X-RaNgEr
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X-RaNgEr asked on

How exactly does Windows 7 Retail vs OEM

Hi All,
I don't fully understand how Windows 7 Retail vs OEM.   What I understand is OEM is locked to one computer. AKA Mac address or
BIOS, not sure. However, what happens when my the Intel motherboard fails or I decide to upgrade my system motherboard included, which I like do on a regular basic. Is the OEM version still locked to the original motherboard and if it fails I must purchase a new OEM copy of Windows 7?  Or can it truly be relicensed, if only one copy if active?  Is there a method for doing so?   It is still a Full Windows 7 license, which I paid for. Can I just replace the motherboard and reinstall it?   I don't care about Windows Support, or the box.


With Windows XP Professional OEM, I was able to reinstall if my motherboard was changed out (I must of changed motherboard 10 times in 10 years) or if I upgraded my hard drives.  Reinstall required a phone call and explainiation, however, it was never a problem.

Good FAQ here, but doesn't answer my question.
http://www.sevenforums.com/general-discussion/18233-oem-vs-retail-war.html

Thanks for your response I am sure others would like to know and understand this situation.

Jay

Andre Da Costa
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Andre Da Costa replied on
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However, what happens when my the Intel motherboard fails or I decide to upgrade my system motherboard included, which I like do on a regular basic. Is the OEM version still locked to the original motherboard and if it fails I must purchase a new OEM copy of Windows 7?

It is simply tied to that motherboard and becomes non transferable, the minute you installed and activated the license.
Andre Da Costa http://adacosta.spaces.live.com http://www.activewin.com
techingiteasy.wordpress.com
Windows Expert - Consumer
Carey Frisch
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Carey Frisch replied on
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OEM versions of Windows 7 are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:

- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel

- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on

- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system
Carey Frisch
Windows Expert - Consumer
Andre Da Costa
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Andre Da Costa replied on
MVP Wiki Author Community Moderator MCC: Content Creator MCC: Content Curator
However, what happens when my the Intel motherboard fails or I decide to upgrade my system motherboard included, which I like do on a regular basic. Is the OEM version still locked to the original motherboard and if it fails I must purchase a new OEM copy of Windows 7?

It is simply tied to that motherboard and becomes non transferable, the minute you installed and activated the license.
Andre Da Costa http://adacosta.spaces.live.com http://www.activewin.com
techingiteasy.wordpress.com
Windows Expert - Consumer
X-RaNgEr
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X-RaNgEr replied on

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Hi Andre,
Thanks for your reply. Are you sure?  That doesn't make any sense.  To pay 179.99 for a cup holder?   Do you have Proof, or are you just guessing?  Have you tried it?  Are you from Microsoft?

So dell has to pay for a new license if one of their motherboards fail?  And ship it to the customer. I don't think that happens...

Thanks,
Jay
Carey Frisch
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Carey Frisch replied on
MVP Community Moderator
OEM versions of Windows 7 are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:

- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel

- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on

- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system
Carey Frisch
Windows Expert - Consumer
X-RaNgEr
Found this helpful 3
X-RaNgEr replied on

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Hi Carey,
Thanks for your Reply.

That just seems crazy to me.  If buy a new motherboard from an online retailer.  Install and setup the computer with Windows 7 and the motherboard dies a week later. I am out $179.99 USD for my copy of Windows 7 Ultimate?  This is ridiculous, insane, murderous Satan Spawn!   Why even create such a monster? For what purpose does it serve?   Now I know why people hack their software.    

I would just like to tell Microsoft to go to ____ on this one!
 

Carey Frisch
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Carey Frisch replied on
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Hi Carey,
Thanks for your Reply.

That just seems crazy to me.  If buy a new motherboard from an online retailer.  Install and setup the computer with Windows 7 and the motherboard dies a week later. I am out $179.99 USD for my copy of Windows 7 Ultimate?  This is ridiculous, insane, murderous Satan Spawn!   Why even create such a monster? For what purpose does it serve?   Now I know why people hack their software.    

I would just like to tell Microsoft to go to ____ on this one!
 


If your motherboard "dies a week later", you simply RMA the motherboard and get an exact replacement and you'll be good to go.
Carey Frisch
Windows Expert - Consumer
X-RaNgEr
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X-RaNgEr replied on

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Hi Carey,
Thanks for your Reply.

If it is locked to the BIOS or the MAC address of the network adapter the RMA replacement board is going to have a different MAC Address and BIOS. So Windows 7 OEM will not work, it will be useless.

Jay

Carey Frisch
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Carey Frisch replied on
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Hi Carey,
Thanks for your Reply.

If it is locked to the BIOS or the MAC address of the network adapter the RMA replacement board is going to have a different MAC Address and BIOS. So Windows 7 OEM will not work, it will be useless.

Jay


Naw -  You can always "activate by phone" and quickly explain the situation and be issued a new activation code (free of charge.)
Carey Frisch
Windows Expert - Consumer
X-RaNgEr
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X-RaNgEr replied on

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Hi Carey,
What?

I thought you said..
"- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard"

So they can renew it but they will not?

If you can renew it for a RMA motherboard then why not for a newer motherboard, aka a new computer? 

If Intel would stop changing their CPU sockets every 5 minutes, I wouldn't have to get a new motherboard.  I currently have an Intel D975XBX2 motherboard which I will upgrade to a Intel DX58SO and an Core i7 processor in the next six months, but I don't want too have to wait for Windows 7.  So if I get the OEM version I can't upgrade.  Unless I call and tell them my motherboard failed?

This whole thing is not explain clearly at all.

Thanks,
Jay
Tugg
Found this helpful 6
Tugg replied on

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There are 2 scenerios here:  Replacement vs Upgrade.  They are to be treated completely separate, no matter how illogical it may sound.

By accepting an OEM license, you are bound to the same license that HP, Toshiba, Dell etc would have.  If a company like Dell sold a computer with a Pentium 4 motherboard and a 5 year warranty and that motherboard goes bad after 4 years and 11 months, will they replace it with an i7 motherboard?  In short, "no."  They will replace it with the same type of motherboard and the license will carry over to the "new replacement" motherboard.

What you want to do is logical, but not possible.  You want the benefits of the full retail version but the price point of the OEM version.  Microsoft had to determine what was considered a new computer.  Changing the mouse, keyboard, casing, monitor etc just doesn't cut it as a new computer.  But changing out the Motherboard and CPU, well that does cut it.  It's like your car.  Change out the seats, windows, wipers, intake, exhaust etc, it's still the same car.  But change out the engine and you're sure to have a hard time registering it at the DMV.  At least in California.

tarachian
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tarachian replied on

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http://oem.microsoft.com/script/ContentPage.aspx?pageid=552846#faq3

This will answer all your questions .. in legaleez, of course.  But OEM software for 7 looks like OEM for XP to me.  If you load it, you're responsible for it.  Look at the conditions for refurb/rebuild of systems for this case. As a computer business owner I'm gonna get an OEM copy when people start wanting 7.  Till then, I'll reformat the drive and keep XP.  We all "KNOW" XP works.  I'm not a testing ground for the first release of Windows 7.
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