xpac5896
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What registry cleaner is the best for windows?

Original Title: "Registry Cleaners"

Realizing that Microsoft doesn't want you to fool arround with the registry, and I understand why, what registry cleaner is the best one for windows?  I'm running Windows in 64bit Home Primium and I have no idea if that makes any differance or not.

No.Compromise
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No.Compromise replied on

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I'm not able to find a copy of Regclean on the Microsoft download site. I'm under the impression that it's not supported, and not available for download from Microsoft anymore.

Even if things aren't critical, they can be stored (by Windows, or third-party programs) for convenience in the registry.  Various API support mechanisms that third-party apps use may also have implementation details that rely on the registry.

Ultimately, the question may come down to: "Why do you think you need to clean your registry?"  A few extra entries - in fact, several MB(!) of extra "stuff" in the registry, probably will have no noticeable performance impact (this is likely location-dependent).  Various guidelines suggest not storing more than 2 KB in a registry value; it would take a lot of 2 KB values to build up an extra 1 MB of data (not that someone is forced to adhere to the guidelines, though, but that's another story).

So ultimately, there is little need for a registry cleaner.  Issues with performance should be tracked and if the registry is found to be involved then targeted troubleshooting should be used to diagnose and rectify the problem.

In the context of the notion of a registry cleaner, I like Mark Russinovich's (technical fellow at Microsoft, and author of Windows Internals books and Sysinternals utilities) statement (from Registry Junk: A Windows Fact of Life ).

I haven't and never will implement a Registry cleaner since it's of little practical use on anything other than Win2K terminal servers and developing one that's both safe and effective requires a huge amount of application-specific knowledge.
mohdrafi
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mohdrafi replied on

Do not use or purchase registry cleaners. Cleaning your registry wont increase performance of your system.

In fact , Sometime it can harm your system and may cause lot of troubles. An incorrect change to your computer's registry could render your computer inoperable.

Only install windows 7 compatible and certificated software. You must use Programs and Features to uninstall programs or to change the program's configuration.

Hope this info helps you


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xpac5896
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xpac5896 replied on

After posting this question I did some reading in the "RELATED TOPICS" and found that most people say stay away from registry cleaners because of their potential disasterous effects. I have to agree to that fact because I did at one time use a cleaner and bad things started happening after using it. However that was years ago and understanding that things do change and I figured that so do registry cleaners. Maybe the question should have been " If I use a registry cleaner, which one gives you the ability to choose which entry should be deleated or fixed and at the same time gives you the ability to back up your registry before doing anything to it?"

I know for a fact that Windows saves junk to the registry ie: I had opened a number of jpeg files and found that the registry had entries of them, why? They're not critical files or programs so why would the registry hold these entries? I'm sure there are other things as well ie: uninstalling a program and the entry is still there even though the program is gone. I think perhaps there could be an argument in regards to Registry Cleaners. Microsoft came out with one if you remember, it was called REGCLEAN. I know that that was years ago but you can still download a copy right here at Microsoft. That little ditty doesn't give you any control over anything and if you use it you have no idea what is being changed. I used it and boy, did I get a problem and it was a Microsoft program. If Microsoft came out with a registry cleaner, of sorts, then there must have been a reason for it.

No.Compromise
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No.Compromise replied on

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I'm not able to find a copy of Regclean on the Microsoft download site. I'm under the impression that it's not supported, and not available for download from Microsoft anymore.

Even if things aren't critical, they can be stored (by Windows, or third-party programs) for convenience in the registry.  Various API support mechanisms that third-party apps use may also have implementation details that rely on the registry.

Ultimately, the question may come down to: "Why do you think you need to clean your registry?"  A few extra entries - in fact, several MB(!) of extra "stuff" in the registry, probably will have no noticeable performance impact (this is likely location-dependent).  Various guidelines suggest not storing more than 2 KB in a registry value; it would take a lot of 2 KB values to build up an extra 1 MB of data (not that someone is forced to adhere to the guidelines, though, but that's another story).

So ultimately, there is little need for a registry cleaner.  Issues with performance should be tracked and if the registry is found to be involved then targeted troubleshooting should be used to diagnose and rectify the problem.

In the context of the notion of a registry cleaner, I like Mark Russinovich's (technical fellow at Microsoft, and author of Windows Internals books and Sysinternals utilities) statement (from Registry Junk: A Windows Fact of Life ).

I haven't and never will implement a Registry cleaner since it's of little practical use on anything other than Win2K terminal servers and developing one that's both safe and effective requires a huge amount of application-specific knowledge.
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
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Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP replied on
On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 13:07:06 +0000, xpac5896 wrote:
 
> Realizing that Microsoft doesn't want you to fool arround with the registry, and I understand why, what registry cleaner is the best one for windows?
 
 
 
The best registry cleaner is *no* registry cleaner.
 
Registry cleaning programs are *all* snake oil. Cleaning of the
registry isn't needed and is dangerous. Leave the registry alone and
don't use any registry cleaner. Despite what many people think, and
what vendors of registry cleaning software try to convince you of,
having unused registry entries doesn't really hurt you.
 
The risk of a serious problem caused by a registry cleaner erroneously
removing an entry you need is far greater than any potential benefit
it may have.
 
Read http://www.edbott.com/weblog/archives/000643.html
 
And also
http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2005/10/02/registry-junk-a-windows-fact-of-life.aspx
 
 
 
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
 

Ken Blake
Richard G. Harper
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Richard G. Harper replied on
The best registry cleaner is no registry cleaner. The only time one should
be used is under explicit instructions and with explicit need to remove
certain information only (virus or spyware clean-up, etc) - not as a tool to
help maintain your system.
 
"xpac5896" wrote in message
news:*** Email address is removed for privacy ***...
Realizing that Microsoft doesn't want you to fool arround with the registry,
and I understand why, what registry cleaner is the best one for windows?
I'm running Windows in 64bit Home Primium and I have no idea if that makes
any differance or not.
 
 
AndrewZX1
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AndrewZX1 replied on

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Here's what Mark Russinovich says about registry cleaners lately:

"Registry cleaners have always been popular, but I never paid much attention to them. I originally thought that there might be valid reasons for their existence, but over time changed my mind, only to recently recognize that even today they can help maintain Registry hygiene."

http://www.windowsitpro.com/article/registry2/registry-junk-a-windows-fact-of-life.aspx

 

The problem is not speeding things up or compressing anything, it's junk left behind after uninstalls. These can leave keys behind that cause problems and/or prevent the installation of other applications. I am debugging such a problem on a client's PC. 

Here is something offered in onecare by Microsoft. I can't vouch for it.

http://onecare.live.com/site/en-us/center/cleanup.htm