CalicoCrow
Had this question 3
Question
CalicoCrow asked on

Are some forms of DRM Rootkits?

I have several questions concerning DRM which I can not find explicit answers, here and elsewhere. I've found many opinions, often differing and opposing, so I'm asking for more info, including additional opinions so I can decide whether I need to format my drive and reinstall Win 7 or if there are other alternatives.  My questions are followed by comments - please read the comments as well before responding.


Questions:
1) Is DRM a form of rootkit or can it affect the boot sectors?
Specifically, I'm asking about any version of Sony's SecuRom, but information on any of the typical game or problematic DRM schemes would be appreciated in case I encounter them in the near future.
2) Will formatting a drive remove the rootkit (or any DRM)?
I've read references that one should delete the partition(s) and reformat which should clean the drive completely.
3)If I use Win 7 Backup w/Repair disk to restore a newly formatted drive, will it copy any form of rootkit (boot sector DRM) on to the 'blank' drive?
4)Why don't game publishers have to have some statement about the DRM that's going to be installed along with the game since it's so invasive. (I know there's  probably not a legal answer for this, but asking anyway, since I think it should be mandatory.)
Comments:
According to the FAQs on the SecuRom website, they claim it is not a Rootkit:  "SecuROM™ does not install any components or perform any processes at the kernel or ring 0 level. All SecuROM™ components and processes occur at ring 3, the normal application level."

Comments/information on this welcome


SecuRom's Website FAQ: http://www.securom.com/support_faq.asp


System: Windows 7 Home Premium, 64 bit - clean install on a home-built new computer.


Installed Mass Effect on the computer (legitimate store bought software) entered serial number etc. downloaded/installed patches, played the game. Later installed Mass Effect 2 on the computer, entered serial number, downloaded/installed patches, played the game. These were the only 2 games installed.
I did a Window's backup/image and then installed Crysis: Warhead, serial number, patch, etc.  Found that I could not remap the keyboard for reasonable left-handed play, unlike Mass Effect, so I wasn't interested in keeping it on the computer. I used the Repair Boot CD and did a restore of the backup/image I had. Rebooted or tried to, except the system hung during the boot sequence. The BIOS screen started, 1 beep, could see the drives listed, etc. then it would hang part way into the process. Could not enter the BIOS. Re-attempted several times without any change. On a hunch, I pulled out drive C: and put another drive (empty) booted with the Repair CD and installed the backup/image. Rebooted perfectly - it's what's been running for weeks now. That's why I suspect that the DRM in Crysis could be considered a Rootkit - it may have affected the boot sectors. (No apparent problem with the Mass Effect DRM.)
After that experience, I started checking out Crysis and DRM and found out about SecuRom. Found out if you uninstall the Mass Effect games, SecuRom is still on the system. (Confirmed by EA tech support). Used the SecuRom Removal tool, which did not remove any of the Registry entries. Complained to EA again. While they provided me with links to software, I had found instructions on how to remove the SecuRom Registry entries with RegDelNull. (EA's suggestions seem to be about the same.)
So the present situation is both games have been uninstalled completely. The Registry cleaned of any references to SecuRom. I've tried a variety of searches in the C drive for other references and it appears to be clean. I don't have reason to believe I have a Rootkit, other than perhaps something from SecuRom; but I have run ProcessExplorer and Resource Monitor occasionally to check for unusual activity and spotted nothing.
I have not run any Rootkit revealers as I haven't figured out which one to trust yet. Suggestions welcome.
Other than the suspicious boot problem with the Crysis Warhead DRM which was eliminated by restoring to another hard drive, my system seems stable. And I don't really want to do a clean install unneccessarily, but will do it to be certain I don't have any DRM leftovers.

Steve Kline
Found this helpful 0
Answer
Steve Kline replied on

Reply

Thanks for the reply. However, my initial question still remains unanswered: Are some forms of DRM, Rootkits?


No, they are not rootkits if you installed the application yourself. There may be a chance of a poorly programmed implementation of DRM based software, but it does not make it a rootkit. The idea behind a rootkit is that the collection of administrator or kernel layer based tools are installed silently in the background that impose threats on the information stored on the computer or any information that computer has access to with the credentials provided by an authorized users permissions. The nature of a rootkit is also considered malicious or to have malicious intent or abuse of the information or resources the rootkit has access to. SecuRom = Rootkit, very unlikely, especially from well known Manufacturers like EA.

Sony... well I could rant all day long about Sony and their facist claims on technology... but... it is what it is. As far as your particular copy of SecuRom, did you try updating the software to make sure that the software itself is patched for potential bugs... I.e; Failed uninstallations due to a silly typo or a case sensitive call in the uninstall application. There's many factors to play on why a particular piece of software behaves the way it does. As far as the Sony SecuRom removal tool failing, then I would consider contacting their support teams for SecuRom.

Keep in mind the routine practice of performing Backups saves more frustration than complete reinstalls. I hope you enjoy some of the additional contents in the other books. My bookshelves are stocked on Microsoft, Linux, and Cisco content... feel free to shoot me any questions directly if you wish or maybe I'll see you in the forums again.

My Apologies about indirect answers, I have tendencies to skim-read to figure out the general idea because in MOST cases, it's repeat questions in forums. However I don't have an answer to aid your persual on the SecuRom issues. Best of Luck on finding your answers.

Best Regards CalicoCrow,

-Steve K  - MCTS - I'm only one notch away from MCITP:SA 2008, then onto the MCITP: EMA(Enterprise Messaging Administrator)

*** Email address is removed for privacy *** -


Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. - Archibald Putt's (Putt's Law)
Its me!
Steve Diesel
Found this helpful 0
Steve Diesel replied on

Hi,

Ask more specific, its quite confusing.

Did you make any changes?

What exactly is your issue?

Refer this and see if it helps:

http://www.betanews.com/article/Sony-to-Help-Remove-its-DRM-Rootkit/1130965475

http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/1065/sony-drm-rootkit-easy-free-test-to-see-if-you-are-infected/
CalicoCrow
Found this helpful 0
CalicoCrow replied on

Reply

your 1st link - As noted in my 1st submission, I used the SecuRom Removal tool - it did not work.

your 2nd link - it's dated 2005 and probably not pertinent to Windows 7. I had seen the article and did check for $sys$ files - not found.

I believe my questions are specific - while I've learneda lot about this topic (SecuRom), I don't consider myself an 'expert,' or knowledgeable enough about boot sectors and Windows backup - hence the questions.

1) Is DRM a form of rootkit or can it affect the boot sectors? (see EA class action lawsuit below)

2) Will formatting a drive remove the rootkit (or any DRM)? I've read references that one should delete the partition(s) and reformat which should clean the drive completely.


3)If I use Win 7 Backup w/Repair disk to restore a newly formatted drive, will it copy any form of rootkit (boot sector DRM) on to the 'blank' drive?

4) I found more information on this yesterday after I posted, but I am still looking for information/opinions.

The class action lawsuit against EA (Electronic Arts) for the game Spore, states that SecuRom is used on Ring 0 (contrary to what Sony says). Which as my limited understanding/knowledge goes, makes it a candidate for a RootKit. According to the terms of the terms of settlement of the lawsuit (page 8 Stipulation of Settlement.PDF) from: http://www.easettlement.com/    - EA is supposed to be marking the retail packaging with a statement "This product includes SecuROM copy protection technology from Sony DADC). The EULA is also supposed to have a similar statement. Games sold online are to be marked with disclosure statement. However, I checked EA's website and they are not showing any direct statement. They weasel out by showing a tiny, gray text link at the bottom of the page, "Product Eulas and other Disclosures". On that page, you have to go down the list of all the games to find it.

So after reading the lawsuit, I'm more incline to believe some versions of SecuRom (or even all of them) are rootkits) and I want to get rid of it.

CalicoCrow
Found this helpful 0
CalicoCrow replied on

Reply

Everyone on vacation?

Before I posted, I searched and found 1 entry on SecuROM; Lots on Rootkits, but they were rootkits specific to malware. The DRM problems seem to be mostly music/Media Player related.

Is DRM, particularly SecuROM a forbidden topic?

 

Since I'm not getting any response to any of the questions, I'm left with reinstalling Windows.

itconcerned
Found this helpful 0
itconcerned replied on

Reply

Hi,

Welcome.

>"Is DRM a form of rootkit or can it affect the boot sectors? ...any version of Sony's SecuRom..."

Some people find it as being rootkit and more about DRM and SecuROM, please, take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SecuROM  where is plenty of links about those .

SecuROM official site: http://www2.securom.com/ and

What is SecuROM™?: http://www.securom.com/support_faq.asp#securom  .

>"...I'm left with reinstalling Windows."

Just one more friendly advice: after reinstalling OS, install Revo Uninstaller at http://www.revouninstaller.com/ before installing any application, moreover games, doing so and using it to uninstalls, you will get no leftovers after.

Rgds.


itconcerned
Security, play it safe, prevent.
Steve Kline
Found this helpful 0
Steve Kline replied on

I have several questions concerning DRM which I can not find explicit answers, here and elsewhere. I've found many opinions, often differing and opposing, so I'm asking for more info, including additional opinions so I can decide whether I need to format my drive and reinstall Win 7 or if there are other alternatives.  My questions are followed by comments - please read the comments as well before responding.


Questions:
1) Is DRM a form of rootkit or can it affect the boot sectors?
Specifically, I'm asking about any version of Sony's SecuRom, but information on any of the typical game or problematic DRM schemes would be appreciated in case I encounter them in the near future.
2) Will formatting a drive remove the rootkit (or any DRM)?
I've read references that one should delete the partition(s) and reformat which should clean the drive completely.
3)If I use Win 7 Backup w/Repair disk to restore a newly formatted drive, will it copy any form of rootkit (boot sector DRM) on to the 'blank' drive?
4)Why don't game publishers have to have some statement about the DRM that's going to be installed along with the game since it's so invasive. (I know there's  probably not a legal answer for this, but asking anyway, since I think it should be mandatory.)
Comments:
According to the FAQs on the SecuRom website, they claim it is not a Rootkit:  "SecuROM™ does not install any components or perform any processes at the kernel or ring 0 level. All SecuROM™ components and processes occur at ring 3, the normal application level."

Comments/information on this welcome


SecuRom's Website FAQ: http://www.securom.com/support_faq.asp


System: Windows 7 Home Premium, 64 bit - clean install on a home-built new computer.


Installed Mass Effect on the computer (legitimate store bought software) entered serial number etc. downloaded/installed patches, played the game. Later installed Mass Effect 2 on the computer, entered serial number, downloaded/installed patches, played the game. These were the only 2 games installed.
I did a Window's backup/image and then installed Crysis: Warhead, serial number, patch, etc.  Found that I could not remap the keyboard for reasonable left-handed play, unlike Mass Effect, so I wasn't interested in keeping it on the computer. I used the Repair Boot CD and did a restore of the backup/image I had. Rebooted or tried to, except the system hung during the boot sequence. The BIOS screen started, 1 beep, could see the drives listed, etc. then it would hang part way into the process. Could not enter the BIOS. Re-attempted several times without any change. On a hunch, I pulled out drive C: and put another drive (empty) booted with the Repair CD and installed the backup/image. Rebooted perfectly - it's what's been running for weeks now. That's why I suspect that the DRM in Crysis could be considered a Rootkit - it may have affected the boot sectors. (No apparent problem with the Mass Effect DRM.)
After that experience, I started checking out Crysis and DRM and found out about SecuRom. Found out if you uninstall the Mass Effect games, SecuRom is still on the system. (Confirmed by EA tech support). Used the SecuRom Removal tool, which did not remove any of the Registry entries. Complained to EA again. While they provided me with links to software, I had found instructions on how to remove the SecuRom Registry entries with RegDelNull. (EA's suggestions seem to be about the same.)
So the present situation is both games have been uninstalled completely. The Registry cleaned of any references to SecuRom. I've tried a variety of searches in the C drive for other references and it appears to be clean. I don't have reason to believe I have a Rootkit, other than perhaps something from SecuRom; but I have run ProcessExplorer and Resource Monitor occasionally to check for unusual activity and spotted nothing.
I have not run any Rootkit revealers as I haven't figured out which one to trust yet. Suggestions welcome.
Other than the suspicious boot problem with the Crysis Warhead DRM which was eliminated by restoring to another hard drive, my system seems stable. And I don't really want to do a clean install unneccessarily, but will do it to be certain I don't have any DRM leftovers.


DRM also known as "Digital Rights Management" is a fully legitimate component in the operating system, it is not an optional package, it's an essential package that you do not have an option on when you install the operating system. It is to protect the rights of software and media that is published. This is why you have to connect to the internet to obtain the proper DRM Keys to use some of the software.

SecuRom is a software component that verifies that the digital media is original and protects the media from being copied.

Your Answers:

1) Is DRM a form of rootkit or can it affect the boot sectors? - No it's not a rootkit, no it doesn't impede in your operating system functions, It simply manages the licensed software you are using.

2) Will formatting a drive remove the rootkit (or any DRM)? - Yes, but reinstallation of Windows will return it as a hidden folder.

3)If I use Win 7 Backup w/Repair disk to restore a newly formatted drive, will it copy any form of rootkit (boot sector DRM) on to the 'blank' drive? Yes

4)Why don't game publishers have to have some statement about the DRM that's going to be installed along with the game since it's so invasive. It is not invasive, it's to verify that you do not have a stolen copy. Just like Windows Genuine Advantage. Each software vendor has that right.

Other Applications of the Digital Rights Management:

Purchased Digital Movies; Roxio CinemaNow; NetFlix; Blockbuster.com Digital Rental; iPOD and Music store downloads

How does it work? Some of these limited use digital content requires that you login when you watch the movie unless you save your credentials, it will re-use them when you access the file again.

DRM is not a rootkit, it's a fully legitimate component of Windows...

Some additional resource for your perusal on the digital security of future technologies with Windows.

Microsoft Next-Generation Secure Computing Base - Technical FAQ >> http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc723472.aspx


Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. - Archibald Putt's (Putt's Law)
Its me!
CalicoCrow
Found this helpful 0
CalicoCrow replied on

Reply

 

>No it's not a rootkit, no it doesn't impede in your operating system functions, It simply manages the licensed software you are using.

>It is not invasive, it's to verify that you do not have a stolen copy. Just like Windows Genuine Advantage. Each software vendor has that right.

I disagree.

A) Invasive because: nowhere does the retail packaging, the included manual nor the installation process mention that additional software will be installed. As I point out in the recent class action suit against EA - EA is supposed to be show a notice of DRM (SecuROM) is installed and their compliance is so obscure it's almost invisible unless you make an effort to look for it. They are not in any hurry to advertise SecuROM.

B) Invasive because the so-called SecuROM removal program can't remove it after there is no need for it once the games have been completely uninstalled. So if their own tool can't remove it, why should I trust anything about it? Maybe you know what it does or doesn't do, but I don't.

C) Plus, in the instance of Mass Effect and Mass Effect 2, serial numbers were included and a part of the install process and then, unknown to me, the added SecuROM.  If the serial numbers aren't working, then why bother with them? If they are working, what's the point of SecuROM? Wearing belts and suspenders and their pants still fall down.

D) It isn't just like Windows Genuine Advantage as far as I understand it.  If I replace Windows 7 with Linux, there's no point to have Windows Genuine Advantage on the system.I know of Windows 7 Genuine Advantage from having it with XP; years ago, the games that I've installed only had a product key - AFAIK there wasn't any DRM installed.

I'm not arguing that a software publisher doesn't have the right to protect their copyright, my point is when their actions interfere with my property without my knowledge or in essence their rights trample over my rights.

When you say it's not impeding my system, how do you know this? There's been a lot of reports of DRM affecting equipment. I can't personally verify, except for the one new hard drive that would not boot after a game install. Once I formatted the drive, it worked. And that's a new drive, installed and tested when I built the computer.

-----------

>DRM is not a rootkit, it's a fully legitimate component of Windows...

I disagree. But perhaps I misunderstand or I'm just ignorant of DRM.

If SecuROM, (made by SONY) is a legitimate component of Windows, why wasn't it installed when I just re-installed Windows 7? Or was it?

If it's a form of copyright protection while I have the game installed that's acceptable and if I was told upfront about it; but why is it needed once I uninstall the game?

Some of the DRM that has been installed recently (from my research online) is indicative of publishers attempting to reduce the game being resold (a very big market)  - which has nothing to do with copyright protection.

The old arguments still work - legitimate users get stuck with problems that really aren't effective in stifling piracy anyway.

So my only choice is to treat most commercial games like I would a virus or a trojan; don't buy/install them unless I'm certain there's no DRM curse attached. For the most part this means giving up playing any popular new game.

Again, from my research online, I've seen quite a few people stating some DRM is a RootKit by definition - that is, it has kernal privileges. There's no way for me to tell if these are opinions or statements of fact. One fact is known, SONY did create Rootkits and surreptitiously installed them, causing a lot of problems -  SONY certainly has the technical knowledge and capability to do so.

So yes, perhaps SecuROM is not a Rootkit. I can neither confirm it nor deny it, I only have an opinion based on my experience. However, now that I am aware of it, I chose not to have it installed on my computers.

------

>2) Will formatting a drive remove the rootkit (or any DRM)? - Yes, but reinstallation of Windows will return it as a hidden folder.

Sorry - I don't understand this. What does reinstalling Windows have to do with DRM that is/was installed with 2 games? If I format the drive, a clean reinstall Windows but none of the games, how would the game DRM return as a hidden folder?

I've just ordered "Windows Internals" 5th edition, by Mark E Russinovich and David Solomon. Maybe I'll learn something helpful there. At least I won't have to deal with DRM as I read the book.

 

Steve Kline
Found this helpful 0
Steve Kline replied on

Reply

 

>No it's not a rootkit, no it doesn't impede in your operating system functions, It simply manages the licensed software you are using.

>It is not invasive, it's to verify that you do not have a stolen copy. Just like Windows Genuine Advantage. Each software vendor has that right.

I disagree.

A) Invasive because: nowhere does the retail packaging, the included manual nor the installation process mention that additional software will be installed. As I point out in the recent class action suit against EA - EA is supposed to be show a notice of DRM (SecuROM) is installed and their compliance is so obscure it's almost invisible unless you make an effort to look for it. They are not in any hurry to advertise SecuROM.

B) Invasive because the so-called SecuROM removal program can't remove it after there is no need for it once the games have been completely uninstalled. So if their own tool can't remove it, why should I trust anything about it? Maybe you know what it does or doesn't do, but I don't.

C) Plus, in the instance of Mass Effect and Mass Effect 2, serial numbers were included and a part of the install process and then, unknown to me, the added SecuROM.  If the serial numbers aren't working, then why bother with them? If they are working, what's the point of SecuROM? Wearing belts and suspenders and their pants still fall down.

D) It isn't just like Windows Genuine Advantage as far as I understand it.  If I replace Windows 7 with Linux, there's no point to have Windows Genuine Advantage on the system.I know of Windows 7 Genuine Advantage from having it with XP; years ago, the games that I've installed only had a product key - AFAIK there wasn't any DRM installed.

I'm not arguing that a software publisher doesn't have the right to protect their copyright, my point is when their actions interfere with my property without my knowledge or in essence their rights trample over my rights.

When you say it's not impeding my system, how do you know this? There's been a lot of reports of DRM affecting equipment. I can't personally verify, except for the one new hard drive that would not boot after a game install. Once I formatted the drive, it worked. And that's a new drive, installed and tested when I built the computer.

 

Then you may want consider a migration to linux and uninstall every version of Windows you have dating back to Windows XP because the End User License Agreement that you agreed to by installing operating system software implied that you understood that DRM is a part of Licensing Agreement to install the operating system... I mean this sarcastically. I highly doubt you want to remove them all because video games that are made for Linux aren't as highly entertaining as the ones published for Windows are.

Please review the End-User License Agreement for each Operating System in Section 2 - DESCRIPTION OF OTHER RIGHTS AND LIMITATIONS

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/eula/home.mspx

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/eula/pro.mspx

For Windows Vista and Windows 7: Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, Professional, and Ultimate editions for x86 and x64 architectures alike with the Microsoft Intellectual Property rights.

http://www.microsoft.com/About/Legal/EN/US/IntellectualProperty/UseTerms/Default.aspx

 I figured since you had performed an installation or two, and maybe performed a retail installation from a copy of Windows you may have read the License Agreement at one point but I am posting this incase this had missed your level of awareness on the DRM. Because that technology was available, did not mean that application developers were 100% savvy on the technology or how to develop applications to use DRM. They are now coming to sense that this may help them secure their products as legitimate copies with a thumbprint(serial) that will communicate with their servers and authorize the software as legitimate.

However, that technology dates back to Origination of Windows XP. As far as SecuRom https://support.securom.com/faq_general.html Support for removing SecuRom should be directed to the manufacturer of your game that installed the SecuRom Software. So for that one game you have, EA Games would be your route for support on SecuRom removal.

I hope this helps a little bit more!!

Windows Internals is a good read, enjoy! :)

I enjoy a lot of the little tools SysInternal guys publish. (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/default.aspx)


 

 Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. - Archibald Putt's (Putt's Law)

Its me!
CalicoCrow
Found this helpful 0
CalicoCrow replied on

Reply

Thanks for the reply. However, my initial question still remains unanswered: Are some forms of DRM, Rootkits?

And you didn't answer my second set of questions to you. I attempted to distinguish between Microsoft's DRM and Sony's SecuROM DRM that was installed. And I understand that purchasing and installing a legitimate copy of Windows involves accepting the EULA. Microsoft's EULA describes TOS and DRM. The retail game package, the game EULA, the game manual (and EA's website) do not mention DRM.

Certainly Linux is an option. I am researching the Linux distros for potential use on the next computer I build (not for replacing the OS on existing computers).

>However, that technology dates back to Origination of Windows XP. As far as SecuRom https://support.securom.com/faq_general.html  Support for removing SecuRom should be directed to the manufacturer of your game that installed the SecuRom Software. So for that one game you have, EA Games would be your route for support on SecuRom removal.

Check my initial request - I did contact EA support for information on the DRM and that's why I posed the question here -- EA tech support claimed the DRM would still remain on the computer even after using SONY's SecuROM removal tool. However, SONY's removal tool, as I previously pointed out, didn't remove it. I ended up using one of SysInternals tools to remove SecuROM from the Registry. However, that didn't necessarily mean the DRM was fully removed from my computer if it was a rootkit. And since I was unable to get an answer here and other forums about DRM being a Rootkit, I reformatted the drive and reinstalled Windows.

Yes, I did read the EULA when I installed. But since you provided links to both XP and Windows 7, I reread them. Interesting that there's a difference in the wording between XP and Win 7. In XP, it's called “Digital Rights Managements”; in Windows 7, it's called “Windows Media Digital Rights Management”. The game that I referred to, did not install Windows DRM, it installed Sony's SecuROM DRM. So EA did not use a Microsoft form of DRM. I suspect that "Media" does not refer to games, but to songs, movies and other such content under agreement with the recording, broadcasting and film industries.

"Windows Internals" has been helpful in explaining a lot of the processes within Windows. Nothing on Rootkits. However, I found (and ordered) another book directly dealing specifically rootkits that was recommended by Mark Russinovich: “Rootkits: Subverting the Windows Kernel ” by Greg Hoglund and Jamie Butler. Perhaps I'll find an answer there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Kline
Found this helpful 0
Answer
Steve Kline replied on

Reply

Thanks for the reply. However, my initial question still remains unanswered: Are some forms of DRM, Rootkits?


No, they are not rootkits if you installed the application yourself. There may be a chance of a poorly programmed implementation of DRM based software, but it does not make it a rootkit. The idea behind a rootkit is that the collection of administrator or kernel layer based tools are installed silently in the background that impose threats on the information stored on the computer or any information that computer has access to with the credentials provided by an authorized users permissions. The nature of a rootkit is also considered malicious or to have malicious intent or abuse of the information or resources the rootkit has access to. SecuRom = Rootkit, very unlikely, especially from well known Manufacturers like EA.

Sony... well I could rant all day long about Sony and their facist claims on technology... but... it is what it is. As far as your particular copy of SecuRom, did you try updating the software to make sure that the software itself is patched for potential bugs... I.e; Failed uninstallations due to a silly typo or a case sensitive call in the uninstall application. There's many factors to play on why a particular piece of software behaves the way it does. As far as the Sony SecuRom removal tool failing, then I would consider contacting their support teams for SecuRom.

Keep in mind the routine practice of performing Backups saves more frustration than complete reinstalls. I hope you enjoy some of the additional contents in the other books. My bookshelves are stocked on Microsoft, Linux, and Cisco content... feel free to shoot me any questions directly if you wish or maybe I'll see you in the forums again.

My Apologies about indirect answers, I have tendencies to skim-read to figure out the general idea because in MOST cases, it's repeat questions in forums. However I don't have an answer to aid your persual on the SecuRom issues. Best of Luck on finding your answers.

Best Regards CalicoCrow,

-Steve K  - MCTS - I'm only one notch away from MCITP:SA 2008, then onto the MCITP: EMA(Enterprise Messaging Administrator)

*** Email address is removed for privacy *** -


Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. - Archibald Putt's (Putt's Law)
Its me!
CalicoCrow
Found this helpful 0
CalicoCrow replied on

Reply

>Sony... well I could rant all day long about Sony and their facist claims on technology... but... it is what it is.

I wasn't happy with all the recent firmware updates and EULA changes on the Playstation 3 but finding SecuROM installed on my PC without any indication from the EULA really annoyed me. I canceled my Playstation account and told Sony it was due to firmware changes and the SecuROM DRM installation on my computer; wrote to the president of Sony Canada and reiterated that. They sent the letter to the US and an executive called me trying to get me to sign back in but I refused. No I don't trust them.

>As far as your particular copy of SecuRom, did you try updating the software to make sure that the software itself is patched for potential bugs.

Yes - before I even installed the software, I checked for patches and downloaded it. And also checked the forums for any 'surprises' that might have been lurking. Then I installed and patched.

Not being certain SecuROM was/wasn't a rootkit, I opted for formatting and reinstalling - see below.

>Keep in mind the routine practice of performing Backups saves more frustration than complete reinstalls.

I did the backup route - but it got ugly. In one instance I did a backup (drive E:) before installation, then installed the game (Crysis) and patch. Found that I was unable to rebind the keyboard to my satisfaction (I'm left-handed) and used the Repair CD to restore the backup (from E:) which worked as normal. But when I rebooted, it hung (same place on several retries). And this is why I wondered if it the Crysis DRM was a rootkit and it messed up the boot sector somehow. I pulled out the C drive and replaced it with a new drive; used the Repair CD again, did a restore (from E:) and it rebooted perfectly. The original C: was less than 2 months old - I just hot plugged the old C drive in and did a long format on it. Switched drives and restored and it rebooted as expected. 'Possibly,' had I uninstalled the game and used the SecuROM uninstall tool, it might have worked. However, at that time, I was not aware of the SecuROM installation and firm believer in using backup/restore - it saves a lot of hassles.

The hanging boot behavior, based on the  "Windows Internals" book, might have been a corrupted MBR or a boot corruption. If so, it was very coincidental that only time I've seen this happened was just after I installed Crysis and attempted to restore the backup. 

>"No, they are not rootkits if you installed the application yourself."  Interesting phrasing :-)   I got my Rootkit book delivered today, so I wade through that and see if there's anything helpful, assuming I can stay in the shallow end of that pool.

Thanks again and Regards