build and going back to Windows 7.  Hopefully somebody at Microsoft (or Intel, or Asus) will see this and look into it - I've exhausted every bit of troubleshooting available to me.

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I am experiencing the same problem, win10 locked my cpu to its base frequency, but it works fine under win 8.1. 

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Try these two links for fixes to KB3000850 which might help you fix your driver issue.

(I know this is windows 10 and you are not try to fix KB3000850 but the solution is similar)

http://notesofaprogrammer.blogspot.com.au/2015/04/fixing-windows-update-error-for.html

http://notesofaprogrammer.blogspot.com.au/2015/04/restoring-corrupted-windows-components.html

Right-click start, command prompt (admin)
Type each command and press enter
Check the logs for errors & missing folders or driver files

sfc /scannow

Dism.exe /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

There are three logs that we typically examine for clues to identify corrupted

component or component store.

The Component-Based Servicing log, i.e., %WinDir%\Logs\CBS\CBS.log
The Deployment Image Servicing and Management log, i.e., %WinDir%\Logs\DISM\DISM.log
The driver setup log, i.e., %WinDir%\Inf\setupapi.dev.log

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have you tried disabling Erp ready in bios and MRC fastboot (mrc fastboot is in memory timings setting).

disabling mrc fast boot wil enable your cpu to train itself to the memory timings,

i have had alot of strange file corruptions and long reboot times until i disabled Erp ready in bios.

(it worked well with windows 8.1 though) also no real file corruption but every reboot and boot windows 10 seemed to have deleted something or it didn't get saved on shutdown. every reboot got worse.

this Erp ready is a powermanagement option.

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No,  sfc & dism have nothihng to do with it, they seek to find update installations that have become corrupted and then allow you to redownload them.  This problem is that the original configuration of a freshly installed Windows 10 OS blocks the Intel chip from telling my Asus hardware that it is operating efficiently and has overhead to go into Turbo Mode, and so somehow Windows is blocking Turbo voltage from ever making it to the cpu.  Eitheer that, or my other guess is  the Win10 clock reference counter is out of sync, as if you were to take 10 footsteps withoiut realizing they were each only 3 inches apart.  Maybe the OS *thinks* it's allowing the correct voltage and/or receiving the correct performance, but it measurably is not because that "Additional" setting is left out. 

Fwiw, when that 8.1kb first caused the problem I absolutely did follow the above procedure to remove it, reset it, clean it out, and then reinstall it, only to find it broke it again the second time I installed it too.  It was literally the last straw that with Windows 8 that convinced me to dive into the deep end of the Windows 10 beta (I figured even a beta OS would be better than 8.1 with a cpu it wouldn't let have enough power. lol)  Needless to say, I was *less than thrilled to find the same problem in 10*.  But I decided to try to get to the bottom of it so I wouldn't have to stay on 7 or figure out how to use Ubuntu or some such nonsense

And btw, the latest build, done with a clean install from scratch and tested IMMEDIATELY before installing or configuring ANYTHING showed the same cpu vcore (which excluded the ATV that was reported in XTU as being applied to vcore) and all cpu temperature sensor reported 5-7 degrees celsius below they're actual operating temp.

Thanks u very much for the suggestion though, i appreciate all the help I can get figuring out if I really did just uncover an unknown voltage regulation bug just before the final release?  Because that would be kinda legendary. lol

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Dell Venue 8 Pro tablet:

I have reported this bug several times through the insider tool 6-8 months ago. Yesterday I tested RTM build 10240 (clean install, nothing installed except Windows 10), and the bug is still there. Even connected standby drains too much power, had done a 24h test resulting in about 1-2mW/h.

Switched back to Windows 8.1, resulting in 0.33mW/h. Under Windows 8.1 the throttling also works normal for idle/lowest power state => 0.5-0.8GHZ for the BayTrail CPU.

But under Windows 10, the throttling doesnt seem to work properly, never goes down to the correct lowest power state and always stays and jumps between 1.3 and 1.8GHz.

The funny thing, after using build 10240, which is equal to RTM and what goes live on the 29th of July, Ive at least encountered 15-20 minor to major bugs after just about 15 minutes, some of them Ive reported too several months ago via insider, and got ignored.

Big congratulations Microsoft. I guess Windows 10 may be usable in 6 months or so, after they notice complains and take bug reports seriously. It's always the same with an open beta, bug reports get ignored, because too many people send in bogus reports. I cant blame Microsoft for this, still it's a shame.

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FWIW, I've been using Windows 10 overclocked just fine using vcore alone.  Power states work fine for me (other than the Turbo-specific Voltage boost), though I'm not sure the on-die temp sensors are reading correctly -- but again, I haven't a clue if that's part of the Intel vs Windows 10 bug that I seem to have discovered [?], or if it's a conflict between Asus (motherboard) drivers vs Windows 10.  And then there's always the possibility that power delivery IS screwed up beyond ATV and as a result temps are lower due to improper power functions...though I would think that would manifest in BSODs etc as my system is overclocked rather heavily and requires fine-tuned voltage/power settings to function.

Anyway, at this point I'm hoping Asus, Intel, and/or Microsoft is actually paying attention and this is something that will be addressed in a future patch update. 

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I can confirm this behavior on my Dell Venue 8 Pro 5830 64GB on Windows 10 Home 32-bit.

Switched back to Windows 8.1, resulting in 0.33mW/h. Under Windows 8.1 the throttling also works normal for idle/lowest power state => 0.5-0.8GHZ for the BayTrail CPU.

But under Windows 10, the throttling doesnt seem to work properly, never goes down to the correct lowest power state and always stays and jumps between 1.3 and 1.8GHz.

This part about the loss of throttling, in particular, needs to be fixed as soon as possible. The speed tends to float between the default 1.3ghz and the max 1.8ghz, even when idling, never dropping below.

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Last updated July 24, 2021 Views 6,225 Applies to: